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In Search of a Label: Suggestions Welcome

Which Label do you think fits my description of my beliefs better?

  • Atheist

    Votes: 2 20.0%
  • Marxist-Atheist (Marx, Engels, Lenin, Stalin, Mao etc).

    Votes: 2 20.0%
  • Atheistic Left-Hand Path/Satanist

    Votes: 1 10.0%
  • Other

    Votes: 5 50.0%

  • Total voters
    10

Laika

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
Since I came to believe there was no god when I was about 5 or 6 years old (after having been introduced to the concept of "God" in primary school), I have always been an Atheist. However, in my experiences on Religious forums, I have found it profoundly difficult to relate to other atheists experiences and understanding.

For a very long time, my understanding of atheism was directly derived from Communism and Marxist materialism. I have always understood atheism as the conscious and deliberate denial of belief in the existence of any deity or belief in the supernatural as a whole. This is an indiscriminate atheism that affects all beliefs in deities and the supernatural. Moreover, it does not require evidence to assert that it is true; it just simply "is". It is a statement about the nature of reality that doesn't require proof to be true. the purpose of proof would more accurately be simply a means to rationalise the existing belief, rather than to decide it's validity. I have considered the possibility of Deism and Natural Theology as means to prove God exists, but only on the basis of "reason"- and reason doesn't and hasn't convinced me of anything in this area. It is closer to instinct, a belief so deeply held that it is almost physically impossible for me to imagine being anything other than it. Yes, I can empathise with believers and their experiences, but not with God being a physical or supernatural reality that has a direct personal effect on the course of my life.

Now, this is where the cliam I am an Atheist almost totally breaks down, as if god did exist, the position I'd take is most probably that God is responsible for the evil in the world and therefore is not worthy of worship or sanctification, but that there is a moral obligation to resist an evil deity. It would have to be a very forgiving and loving god to explain away all the suffering in the world to actually win my affection or loyalty. So if I did entertain a "theistic" belief, it is closer to "Misotheism" (hatred of god) or "Dystheism" (the belief that God is not wholly good or is in fact evil). I was particuarly strongly disposed to being Anti-Christian more than any other religion because of its cultural influence, but this was more to do with its dominance in the society I live in rather than singling it out (as I'd oppose all religions and deities given the opportunity). This treatment of religion as a basis for authoritarian social and political control means that the "hostility" towards religion has in the past, extended as far as sympathy for "State Atheism" in the past, namely that the forcible elimination of religion would be desirable as the elimination as a source of evil and suffering in the world. It was only slowly in time that I came to appreciate that there was no rational basis for justifying the use of force to compel others to believe as I did, nor that such compulsion was either desirable or effective. It would only add to the very cruelties and brutalities I originally opposed and would not make a better or more rational world.

In Marxism there was always an undercurrent on something called "God-Building" which treated Atheism/Socialism as something which had to satisfy the human desire for meaning and spirituality even in seeking to eliminate belief in the supernatural. In atheist philosophy, this fairly closely resembles some of the ideas of Fredrich Nietzsche, in that the "death of god" has a direct effect on morality. The denial of the existence of god, in this sense, also means the denial of the existence of a morality that could be derived from god. It can also draw inspiration from Existentialism and moral Nihilism as well. This tendency towards the criticism of moralities derived from religions means I have looked to develop moral views from non-religious sources, such as the Social Darwinist principle that Might is Right as well as a belief in the necessity of a "Sexual Revolution" against the sex-negative moralities that were sanctioned by religious authorities. In my case, being godless has raised questions about whether it is right to kill, steal or rape (in the abstract) in the absence of a transcendental morality, particularly as our actions are determined by our interests, our feelings and emotions and the power we have to determine the outcome of our actions in our favour. I don't run around doing any of these things, but there isn't any "moral" obligation to obey the law or observe the rules of society, beyond compassion, empathy, individual conscience and self-interest- which are not always very reliable ways of deciding right and wrong.

It should be fairly clear by now that I, in now way, resemble anything like the "New Atheists" (Dawkins, Harris, Hitchens and co) or the many "Agnostic Atheists" on this forum. I know that in starting this thread, I am throwing this wide open to the "define atheism" debate, but I figured that if I am to get along with people, I need to figure out what on earth is actually going on. Although I have distanced myself from Communism over the past year, the basic structure of this materialist-atheism remains the same, only I've started adopting more conservative views from a Social Darwinist view rather than revolutionary views from Marxist historical materialism.

