1. Welcome to Religious Forums, a friendly forum to discuss all religions in a friendly surrounding.

    Your voice is missing! You will need to register to get access to the following site features:
    • Reply to discussions and create your own threads.
    • Our modern chat room. No add-ons or extensions required, just login and start chatting!
    • Access to private conversations with other members.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon!

Featured Are You a Convert?

Discussion in 'General Religious Debates' started by SalixIncendium, Jan 24, 2019.

  1. SalixIncendium

    SalixIncendium Resident Hermit
    Staff Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2016
    Messages:
    4,780
    Ratings:
    +4,890
    Religion:
    Advaitist Hindu
    Have you converted to a religion different from that of your upbringing, or were you raised into a religion that you've since abandoned? Were you raised without religion and have found a religion that brings you solace?

    Where did you start, what was the process, and what was the catalyst for the change?
     
    • Like Like x 3
  2. Ray Warren

    Ray Warren There is beauty in the silence.

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2018
    Messages:
    783
    Ratings:
    +433
    Religion:
    A Quaker with Christian beliefs
    I was raised Christian but not Quaker. Fell in love with the religion how could I not convert when I believed it?When it called for me so strongly?
     
    • Like Like x 2
  3. Skwim

    Skwim Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2010
    Messages:
    24,460
    Ratings:
    +8,962
    Religion:
    Agnostic
    Yes. I converted from Christianity to agnosticism. I was raised a nominal Christian, even baptised in the Lutheran church.

    The process was one grounded in rationality and logic. The catalyst was the book: Why I am Not a Christian by Bertrand Russell.

    .
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  4. Nakosis

    Nakosis crystal soldier
    Premium Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2011
    Messages:
    10,983
    Ratings:
    +3,898
    Religion:
    Antipolitician
    Converted to several religions after Christianity. What triggered me to leave one religions for another was usually what I saw as immoral behavior from the church leader. I suppose I expected that someone teaching the "truth" should be of moral character.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Informative Informative x 1
  5. Unveiled Artist

    Unveiled Artist Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2014
    Messages:
    23,815
    Ratings:
    +7,815
    Yes and no. I wasn't raised religious (atheist household). Went to church cause my mother wanted a "Braddy Bunch" family. I studied christianity and scripture until I went to Mass with a Catholic friend. Jumped seven years ago to be a Catholic. Left two years ago today.

    The cornerstone of the drop out was I never believed jesus as god and never believed in a deity; not my reality.

    Buddhism is a whole 'nother story. I can't drop facts; so, there was no conversion either way just choice in practice.

    :herb: Catalyst for change?

    Art. Meditation. Observation. Understanding. Study. Experience.

    I never had all of these at once in The Dharma nor christianity.
     
  6. Salvador

    Salvador Conscious Being

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2015
    Messages:
    2,618
    Ratings:
    +784
    Religion:
    Matrixism and Swedenborgianism
    I'm a former Christian, who is now a follower of Matrixism. The movie the Matrix, along with indicators we are living in a simulated reality has convinced me Matrixism is a true religion.

    A "machine" is any causal physical system, hence we are machines; thus, machines can be conscious. The question is: What type of machines could be conscious? Odds are robots passing the Turing Test Turing test - Wikipedia would be indistinguishable from us in their behavioral capacities --and could be conscious (i.e. feel), but we can never be certain. There's no way for any "conscious" being to know whether or not he is actually experiencing a virtual reality produced by an interface between his brain and a computer .

    However, there are some possible indications we are living in a computer simulation....

    1. A particle passing through a double-slit behaves as a wave causing an interference pattern when unobserved, but this same particle doesn't create an interference pattern when its path of travel can be determined by an observer. This collapse of the wave-function could be happening in order to save computational resources necessary for our simulated reality.

    2. There is indeed a mark of intelligence left in our genetic code as evident by how the numeric and semantic message of 037 appears in our genetic code. Each codon relates to 3 other particular codons having the same particular type of initial nucleobase and sequential nucleobase subsequently then followed by a different ending nucleobase. Half of these 4 set of codon groups ( whole family codons ) each code for the same particular amino acid. The other half of those 4 set of codon groups ( split codons ) don't code for the same amino acid. So then, in the case of whole family codons, there are 37 amino acid peptide chain nucleons for each relevant nucleobase determinant of how a particular amino acid gets coded. Start codons express 0 at the beginning of 37 Hence, the meaningful numeric and semantic message of 037 gets unambiguously and factually conveyed to us descendants of our cosmic ancestor(s) with our genetic code invented by a superior intelligence beyond that of anybody presently bound to Earth.

