1. Welcome to Religious Forums, a friendly forum to discuss all religions in a friendly surrounding.

    Your voice is missing! You will need to register to get access to the following site features:
    • Reply to discussions and create your own threads.
    • Our modern chat room. No add-ons or extensions required, just login and start chatting!
    • Access to private conversations with other members.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon!

Featured Education of women in Islam

Discussion in 'Religious Debates' started by adrian009, Aug 2, 2019.

  1. adrian009

    adrian009 Well-Known Member
    Staff Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2014
    Messages:
    8,202
    Ratings:
    +6,152
    Religion:
    Baha'i
    I've been reading a book titled:

    'Factfulness: Ten Reasons We're Wrong About the World--and Why Things Are Better Than You Think'

    Written by Anna Rosling Rönnlund, Hans Rosling, and Ola Rosling

    Factfulness: Ten Reasons We're Wrong About the World – and Why Things Are Better Than You Think - Wikipedia

    The book highlights how enormous progress has been made worldwide in regards life expectancy, economic progress and levels of education worldwide. There has been a dramatic shift worldwide in stadards of living attributed in no small measure to better access to health and education.

    In the Western world such as much of North America, Europe and the Antipodes there is little doubt about the overall levels of prosperity and well being of populations, with similar trends throughout much of Asia, South America and even in the Middle East. Even Africa has made remarkable progress.

    So I was wondering about education of women being even more important in some instances than men as women are often the first educators of children and have an enormous influence on their children as role models.

    How about the education of women throughout the Islamic world. How is that progressing?

    In a 2013 statement, the Organization of Islamic Cooperation noted that restricted access to education is among the challenges faced by girls and women in the developing world, including OIC member states.[56] UNICEF notes that out of 24 nations with less than 60% female primary enrollment rates, 17 were Islamic nations; more than half the adult population is illiterate in several Islamic countries, and the proportion reaches 70% among Muslim women.[57] UNESCO estimates that the literacy rate among adult women was about 50% or less in a number of Muslim-majority countries, including Morocco, Yemen, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Niger, Mali, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, and Chad.[58] Egypt had a women literacy rate of 64% in 2010, Iraq of 71% and Indonesia of 90%.[58] While literacy has been improving in Saudi Arabia since the 1970s, the overall female literacy rate in 2005 was 50%, compared to male literacy of 72%.[59]

    Some scholars[60][61] contend that Islamic nations have the world's highest gender gap in education. The 2012 World Economic Forum annual gender gap study finds the 17 out of 18 worst performing nations, out of a total of 135 nations, are the following members of Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC): Algeria, Jordan, Lebanon, (Nepal[62]), Turkey, Oman, Egypt, Iran, Mali, Morocco, Côte d'Ivoire, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Chad, Pakistan and Yemen.[63]


    In contrast, UNESCO notes that at 37% the share of female researchers in Arab states compares well with other regions.[65] In Turkey, the proportion of female university researchers is slightly higher (36%) than the average for the 27-member European Union as of 2012 (33%).[66] In Iran, women account for over 60% of university students.[67] Similarly, in Malaysia,[68] Algeria,[69] and in Saudi Arabia,[70] the majority of university students have been female in recent years, while in 2016 Emirati women constituted 76.8% of people enrolled at universities in the United Arab Emirates.[71] At the University of Jordan, which is Jordan's largest and oldest university, 65% of students were female in 2013.[72]

    In a number of OIC member states, the ratio of women to men in tertiary education is exceptionally high. Qatar leads the world in this respect, having 6.66 females in higher education for every male as of 2015.[73] Other Muslim-majority states with notably more women university students than men include Kuwait, where 41% of females attend university compared with 18% of males;[73] Bahrain, where the ratio of women to men in tertiary education is 2.18:1;[73] Brunei Darussalam, where 33% of women enroll at university vis à vis 18% of men;[73] Tunisia, which has a women to men ratio of 1.62 in higher education; and Kyrgyzstan, where the equivalent ratio is 1.61.[73] Additionally, in Kazakhstan, there were 115 female students for every 100 male students in tertiary education in 1999; according to the World Bank, this ratio had increased to 144:100 by 2008.[74]

    However, in the United States, a recent study done by the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding found that Muslim American women (73%) are more likely than Muslim American men (57%) to achieve higher education (post-high school education or higher).