If only to underline the differences further, my experience of "atheism" is deeply introspective and emotional. It is about passion, fury, rage, despair, awe, joy and love. There is so much intensity and colour in the world. Putting emotions right at the front of my "inner life" contrasts very sharply with the extent to which most atheists appear almost coldly logical and rationalistic. So, although I have no "religious" beliefs to speak of, the experience is intimately familiar and I relate and feel more comfortable around religious believers than I do my fellow non-believers. (Which is really confusing and perverse honestly.)

In my mind, given the extent of the hostility towards organised religion and god as sources of authoritarianism, my past flirtation with the desire to eliminate religious belief wholesale, the implications that the attack on religion has on morality and sexual taboos and paying only lip service to debates about trying to "prove" whether god exists or not, it would seem that I am closer to an atheistic satanist in pursuing a "left-hand path" that actively goes out of its way to undermine the "right-hand path" of organised religion- only most satanists are individualists and anti-communist, not collectivist with communist sympathies.

I know there clearly are limits to the use of a label, but would you therefore classify me more as an "Atheist", a "Marxist-Atheist" (the Stalin variety) or as part of the "Atheistic Left-hand path"? Or Something else entirely?
 

crossfire

LHP Mercuræn Feminist Heretic ☿
Premium Member
Marxist-Atheist and tribalism, imo. "Man makes god" (collectivist egregores) instead of "God makes man" (although tribalism can go both ways, with conquering and cultural assimilation, depending on how conscious or unconsious the process might be. I would say you are definitely more on the conscious side than the unconscious side, imo.)

Your mileage may vary.
 

crossfire

LHP Mercuræn Feminist Heretic ☿
Premium Member
Have you ever considered that your misotheism or dystheism might be directed towards the unconscious shadow egregore projections of a tribal collective? The best way to counter that is through the LHP of introspection--indentifying the collective nomos, bringing it into consciousness for examination and critique, separating your own thoughts and psychological hang-ups from it, and working on resolving your own unconscious psychological problems before they get projected out towards others and into collective egregores.
 

HonestJoe

Well-Known Member
I know there clearly are limits to the use of a label, but would you therefore classify me more as an "Atheist", a "Marxist-Atheist" (the Stalin variety) or as part of the "Atheistic Left-hand path"? Or Something else entirely?
"Human being"? "Laika"?

Why do you need any other label? You've already reached the realisation that none of the common labels really help since different people use or perceive them entirely differently and without context, abstract labels like these don't really mean anything anyway. For any situation that actually matters, you're going to need to explain your specific personal opinion on whatever the topic is. Simply saying "I am <X>" is only every going to raise more question than it answers.

Of course, I could just be saying that because I'm a socio-realist agnostic anarchist. ;)
 

Shadow Wolf

Certified People sTabber
When it comes to "religion" and such, I pretty much just quit using labels because no matter what I end up having to explain it and make attempts to correct false views they latched onto. I still use LHP, but even that one not often, because again I hate such things and I really have other things I'd rather do than set people straight over semantic bickering.
 

Darkforbid

Well-Known Member
It seem in the 'evil god' bit of your post. That you think in order to be good God should not allow free will
 

David T

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
[
I say maybe you are a heart of a poet over thinking it but getting there. We need poets of the landscape. Wendell berry poem.
The Peace of Wild Things

When despair for the world grows in me
and I wake in the night at the least sound
in fear of what my life and my children’s lives may be,
I go and lie down where the wood drake
rests in his beauty on the water, and the great heron feeds.
I come into the peace of wild things
who do not tax their lives with forethought
of grief. I come into the presence of still water.
And I feel above me the day-blind stars
waiting with their light. For a time
I rest in the grace of the world, and am free
 

Twilight Hue

Twilight, not bright nor dark, good nor bad.
Since I came to believe there was no god when I was about 5 or 6 years old (after having been introduced to the concept of "God" in primary school), I have always been an Atheist. However, in my experiences on Religious forums, I have found it profoundly difficult to relate to other atheists experiences and understanding.

