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Regretting sex change

Ella S.

Dispassionate Goth
This came across on my news feed today:




The article explains how most trans people are happier after transitioning:

"Many have been harassed or verbally abused. They’ve been kicked out of their homes, denied health care and accosted in bathrooms. A quarter have been physically attacked, and about 1 in 5 have been fired or lost out on a promotion because of their gender identity. They are more than twice as likely as the population at large to have experienced serious mental health struggles such as depression.



Yet most trans adults say transitioning has made them more satisfied with their lives.
“Living doesn’t hurt anymore,” said TC Caldwell, a 37-year-old Black nonbinary person from Montgomery, Ala. “It feels good to just breathe and be myself.”

The statistics get a bit involved but it is rather clear that overall most are more satisfied afterwards. It is a complex issue. Not everyone is going to be happy. Some will even transition back.. There is no simple "You can and should transition or No, you should not and cannot transition" answer. The fact that some are going to have regrets does not justify ending this process for everybody. One does not make policy solely based upon minorities. Saying no one can transition because a handful truly regret it would be a gross miscarriage of justice.
Thank you.

There is a reason that transitioning is often recommended by medical professionals. More than just making people happier after transitioning, it also helps to alleviate mental health crises, including suicidal ideation.

Gender confirmation surgery is sometimes the best way of alleviating gender dysphoria and the ensuing mental health issues it causes, again, including suicidal ideation. It actually prevents people from killing themselves.

It is a life saving medical procedure.
 

metis

aged ecumenical anthropologist
Thank you.

There is a reason that transitioning is often recommended by medical professionals. More than just making people happier after transitioning, it also helps to alleviate mental health crises, including suicidal ideation.

Gender confirmation surgery is sometimes the best way of alleviating gender dysphoria and the ensuing mental health issues it causes, again, including suicidal ideation. It actually prevents people from killing themselves.

It is a life saving medical procedure.
Short and sweet. :)
 

Shadow Wolf

Certified People sTabber
This came across on my news feed today:




The article explains how most trans people are happier after transitioning:

"Many have been harassed or verbally abused. They’ve been kicked out of their homes, denied health care and accosted in bathrooms. A quarter have been physically attacked, and about 1 in 5 have been fired or lost out on a promotion because of their gender identity. They are more than twice as likely as the population at large to have experienced serious mental health struggles such as depression.



Yet most trans adults say transitioning has made them more satisfied with their lives.
“Living doesn’t hurt anymore,” said TC Caldwell, a 37-year-old Black nonbinary person from Montgomery, Ala. “It feels good to just breathe and be myself.”

The statistics get a bit involved but it is rather clear that overall most are more satisfied afterwards. It is a complex issue. Not everyone is going to be happy. Some will even transition back.. There is no simple "You can and should transition or No, you should not and cannot transition" answer. The fact that some are going to have regrets does not justify ending this process for everybody. One does not make policy solely based upon minorities. Saying no one can transition because a handful truly regret it would be a gross miscarriage of justice.
This came across on my news feed today:




The article explains how most trans people are happier after transitioning:

"Many have been harassed or verbally abused. They’ve been kicked out of their homes, denied health care and accosted in bathrooms. A quarter have been physically attacked, and about 1 in 5 have been fired or lost out on a promotion because of their gender identity. They are more than twice as likely as the population at large to have experienced serious mental health struggles such as depression.



Yet most trans adults say transitioning has made them more satisfied with their lives.
“Living doesn’t hurt anymore,” said TC Caldwell, a 37-year-old Black nonbinary person from Montgomery, Ala. “It feels good to just breathe and be myself.”

The statistics get a bit involved but it is rather clear that overall most are more satisfied afterwards. It is a complex issue. Not everyone is going to be happy. Some will even transition back.. There is no simple "You can and should transition or No, you should not and cannot transition" answer. The fact that some are going to have regrets does not justify ending this process for everybody. One does not make policy solely based upon minorities. Saying no one can transition because a handful truly regret it would be a gross miscarriage of justice.
Yeah, I can say just with hormones things started to improve and just a little fat redistribution on my face to make it look less male helped it so I could actually stand to look at myself in the mirror.
 