    Reference: The "Wow! signal" of the terrestrial genetic code. Vladimir l. shCherbak and Maxim A. Makukov. Icarus, May 2013,Redirectinghttps://www.scribd.com/document/35302916...netic-Code

    This mark of intelligence left in our genetic coding is indicative of an intelligent designer, who may be responsible for the simulation of our reality.

    3. Theoretical physicist Dr. S. James Gates Jr. has revealved that a certain string theory, super-symmetrical equations describing the nature and reality of our universe, contains embedded computer codes; these codes have digital data in the form of 0's and 1's identical to what makes web browsers function, and they're error-correct codes.



    At least one of the following statements is very likely to be true:

    1. The human species is very likely to go extinct before reaching a post-human stage.
    2. Any post-human civilization is extremely unlikely to run a significant number of simulations of their evolutionary history.
    3. We are almost certainly living in a computer simulation.

    "Bostrom's argument rests on the premise that given sufficiently advanced technology, it is possible to represent the populated surface of the Earth without recourse to digital physics; that the qualia experienced by a simulated consciousness are comparable or equivalent to those of a naturally occurring human consciousness, and that one or more levels of simulation within simulations would be feasible given only a modest expenditure of computational resources in the real world."

    ARE YOU LIVING IN A COMPUTER SIMULATION? BY NICK BOSTROM

    Faculty of Philosophy, Oxford University

    Published in Philosophical Quarterly (2003) Vol. 53, No. 211, pp. 243-255.

    Are You Living in a Simulation

    I took the red pill knowing there is no turning back. I didn't take the blue pill, because I didn't want the story to end, then waking up in bed and simply believing whatever I want to believe. I took the red pill for staying in Wonderland and getting shown how deep the rabbit-hole goes.


    [​IMG]

    After taking the red pill, I watched the below video about possible evidence of us living in a simulated reality.


     
    #6 Salvador, Jan 24, 2019
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2019
  7. Landon Caeli

    Landon Caeli What's your stoyle?

    Joined:
    May 12, 2018
    Messages:
    2,373
    Ratings:
    +765
    Religion:
    Catholic
    Nah, I'd never convert. Never had a desire to my whole life.
     
  8. Tony Bristow-Stagg

    Tony Bristow-Stagg A World Citizen
    Premium Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2017
    Messages:
    5,601
    Ratings:
    +2,302
    Religion:
    Baha'i
    My Mother is Christain and my Father's Mother was a Christain. I never practiced Christianity.

    I embraced the Baha'i Faith after my wife accepted it.

    We were raised with Christain based virtues, I found all Faiths have these virtues.

    I started by being made aware there was a Baha'i Faith and then reading about it and meeting people that practiced the Faith.

    The process was accepting that Bahau'llah was the Manifestation of God for this day and had revealled Laws that we are to try to live by. Thus the process never ends, it becomes a way of life where continual improvement is identified.

    I see this was acceptance that humanity is One human race, under One God and that Unity is urgently needed.

    Regards Tony
     
    • Like Like x 2
  9. Vinayaka

    Vinayaka devotee
    Premium Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2011
    Messages:
    26,218
    Ratings:
    +10,739
    Religion:
    Saivite Hindu
    No religion, Hinduism found me, through personal experiences. (The catalyst) Been at it for about 45 years now. The first experience was on a swather in an open field of barley. The process was slowly realising that these experiences matched Hinduism. I think I got the wrong address between lives, and had to correct the error.

    But really, who knows?
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  10. Shadow Wolf

    Shadow Wolf Crazy Diamond

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2005
    Messages:
    48,357
    Ratings:
    +15,352
    Religion:
    God is in the Rain
    I am an apostate of Christianity, and I sort of "outgrew" my former Pagan beliefs rather than actively rejecting it like I did Christianity, and I eventually found myself a convert to agnosticism (more of a philosophical journey), and to the LHP.
     