For a very long time, my understanding of atheism was directly derived from Communism and Marxist materialism. I have always understood atheism as the conscious and deliberate denial of belief in the existence of any deity or belief in the supernatural as a whole. This is an indiscriminate atheism that affects all beliefs in deities and the supernatural. Moreover, it does not require evidence to assert that it is true; it just simply "is". It is a statement about the nature of reality that doesn't require proof to be true. the purpose of proof would more accurately be simply a means to rationalise the existing belief, rather than to decide it's validity. I have considered the possibility of Deism and Natural Theology as means to prove God exists, but only on the basis of "reason"- and reason doesn't and hasn't convinced me of anything in this area. It is closer to instinct, a belief so deeply held that it is almost physically impossible for me to imagine being anything other than it. Yes, I can empathise with believers and their experiences, but not with God being a physical or supernatural reality that has a direct personal effect on the course of my life.

Now, this is where the cliam I am an Atheist almost totally breaks down, as if god did exist, the position I'd take is most probably that God is responsible for the evil in the world and therefore is not worthy of worship or sanctification, but that there is a moral obligation to resist an evil deity. It would have to be a very forgiving and loving god to explain away all the suffering in the world to actually win my affection or loyalty. So if I did entertain a "theistic" belief, it is closer to "Misotheism" (hatred of god) or "Dystheism" (the belief that God is not wholly good or is in fact evil). I was particuarly strongly disposed to being Anti-Christian more than any other religion because of its cultural influence, but this was more to do with its dominance in the society I live in rather than singling it out (as I'd oppose all religions and deities given the opportunity). This treatment of religion as a basis for authoritarian social and political control means that the "hostility" towards religion has in the past, extended as far as sympathy for "State Atheism" in the past, namely that the forcible elimination of religion would be desirable as the elimination as a source of evil and suffering in the world. It was only slowly in time that I came to appreciate that there was no rational basis for justifying the use of force to compel others to believe as I did, nor that such compulsion was either desirable or effective. It would only add to the very cruelties and brutalities I originally opposed and would not make a better or more rational world.

In Marxism there was always an undercurrent on something called "God-Building" which treated Atheism/Socialism as something which had to satisfy the human desire for meaning and spirituality even in seeking to eliminate belief in the supernatural. In atheist philosophy, this fairly closely resembles some of the ideas of Fredrich Nietzsche, in that the "death of god" has a direct effect on morality. The denial of the existence of god, in this sense, also means the denial of the existence of a morality that could be derived from god. It can also draw inspiration from Existentialism and moral Nihilism as well. This tendency towards the criticism of moralities derived from religions means I have looked to develop moral views from non-religious sources, such as the Social Darwinist principle that Might is Right as well as a belief in the necessity of a "Sexual Revolution" against the sex-negative moralities that were sanctioned by religious authorities. In my case, being godless has raised questions about whether it is right to kill, steal or rape (in the abstract) in the absence of a transcendental morality, particularly as our actions are determined by our interests, our feelings and emotions and the power we have to determine the outcome of our actions in our favour. I don't run around doing any of these things, but there isn't any "moral" obligation to obey the law or observe the rules of society, beyond compassion, empathy, individual conscience and self-interest- which are not always very reliable ways of deciding right and wrong.

It should be fairly clear by now that I, in now way, resemble anything like the "New Atheists" (Dawkins, Harris, Hitchens and co) or the many "Agnostic Atheists" on this forum. I know that in starting this thread, I am throwing this wide open to the "define atheism" debate, but I figured that if I am to get along with people, I need to figure out what on earth is actually going on. Although I have distanced myself from Communism over the past year, the basic structure of this materialist-atheism remains the same, only I've started adopting more conservative views from a Social Darwinist view rather than revolutionary views from Marxist historical materialism.

If only to underline the differences further, my experience of "atheism" is deeply introspective and emotional. It is about passion, fury, rage, despair, awe, joy and love. There is so much intensity and colour in the world. Putting emotions right at the front of my "inner life" contrasts very sharply with the extent to which most atheists appear almost coldly logical and rationalistic. So, although I have no "religious" beliefs to speak of, the experience is intimately familiar and I relate and feel more comfortable around religious believers than I do my fellow non-believers. (Which is really confusing and perverse honestly.)

