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The first living thing could not have come into being by random chance, therefore, God Almighty created all things. Just 1 proof.

Eddi

Agnostic
Premium Member
It sure does.

Religion is just a belief as to how we got here, where we will end up and what should we do in the mean time.
That's a part of what a religion is, sure

But a religion is many more than just those things

And evolution does not have those things in common with religion

Just because you want it to be a religion doesn't make it one I'm afraid
 

SavedByTheLord

Well-Known Member
That's a part of what a religion is, sure

But a religion is many more than just those things

And evolution does not have those things in common with religion

Just because you want it to be a religion doesn't make it one I'm afraid
It sure does as liberal society which is part of the religion of evolution is spewing out its dogma of how everyone should act, speak, and think.
 

Eddi

Agnostic
Premium Member
It sure does as liberal society which is part of the religion of evolution is spewing out its dogma of how everyone should act, speak, and think.
How is evolution Liberal?

It is politically neutral, it is true regardless of anyone's political beliefs

And how on Earth does the theory of evolution tell people how to act, speak, and think?????

I think you meant to say that it interfers with fundamentalist Christianity's efforts to tell everyone how to act, speak, and think????
 

gnostic

The Lost One
A first living creature would have to have had at least 100,000 amino acids in a particular sequence. This is extremely generous. The smallest free-living thing has over 1,300,000 base pairs. I also have not included having over 500 million other atoms in it.

The odds against a sequence of 100,000 amino acids (20 types, 39 counting handedness) coming to be by random chance is (10 to the 160,000 power) to 1. That could never have happened anywhere in the universe over the supposed 13.7 billion years of its existence. It actually is impossible because no concentration of that amount of amino acids would happen by random chance. There are other factors that make it impossible. It would be a miracle.Where would such an amount of amino acids even occur in nature to even make a first creature? They must be in very near proximity to where the first creature came to be. In water they would immediately diluted and chemical reactions would destroy it. And above ground or in space, it would be destroyed by the the sunlight. So the first creature is impossible.

All of these numbers are without contexts.

where do you get these utter craps from…where do you get this “100,000 amino acids” from?

Now unless you can give a specific sequence, the numbers are just distractions, smoke and mirrors strawman.

which sequence are you talking about? What is this sequence supposed to do? Without naming the name of sequence, your number is meaningless.

And beside all that…there only about over 500 known types of amino acids. Of those >500, only 22 types of amino acids are required, to form in number different types of proteins. It is these 22 types of amino acids that are building blocks of proteins.

So unless you name a specific protein, then -
  • you don’t know what sequence required to form that proteins;
  • you don’t know how many specific “types” amino acids require in that “sequence”;
  • nor would you know how many total amino acids, to form the sequence of that particular protein.

There are many types of proteins, and they each have their own specific characteristics and functions. Depending on the particular protein, the numbers of amino acids would verify. But it hard to say, WHEN YOU CANNOT EVEN NAME THE SEQUENCE or WHEN YOU CANNOT NAME THE PROTEIN.

In the OP, you have left sequences as vague as possible. What sequences are talking about? Which one? If you cannot tell us, then like I said, your 100,000 amino acids are just smoke and mirrors, to distract us with meaningless numbers and to hide the fact that you are a science illiterate…or more precisely, to hide the fact that you’re a biology illiterate.
 
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Subduction Zone

Veteran Member

metis

aged ecumenical anthropologist
No liberalism is a religion.
It is certainly not liberal as being for freedom.
It is totalitarian.

You invent your own definitions. Here's the reality:
Liberalism is a political and moral philosophy based on the rights of the individual, liberty, consent of the governed, political equality, right to private property and equality before the law.[1][2][3] Liberals espouse various views depending on their understanding of these principles but generally support private property, market economies, individual rights (including civil rights and human rights), liberal democracy, secularism, rule of law, economic and political freedom, freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of assembly, and freedom of religion,[2][4][5][6][7][8][9][10] constitutional government and privacy rights.[11] Liberalism is frequently cited as the dominant ideology of modern history. -- Liberalism - Wikipedia
 

metis

aged ecumenical anthropologist
From the Oxford Dictionary:
lib·er·al
[ˈlib(ə)rəl]

ADJECTIVE
liberal (adjective) · Liberal (adjective)

  1. willing to respect or accept behavior or opinions different from one's own; open to new ideas:
    "they have more liberal views toward marriage and divorce than some people"

    • (in a political context) favoring policies that are socially progressive and promote social welfare. Often contrasted with conservative.
      "they favor liberal ideologies over conservative ones"
    • THEOLOGY
      regarding many traditional beliefs as dispensable, invalidated by modern thought, or liable to change.
  2. relating to or denoting a political and social philosophy that promotes individual rights, civil liberties, democracy, and free enterprise:
    "a liberal democratic state"...
 
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