    Women in Islam - Wikipedia

    So while education of women is progressing very well in some Islamic countries, there is relatively poor performance in others.

    In this thread I'd like to explore what aspects of Islam today positively promote education and how might the culture within the Islamic world inhibits progress.

    Thanks for sharing your thoughts.
     
    • Informative Informative x 2
  2. sooda

    sooda Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2019
    Messages:
    10,808
    Ratings:
    +3,309
    Religion:
    Christian
    Women's education in Saudi Arabia is producing 67% rate for women in universities. Under Islam women have the "right" to an education,

    I don't know about the other data, but your information on KSA is wrong.
     
  3. stvdv

    stvdv Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2018
    Messages:
    5,122
    Ratings:
    +2,764
    Religion:
    Sanathana Dharma [The Eternal Religion]
    Good point. I am curious how the average Muslim man thinks about this?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. sooda

    sooda Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2019
    Messages:
    10,808
    Ratings:
    +3,309
    Religion:
    Christian
    Like the average American.. Muslim women in Arabia apply for more business licenses than men.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  5. danieldemol

    danieldemol Well-Known Member
    Premium Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2011
    Messages:
    2,176
    Ratings:
    +1,414
    Religion:
    Baha'i inspired liberal
    What exactly are you disputing? The data said that, “In Iran, women account for over 60% of university students.[67]Similarly, in Malaysia,[68] Algeria,[69] and in Saudi Arabia” which loosely matches your quoted figure of 67%.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Useful Useful x 1
  6. adrian009

    adrian009 Well-Known Member
    Staff Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2014
    Messages:
    8,202
    Ratings:
    +6,152
    Religion:
    Baha'i
    My sourcce from 2014 says 60% so it may have chnaged since then. What's your source?

    A small step for female education in Saudi Arabia

    Maybe, but the percentage of women graduates in the owrk force is still low in Saudi Arabia.

    Although 60 per cent of graduates in Saudi Arabia are female, only 17 per cent of these women are in the job market. These statistics compare with 75 per cent of men.


    Although King Abdullah, who is viewed as a very cautious reformer of women’s rights, changed the law in 2011 to allow women to work in lingerie, jewellery, and abayas (the long black robes women are required to wear in Saudi Arabia) shops, progress remains slow.


    A small step for female education in Saudi Arabia

    Male relatives often refuse to allow them to enter the work place.
     
    • Useful Useful x 2
  7. adrian009

    adrian009 Well-Known Member
    Staff Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2014
    Messages:
    8,202
    Ratings:
    +6,152
    Religion:
    Baha'i
    I'd be interested too. Men who appear to have a great deal more power and influence within the work place often prevent women's progress along with the male relatives of women seeking a career path.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. sooda

    sooda Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2019
    Messages:
    10,808
    Ratings:
    +3,309
    Religion:
    Christian
     
  9. Notanumber

    Notanumber A Free Man

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2016
    Messages:
    6,199
    Ratings:
    +1,351
    Religion:
    Literal liberalism
    Are they segregated from the male the students?
     
  10. Wasp

    Wasp Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2019
    Messages:
    946
    Ratings:
    +221
    In Saudi Arabia, maybe.
     
  11. sooda

    sooda Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2019
    Messages:
    10,808
    Ratings:
    +3,309
    Religion:
    Christian
    My source is being in ksa in 1961when girls schools opened, knowing king Abdullah and touring some of their universities in 2000
     
  12. Wasp

    Wasp Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2019
    Messages:
    946
    Ratings:
    +221
    I fail to see what this has to do with Islam.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. adrian009

    adrian009 Well-Known Member
    Staff Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2014
    Messages:
    8,202
    Ratings:
    +6,152
    Religion:
    Baha'i
    In Saudi Arabia:

    Segregation between the sexes is still strictly enforced, with women and girls forbidden to travel, conduct official business, or undergo certain medical procedures without permission from a male guardian, according to the Human Rights Watch World Report (2013).

    A small step for female education in Saudi Arabia
     
  14. adrian009

    adrian009 Well-Known Member
    Staff Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2014
    Messages:
    8,202
    Ratings:
    +6,152
    Religion:
    Baha'i
    The acquisition of knowledge, the independant investigation of reality, humility, the capacity to consider what we learn or discover judiciously and wisely are not just intellectual attributes but spiritual ones to.