In my mind, given the extent of the hostility towards organised religion and god as sources of authoritarianism, my past flirtation with the desire to eliminate religious belief wholesale, the implications that the attack on religion has on morality and sexual taboos and paying only lip service to debates about trying to "prove" whether god exists or not, it would seem that I am closer to an atheistic satanist in pursuing a "left-hand path" that actively goes out of its way to undermine the "right-hand path" of organised religion- only most satanists are individualists and anti-communist, not collectivist with communist sympathies.

I know there clearly are limits to the use of a label, but would you therefore classify me more as an "Atheist", a "Marxist-Atheist" (the Stalin variety) or as part of the "Atheistic Left-hand path"? Or Something else entirely?
It's pretty simple. Just say you're one without God's.
 

Enoch07

It's all a sick freaking joke.
Premium Member
Which is really confusing and perverse honestly.)

Not really, at least in my experience. I usually get along with non-Christians better than I do with Christians or the other 2 Abrahamic religons, even though I am Christian myself.

Part of it I suspect is the "opposites attract" component of our sociology. Some of us more individualistic characters don't fit in quite so well with collectivist and their ideologies. So I think you probably are just an atheist individualist. You forge your own path only loosely adhering to the words that others would define you by, even though you don't define yourself in any specific way. Imho
 

LuisDantas

Aura of atheification
Premium Member
I don't think plain atheism has the needed nuance, @Laika . And I do not picture you as much of a LHP person... much too oriented towards what others do, IMO. For the moment I would go with Marxist-Atheist.
 

Neutral Name

Active Member
Since I came to believe there was no god when I was about 5 or 6 years old (after having been introduced to the concept of "God" in primary school), I have always been an Atheist. However, in my experiences on Religious forums, I have found it profoundly difficult to relate to other atheists experiences and understanding.

For a very long time, my understanding of atheism was directly derived from Communism and Marxist materialism. I have always understood atheism as the conscious and deliberate denial of belief in the existence of any deity or belief in the supernatural as a whole. This is an indiscriminate atheism that affects all beliefs in deities and the supernatural. Moreover, it does not require evidence to assert that it is true; it just simply "is". It is a statement about the nature of reality that doesn't require proof to be true. the purpose of proof would more accurately be simply a means to rationalise the existing belief, rather than to decide it's validity. I have considered the possibility of Deism and Natural Theology as means to prove God exists, but only on the basis of "reason"- and reason doesn't and hasn't convinced me of anything in this area. It is closer to instinct, a belief so deeply held that it is almost physically impossible for me to imagine being anything other than it. Yes, I can empathise with believers and their experiences, but not with God being a physical or supernatural reality that has a direct personal effect on the course of my life.

Now, this is where the cliam I am an Atheist almost totally breaks down, as if god did exist, the position I'd take is most probably that God is responsible for the evil in the world and therefore is not worthy of worship or sanctification, but that there is a moral obligation to resist an evil deity. It would have to be a very forgiving and loving god to explain away all the suffering in the world to actually win my affection or loyalty. So if I did entertain a "theistic" belief, it is closer to "Misotheism" (hatred of god) or "Dystheism" (the belief that God is not wholly good or is in fact evil). I was particuarly strongly disposed to being Anti-Christian more than any other religion because of its cultural influence, but this was more to do with its dominance in the society I live in rather than singling it out (as I'd oppose all religions and deities given the opportunity). This treatment of religion as a basis for authoritarian social and political control means that the "hostility" towards religion has in the past, extended as far as sympathy for "State Atheism" in the past, namely that the forcible elimination of religion would be desirable as the elimination as a source of evil and suffering in the world. It was only slowly in time that I came to appreciate that there was no rational basis for justifying the use of force to compel others to believe as I did, nor that such compulsion was either desirable or effective. It would only add to the very cruelties and brutalities I originally opposed and would not make a better or more rational world.

