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Featured The biogeographic evidence for evolution

Discussion in 'Evolution Vs. Creationism' started by Hubert Farnsworth, Sep 7, 2019.

  1. BilliardsBall

    BilliardsBall Well-Known Member

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    I'd be more concerned if it wasn't for three facts:

    1) Archaeology contributes to history that evolves over time--the history five centuries BC is in flux, still

    2) Archaelogy has verified many Bible events (for example, years ago you'd say there's no 5-porticoed pool at Bethesda, no Pool of Siloam, no Hezekiah's tunnel, no King Solomon (we have his border markers), etc., etc.

    3) Whoever wrote the Book of Daniel was prescient, even dated to Hasmonean times--predict Jesus's death, predicts the splitting of Rome into Rome and Byzantium, etc.
     
  2. GardenLady

    GardenLady Member

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    EvangelicalHumanist wrote: "And you are not paying attention to the simplest fact of all --- only one of those species is still here. Travel the world, and find a single example of the genus "homo" that is not also of the species " H. sapiens."

    I know I'm quoting a post from last year, but just wanted to toss this in. Participating in the National Geographic "Genographic" DNA study, I got some interesting results. Among them is that my DNA is 2.4% Neanderthal and 2.5% Denisovan. So while I am H. sapiens (and 100% Irish and Scottish, per ancestry.com), remnants of these previous Homo species that have died out are still with me genetically.
     
  3. exchemist

    exchemist Well-Known Member

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    Yes, this I gather is common among Europeans. (One in the eye for the racists, actually, since Africans don't seem to have these traces of Neanderthal ancestry!)

    But Neanderthals are regarded by some as a Homo sapiens subspecies, rather than a different species. At any rate they evidently are close enough to have been able to interbreed with H sapiens sapiens.
     
  4. GardenLady

    GardenLady Member

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    @exchemist, my guess is that people in Africa with either Neanderthal or Denisovan DNA have European colonists in their genetic background or come from families where one or more ancestors lived in Europe or North American and they or their descendants returned to Africa.

    While our YEC friends dispute the scientific findings for the age of our species, I thought that I'd posts my own biogeographic background (haplogroup lineage and age). This is based on mitochondrial DNA and I am female, so some limitations there.

    Branch L3 (common matrilineal ancestor to all women today)—Age about 67,000 years ago. Origin, East Africa
    Branch N (one of 2 haplogroups descended from L3)—Age about 60,000 years ago. Origin, East Africa or Asia
    NOTE: Branch N went north and west; the other branch went east.
    Branch R—Age about 55,000 years ago. Origin, West Asia (also referred to as Near East)
    Branch R0—Age about 41,000 years ago. Origin, West Asia
    Branch HV—Age about 22,350 years ago +/- 7745 years. Origin, West Asia
    Branch H—Age about 28,000 years ago. Origin, West Asia
    NOTE The H branch moved west & north into Northern Europe. Highest % of this line is in Ireland (61 percent).
    Branch H1—Age about 9900 years ago +/- 800 years. Origin, West Asia
    NOTE H1 is part of H group that moved west & north into Northern Europe; 9% to 12% of maternal lineages in British Isles.
     
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