    Considering this in more depth from a Quranic perspective:

    One of the purposes of our being created is that we may discern and know God:

    “And Allâh has brought you out from the wombs of your mothers while you know nothing. And He gave you hearing, sight, and intellects that you might give thanks"
    Quran 16:78


    Reading and recitation are as keys to knowledge:

    “Read! In the Name of your Lord Who has created all that exists.
    He has created man from a clinging substance.
    Read! And your Lord is the Most Generous.
    Who has taught by the pen.
    He has taught man that which he knew not”
    Quran 96:1-5


    Muhammad teaches that first we should have knowledge and warns against acting without knowledge:

    “And follow not that of which you have no knowledge. Verily, the hearing, and the sight, and the heart of each of those ones will be questioned”
    Quran 17:36


    Muhammad asks we have knowledge and fear of God

    “It is only those who have knowledge among His slaves that fear Allâh”
    Quran 35:28


    Muhammad says being both learned and believer occupies a noble status:

    “Allâh will exalt in degree those of you who believe, and those who have been granted knowledge”
    Quran 58:11


    Because of the importance of knowledge, Muhammad has asked we seek more of it:

    “and say: ‘My Lord! Increase me in knowledge’”
    Quran 20:114


    The learned are exalted:

    “Say: ‘Are those who know equal to those who know not?’ It is only men of understanding who will remember ”
    Quran 39:9


    Those who have knowledge may be the amongst those who readily understand the truth from God and believe in it:

    “And that those who have been given knowledge may know that it is the truth from your Lord, so that they may believe therein, and their hearts may submit to it with humility”
    Quran 22:54


    Through God's Teachings our hearts can become purified and we can attain to wisdom,

    Certainly did Allah confer [great] favor upon the believers when He sent among them a Messenger from themselves, reciting to them His verses and purifying them and teaching them the Book and wisdom, although they had been before in manifest error.
    Quran 3:164

    There is no goodness in knowledge which is not confirmed by action, or words which are not adorned by deeds:

    “O you who believe! Why do you say that which you do not do?
    Most hateful it is with Allâh that you say that which you do not do”
    Quran 61:2-3


    In regards knowledge, we are asked to consider even the celestial realm as this too is God's Creation:

    Indeed, in the creation of the heavens and the earth and the alternation of the night and the day are signs for those of understanding.
    Who remember Allah while standing or sitting or [lying] on their sides and give thought to the creation of the heavens and the earth, [saying], "Our Lord, You did not create this aimlessly; exalted are You [above such a thing]; then protect us from the punishment of the Fire.

    Quran 3:190-191

    My hope in posting these verses is to provide a sense of the importance Muhammad placed on knowledge and learning, but also the attitudes towards its acquisition and practice. There are no verses to would suggets this applies to men and not women.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Winner Winner x 1
  15. Wasp

    Wasp Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2019
    Messages:
    946
    Ratings:
    +221
    Not Muhammad, but allah.
     
  16. adrian009

    adrian009 Well-Known Member
    Staff Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2014
    Messages:
    8,202
    Ratings:
    +6,152
    Religion:
    Baha'i
    The source is Allah and the Messenger Muhammad, I agree.
     
  17. stvdv

    stvdv Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2018
    Messages:
    5,122
    Ratings:
    +2,764
    Religion:
    Sanathana Dharma [The Eternal Religion]
    Strange and unreal answer. I was wondering how an average "Muslim man" would think, and you answer for them - being a "Christian woman"
     
    • Like Like x 1
  18. sooda

    sooda Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2019
    Messages:
    10,808
    Ratings:
    +3,309
    Religion:
    Christian
    In some universities they sit in a different section or in an adjoining room with live tv and verbal exchanges with professors. On several campuses women have been driving for ten years.
     
  19. sooda

    sooda Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2019
    Messages:
    10,808
    Ratings:
    +3,309
    Religion:
    Christian
    I've had ample opportunity to ASK them face to face.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  20. Notanumber

    Notanumber A Free Man

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2016
    Messages:
    6,199
    Ratings:
    +1,351
    Religion:
    Literal liberalism
    Modern Britain should not be seen to support segregation of the sexes.

    It is setting a poor example as is allowing segregation in British Mosques.
     
Loading...