  11. shunyadragon

    shunyadragon Well-Known Member
    Premium Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2017
    Messages:
    8,698
    Ratings:
    +3,679
    Religion:
    Baha'i Faith
    I was raised in the Roman Church in an Irish family. As a teenager I began practicing Martial Arts (Arts of the Way) and studied Buddhism and Taoism. I am still a student of Buddhism, Taoism and Arts of the Way. I studied different religions and belief systems, and traveled around the world. I became a Baha'i in 1970, and everything remains in pencil. I grew up in Costa Rica and met my first Baha'is there when I was young. In general I was also close to UU and Quaker, because in Latin America the Baha'is, UU, and the Quakers were a breath of fresh air and sanity in a world dominated by the Roman Church and the Ugly American Evangelists. Recent visits found it is still the case with modern twists. My 'tool box' is science, and exploring the beliefs of the world as to; 'Why do people believe as they do?'.
     
    #11 shunyadragon, Jan 24, 2019
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2019
    • Like Like x 2
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  12. adrian009

    adrian009 Well-Known Member
    Staff Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2014
    Messages:
    6,811
    Ratings:
    +4,776
    Religion:
    Baha'i
    I grew up Christian (Presbyterian) and converted to the Baha'i Faith in my mid 20s. I spent a period of about 5 years exploring differing ideologies including reconnecting to my Christian roots, atheism, Buddhism and Hinduism.

    My experience with both Christianity or the Baha'i Faith is both faiths brought me strength, inspiration as well as solace. Atheism for a while seemed to make more sense but lacked what religion could provide.

    Existential dysphoria in my early 20s and wanting to make better sense of the universe. I started with what I knew (Christianity and agnosticism) and started looking further afield when my needs weren't met.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  13. Nowhere Man

    Nowhere Man Bompu Zen Man with a little bit of Bushido.

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2009
    Messages:
    19,856
    Ratings:
    +7,113
    Religion:
    Zen Buddhism
    I don't know if conversion would be the best word to describe my change from Christianity to Zen Buddhism.

    It's more like coming home to what had always been there since the start of my escapades and adventures in faith based religions.

    I guess over the course of time, some people can only take so much of trying to live in a fantasy and make-believe world before reality eventually makes its inevitable wake up call once you notice that the rose colors and stained glass windows you are living in, suddenly isn't looking as rosy and colorful as when things were new and fresh compulsing one to crack open the door and take a peek outside the door that you previously walked in......
     
  14. Terese

    Terese Mangalam Pundarikakshah
    Staff Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2015
    Messages:
    3,363
    Ratings:
    +3,068
    Religion:
    Sanatana Dharma
    I was raised in a Muslim family but we were majorly secular. Not much talk of religion. I became an agnostic atheist at 13, having no interest in religions. Then when i was nearing my 19th birthday i had become a huge fan of The Beatles. George Harrison was my favourite of the group and was intrigued by his interests, including Indian spirituality, which i had no prior knowledge of. I then began to read up on it and soon discovered a quote from the Upanishads. I cannot recall it verbatim but it was along the lines of Brahman is the universe/all pervasive Supreme and the atma (soul) is eternal and is Brahman. I thought this quote very profound, and i decided to go to Google images and look up Hinduism. As soon as i laid eyes of Lord Vishnu, an inexplicit attraction was felt by me. It was a true joy to learn of him and his form and is still today. Quickly soon after i discovered there was a religion dedicated to him called Vaishnavism, were many sampradayas (denominations) and each having their own interpretation of the link between atma and Brahman. Sri Vaishnavism and Visistadvaita leapt out to me, as i did not agree with the dualism of Dvaita Vedanta and the non-dualism of Advaita Vedanta.

    Soon after i discovered RF as i saw there was a Vaishnava community there. Unfortunately there isn't much now, but i stay here for the friends and viewpoints :)

    I see Vaishnavism as truth, which gives me solace. I did not seek solace as i was perfectly fine with being who i was pre-"conversion". It definitely was an interesting few months contemplating my new found religiosity and abandoned atheism. But once i became a Vaishnava, i had little interest in going back. Theism is very fun to me and i feel blessed that i get to love all words of beautiful wisdom that exalt Narayana, his forms, and his devotees :)
     
    #14 Terese, Jan 24, 2019
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2019
    • Like Like x 4
    • Friendly Friendly x 2
  15. Brickjectivity

    Brickjectivity holy roly poly
    Staff Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2012
    Messages:
    23,007
    Ratings:
    +6,657
    Religion:
    Liberal Christian almost quaker
    baptized Charismatic Pentecostal for 20
    not attending 4 months
    Baptist 1 year
    Christadelphian 7-10 years
    not attending 11 years
    Quaker visitor 1 year
    not attending 1 year
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. LuisDantas

    LuisDantas Aura of atheification
    Staff Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2008
    Messages:
    43,920
    Ratings:
    +13,057
    Religion:
    Advocate of letting go of theism. Buddhist with an emphasis on personal understanding.
    Conversion is probably not the correct word. My upbringing was not very interested in my actual beliefs.