SomeRandom

Still learning to be wise
Staff member
Premium Member
Circumcision is useless, needless and it does inflict intense pain and suffering. It makes life start for many men, especially American, with a pathetically absurd and entirely useless and needless shot of cortisone to the brain.
And you're proving my point with the chemicals because of the lack of momentum and movements banning them despite the hazards.
What kind of suffering is inflicted specifically?
I only ask because I’ve heard conflicting accounts from both sides of the aisle, so to speak.
So I’m merely curious
 

Shadow Wolf

Certified People sTabber
What kind of suffering is inflicted specifically?
I only ask because I’ve heard conflicting accounts from both sides of the aisle, so to speak.
So I’m merely curious
A lot of pain, and a harsh and strong shot of cortisone to start crapping on brain development early.
Amd that's if things aren't botched.
 

SkepticThinker

Veteran Member
"... based on what appears to be your own personal opinion..." is 100% false. And I think you know it.

post#58 - link

In the above post, which you responded to, has direct quotes from the study that started this exchange. It states the most responders benefitted from the surgery. That is NOT my personal opinion. That is in the source brought. Also, I quoted the article showing that what we're talking about it "annoying" "frustrating" and "dissapointing". That is NOT my personal opinion. Then you kept dragging your feet, claiming, "oh, it's the same thing, it's regret, it's still regret". *shrugs* "You're making up your own defintion". Total garbage. The fact that I had dig up something sciency to get you to admit what I've been saying all along, speaks volumes. What have I been saying all along?

This isn't just any sort of regret. This isn't knee surgery regret. This is serious.

"Devastating" "Ruined life" and "Betrayl" is completely different than "Annoying" "Frustrating" and "Dissappointing".

Just pulling up a study where patients are dissappointed in their recovery time shows it is not at all comparable unless we're showing how extremely serious the choice to transition is, and how extremely important it is to get this right.
Sorry, what is it that you think I "admitted?"

What you seem to be telling me is that "regret" and "serious regret" are completely different things, because you added an adjective to the sentence.

People who have knee surgery can have regrets and they can have "serious" regrets. Knee surgery can ruin your life, or make your life more difficult, or less difficult, or more frustrating or less frustrating, etc., etc., etc. Similarly, people who transition can have regrets and they can have "serious" regrets. They're all still regrets.

  • The onset of new pain when performing their usual activities and movements created frustration. This kind of pain was described as continuing for several months after surgery, and was experienced as bothersome.
  • Discontentment with annoying and long-lasting stiffness
  • Cosmetic aspects were also mentioned as something annoying
  • The participants said that they worried something was wrong
  • They also expressed disappointment with their inability or difficulty in performing their favorite recreational activities
All of these are regrets. Some bigger or smaller than others, but regrets, nonetheless.
 

dybmh

דניאל יוסף בן מאיר הירש
Sorry, what is it that you think I "admitted?"

See below:

There are varying degrees of regret.

apparently you're just making up your own definition.

Please see attached.

"What Makes for the Most Intense
Regrets? Comparing the Effects of
Several Theoretical Predictors of
Regret Intensity"

Of course there can be different degrees of regret

I said, "There are varying degrees of regret", and it took multiple posts to get you to admit "there can be varying degrees of regret"

What you seem to be telling me is that "regret" and "serious regret" are completely different things, because you added an adjective to the sentence.

People who have knee surgery can have regrets and they can have "serious" regrets. Knee surgery can ruin your life, or make your life more difficult, or less difficult, or more frustrating or less frustrating, etc., etc., etc. Similarly, people who transition can have regrets and they can have "serious" regrets. They're all still regrets.

  • The onset of new pain when performing their usual activities and movements created frustration. This kind of pain was described as continuing for several months after surgery, and was experienced as bothersome.
  • Discontentment with annoying and long-lasting stiffness
  • Cosmetic aspects were also mentioned as something annoying
  • The participants said that they worried something was wrong
  • They also expressed disappointment with their inability or difficulty in performing their favorite recreational activities
All of these are regrets. Some bigger or smaller than others, but regrets, nonetheless.

We are not talking about frustration, or annoyance, or dissappointment.
 
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