In Marxism there was always an undercurrent on something called "God-Building" which treated Atheism/Socialism as something which had to satisfy the human desire for meaning and spirituality even in seeking to eliminate belief in the supernatural. In atheist philosophy, this fairly closely resembles some of the ideas of Fredrich Nietzsche, in that the "death of god" has a direct effect on morality. The denial of the existence of god, in this sense, also means the denial of the existence of a morality that could be derived from god. It can also draw inspiration from Existentialism and moral Nihilism as well. This tendency towards the criticism of moralities derived from religions means I have looked to develop moral views from non-religious sources, such as the Social Darwinist principle that Might is Right as well as a belief in the necessity of a "Sexual Revolution" against the sex-negative moralities that were sanctioned by religious authorities. In my case, being godless has raised questions about whether it is right to kill, steal or rape (in the abstract) in the absence of a transcendental morality, particularly as our actions are determined by our interests, our feelings and emotions and the power we have to determine the outcome of our actions in our favour. I don't run around doing any of these things, but there isn't any "moral" obligation to obey the law or observe the rules of society, beyond compassion, empathy, individual conscience and self-interest- which are not always very reliable ways of deciding right and wrong.

It should be fairly clear by now that I, in now way, resemble anything like the "New Atheists" (Dawkins, Harris, Hitchens and co) or the many "Agnostic Atheists" on this forum. I know that in starting this thread, I am throwing this wide open to the "define atheism" debate, but I figured that if I am to get along with people, I need to figure out what on earth is actually going on. Although I have distanced myself from Communism over the past year, the basic structure of this materialist-atheism remains the same, only I've started adopting more conservative views from a Social Darwinist view rather than revolutionary views from Marxist historical materialism.

If only to underline the differences further, my experience of "atheism" is deeply introspective and emotional. It is about passion, fury, rage, despair, awe, joy and love. There is so much intensity and colour in the world. Putting emotions right at the front of my "inner life" contrasts very sharply with the extent to which most atheists appear almost coldly logical and rationalistic. So, although I have no "religious" beliefs to speak of, the experience is intimately familiar and I relate and feel more comfortable around religious believers than I do my fellow non-believers. (Which is really confusing and perverse honestly.)

In my mind, given the extent of the hostility towards organised religion and god as sources of authoritarianism, my past flirtation with the desire to eliminate religious belief wholesale, the implications that the attack on religion has on morality and sexual taboos and paying only lip service to debates about trying to "prove" whether god exists or not, it would seem that I am closer to an atheistic satanist in pursuing a "left-hand path" that actively goes out of its way to undermine the "right-hand path" of organised religion- only most satanists are individualists and anti-communist, not collectivist with communist sympathies.

I know there clearly are limits to the use of a label, but would you therefore classify me more as an "Atheist", a "Marxist-Atheist" (the Stalin variety) or as part of the "Atheistic Left-hand path"? Or Something else entirely?

I think that you are a seeker. You are trying to find the truth. I have spent most of my life doing that. I still might change my mind again. I'm always happy to listen to new ideas as long as the people are civil.
 

David1967

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
I chose 'other' believing that you, like me are a work in progress. The only constant is change.
 

beenherebeforeagain

Rogue Animist
Premium Member
[
I say maybe you are a heart of a poet over thinking it but getting there. We need poets of the landscape. Wendell berry poem.
The Peace of Wild Things

When despair for the world grows in me
and I wake in the night at the least sound
in fear of what my life and my children’s lives may be,
I go and lie down where the wood drake
rests in his beauty on the water, and the great heron feeds.
I come into the peace of wild things
who do not tax their lives with forethought
of grief. I come into the presence of still water.
And I feel above me the day-blind stars
waiting with their light. For a time
I rest in the grace of the world, and am free
love Wendell Berry!
 

David T

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
I chose 'other' believing that you, like me are a work in progress. The only constant is change.
Love heraclitus.

He said "the logos is common but everyone seems to have there own understanding."

Hell he would steo into modernity and say its even more private understanding than then!

What happens when someone only has ther own private understanding and nnobody understands? Insanity.
 

Stevicus

Veteran Member
Staff member
Premium Member
I know there clearly are limits to the use of a label, but would you therefore classify me more as an "Atheist", a "Marxist-Atheist" (the Stalin variety) or as part of the "Atheistic Left-hand path"? Or Something else entirely?

I try not to get too hung up on labels. I suppose I would generally fall into the far-left camp on various political issues, although I don't really know what label I would use either.

But I generally don't accept whatever labels anyone else would put on me either.
 

Saint Frankenstein

From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free!
Premium Member
You sound like a moral nihilist and your beliefs are similar to individualist anarchism or egoism. Egoist anarchism - Wikipedia

Sounds like you'd like some of Ayn Rand's and Anton LaVey's ideas, too. So I'd say you're closer to atheist LHP now.
 