    I was raised in a vaguely catholic environment which later turned decisively spiritist.

    People decided on my behalf (without as much as asking how I would like it) that I should be subject to Catholic Eucharisty. At the time I did not know enough to try and resist. It just never meant anything to me; I did not even have a working awareness of Catholic doctrine at the time.

    Kardecist Spiritism was roughly that the same time thrown at me furiously (many Spiritists have an unlikely yet popular sort-of-syncretic attitude towards Catholicism). But to say that I never had it as part of my beliefs is an understatement. My raisers were fiercely adamant in pushing it down my throat, but they never had a chance. Their fits were fearsome all the same.

    It was actually being grown up enough to openly declare my atheism that brought me an interest in religion. First Taoism, then Buddhism (which finally taught me of the Christian Gospels, ironically enough).

    For a few years, in direct challenge to the hostile attitude of the raisers who actually introduced me to it, I took part in a troubled yet nonetheless horizon-expanding occultist group of SAW Gnosis. I would not recommend that, but it happened to me and had its upsides.

    Hinduism came a bit later and, in a sense, has grown since, although my adherence has never been quite straight.

    For a brief while I flirted with the Bahai Faith, before realizing that they were just too tied to Abrahamic theism to suit me.

    I guess I am not very typical of Brazilians, or even of atheist Brazilians (who tend to presume religion to be generally similar to Christianity and to require theism).

    While I have definitely been raised in a culture that presumed monotheism and expected as much as well as at least nominal adherence to Christianity, it was just all too evident that those beliefs where not expect to mean anything of significance. In retrospect, I thought of them as popular myths, not entirely dissimilar to the soap operas that so mobilized Brazilians of that time period. It shocked me to learn that there were, in fact, people who thought of Jesus as not only a real, historical person but also of the belief in his existence as Very Important. I flat out disbelieved it when first told that there were people who thought of him as divine. In retrospect, it just did not come across from the way that people talked about him. Superman was probably a far better realized avatar of the Sacred than Jesus at that point in my personal experience.

    It took exposure to Taoism, later Buddhism and Hinduism, to actually teach me what religion (more specifically Dharma) would be all about. Before that it was all just white noise that even most believers tended to find inconvenient.

    That may have been a contributing factor. I found the attachment to the noise intriguing, because it seemed so aimless and pointless. That led to reflection, which led to agnosticism, then atheism, then a genuine interest in religion.

    To this day most people around me can't make heads or tails of my stance. Oddly, most seem to expect me to reject religion yet embrace God-belief instead of the other way around.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  17. Jumi

    Jumi Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2014
    Messages:
    9,606
    Ratings:
    +5,219
    Religion:
    Secular theist (none)
    No, I haven't converted. Not even to the religion of my upbringing, so I haven't converted away from anything either.
     
  18. Muffled

    Muffled Jesus in me

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Messages:
    14,298
    Ratings:
    +802
    Religion:
    Christian
    I believe I was brought up a Baptist and attended church but that only made me a nominal Christian. When I received Jesus as Lord and Savior I converted to real Christianity.

    I believe I was not searching s thee is no start on my part. My start came from a Christian cousin who seemed to be off base biblically but I had not read the whole Bible.

    I believe the process started by reading the Bible taking my Sunday School teachers advice by starting with the Book of John. I only got to chapter three to see there was a spiritual reality and that I needed to be born again.
     
  19. Muffled

    Muffled Jesus in me

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Messages:
    14,298
    Ratings:
    +802
    Religion:
    Christian
    I believe when I attended Friends meetings there was never communion and I missed it sorely.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  20. Muffled

    Muffled Jesus in me

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Messages:
    14,298
    Ratings:
    +802
    Religion:
    Christian
    I believe you were converted by a book written by a man away from a book inspired by God. That doesn't sound logical to me.
     
Loading...