Laika

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
Have you ever considered that your misotheism or dystheism might be directed towards the unconscious shadow egregore projections of a tribal collective? The best way to counter that is through the LHP of introspection--indentifying the collective nomos, bringing it into consciousness for examination and critique, separating your own thoughts and psychological hang-ups from it, and working on resolving your own unconscious psychological problems before they get projected out towards others and into collective egregores.

Its more than possible that it is the projection of an unconscious conflict of sorts. But I believe that opposing god, if he or she existed, is necessary to be free. Perhaps a deity is loving and forgiving, but it is hard to say in the affirmative.

"Human being"? "Laika"?

Why do you need any other label? You've already reached the realisation that none of the common labels really help since different people use or perceive them entirely differently and without context, abstract labels like these don't really mean anything anyway. For any situation that actually matters, you're going to need to explain your specific personal opinion on whatever the topic is. Simply saying "I am <X>" is only every going to raise more question than it answers.

Of course, I could just be saying that because I'm a socio-realist agnostic anarchist. ;)

I believe there is no innate purpose, direction or meaning in being human. It is something that has to be found, discovered in the world or else invented in our ideas. I think once I might have wanted a label because it came out of a desire to be special, now the reverse may be true. There is a humility in a label, in not being so infinite as to be beyond description but someone who is finite and can be known. True, labels can be prejudicial, but we are all more complicated than being human even if that is where we all begin.

It seem in the 'evil god' bit of your post. That you think in order to be good God should not allow free will

Maybe I am more of a misanthrope than I give myself credit for, but if I may hate god for the evils mankind has done to each other, it would be for our strong tendency to lack imagination and sympathy. The problem isn’t free will, only that god seems to have been such a poor teacher for how to use it. Maybe its our fault for not listening hard enough.

This post is going to have a lot of assumptions in it about you, I hope it is welcome as we have talked of this in the past.

I don't see how you depart from Marxist atheism at all.

To be honest it seems to me that you've distanced yourself from Communism from getting burned out / social pressure and isolation rather than distancing yourself from it because you have reason to think Communist positions are incorrect. Perhaps you are trying to find comfort in non-marxist positions, to avoid some unpleasant conclusions?

Sorry if I am reading to much into things. Let me know what you think.

Your assumptions are spot on. ;)

As much as I have tried to walk away from Marxist-Atheism, it never completely disappears. It just gets more subtle and harder to recognise but is still there in some form. In the cruelty of what happened under communism, there are many of conclusions I would want to avoid. The social pressures are deeply unpleasant, particularly as people do not want to believe the world is as unjust as it seems to be. They condemn communism readily and often instantly, whereas capitalism is often criticised more reluctantly as a “natural” condition, and then don’t seem to do much beyond criticise.

Saying I am burned out would be very fair. After so many years falling off the horse, you just don’t want to get back on even if you should.

You sound like a moral nihilist and your beliefs are similar to individualist anarchism or egoism. Egoist anarchism - Wikipedia

Sounds like you'd like some of Ayn Rand's and Anton LaVey's ideas, too. So I'd say you're closer to atheist LHP now.

They have certainly been an influence, but Rand was strongly against dialectics (marxist or not), so her philosophy are unforgiving, uncompromising and dogmatic even with its insights. LaVeys ideas did introduce me to “might is right” social darwinism, but that is predicated on defining certain people are “strong” or “weak” based on success, when it seems those who “succeed” are morally inferior for having an easy life and taking everything for granted and those who “fail” have a resilience and determination to keep trying. Definitely an element of LHP but its not the same as the whole as far as I can see it.
 

Laika

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
[
I say maybe you are a heart of a poet over thinking it but getting there. We need poets of the landscape. Wendell berry poem.
The Peace of Wild Things

When despair for the world grows in me
and I wake in the night at the least sound
in fear of what my life and my children’s lives may be,
I go and lie down where the wood drake
rests in his beauty on the water, and the great heron feeds.
I come into the peace of wild things
who do not tax their lives with forethought
of grief. I come into the presence of still water.
And I feel above me the day-blind stars
waiting with their light. For a time
I rest in the grace of the world, and am free

I confess I will take being called a poet as a compliment. I have wanted to be a writer for many years, but lack the dedication to the craft to actually sit down and practice the skill. :D
 
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