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Featured Indian-origin scientist proposes new 'origin of life'

Discussion in 'Science and Religion' started by Aupmanyav, Aug 2, 2022.

  1. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Be your own guru

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    They got the cue from their earlier success when they used cyanide to drive other chemical reactions. The plan was to try cyanide, without enzyme, and see if it helps turn alpha-keto acids into amino acids.

    As they knew nitrogen would be required in some form, they added ammonia — a form of nitrogen that would have been present on early earth. Then, through trial and error, they discovered a third key ingredient: carbon dioxide. With this mixture, the team began to see formation of amino acids.

    Unlike previously proposed reactions, this one worked at room temperature and in a wide acid-base range.

    The study – published in Nature Chemistry last week - also helps bring together two sides of a long-standing debate about the importance of carbon dioxide to early life, concluding that carbon dioxide was key, but only in combination with other molecules.
    Indian-origin scientist proposes new 'origin of life'
     
    #1 Aupmanyav, Aug 2, 2022
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2022
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  2. danieldemol

    danieldemol Well-Known Member
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    Loved your OP, but what does it have to do with religion?

    Or is your point that it is opposed to religious ideas about origins of life?

    In my opinion.
     
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  3. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Be your own guru

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    :) I am a bit surprised by your post. Do not religions say that God created humans from soil or ribs?
    Now, it is clear that it was cyanide, ammonia and carbon-DI-oxide to begin with and must have been accomplished over a long long time.
    Tell me if it is not related to religion? :D
     
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  4. exchemist

    exchemist Veteran Member

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    I tried to find the article and think this may be it: Prebiotic synthesis of α-amino acids and orotate from α-ketoacids potentiates transition to extant metabolic pathways | Nature Chemistry

    I noticed that Krishnamurthy has published papers before that explore the possible role of cyanide in abiogenesis. There was one about glyoxalate and this also seems to be about α-keto acids.
     
    #4 exchemist, Aug 2, 2022
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2022
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  5. exchemist

    exchemist Veteran Member

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    It's not related to religion - or not to sensible versions of religions.
     
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  6. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Be your own guru

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    You are absolutely correct. :D
     
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  7. Audie

    Audie Veteran Member

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    How can you tell sensible ones from insensible
     
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  8. exchemist

    exchemist Veteran Member

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    Insensible means unconscious.
     
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  9. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Be your own guru

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    That is quite easy, Audie, IMHO. The sensible ones go with knowledge, insensible ones go with superstitions.
     
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  10. Jayhawker Soule

    Jayhawker Soule <yawn> ignore </yawn>
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    Thanks for the link. It led me to this article: Earth's Earliest Climate.

    Deep-Time Climate Change

    We currently inhabit an “icehouse” world. We use much of the available data and geologic evidence to understand near-term (<1 million years) climate fluctuations typical of icehouse periods and what this might mean for our future. While the “greenhouse” worlds of the Archean, Proterozoic, and much of the Phanerozoic may seem foreign in many ways, these times do reveal Earth’s full spectrum of known climate possibilities.​

    Perhaps what is most telling is that climate regulation has been a mainstay from the beginning. Despite large changes in solar energy as well as dramatic impact events, our climate has been perpetually suitable for some form of life. Inorganic processes have played a big part in this regulation, particularly through cycles of outgassing, weathering, albedo, and oceanic circulation associated with plate tectonics.

    From its origin, life has greatly impacted its climate-atmosphere system — without permanently tipping the balance toward uninhabitability. However we also see that when conditions reach a tipping point (e.g., The Great Oxidation Event), change can be extraordinarily rapid and (as yet) irreversible. As we continue to impact the ocean-atmosphere system, we must look to deep-time climate change — particularly these abrupt and seemingly permanent transitions — to more fully frame our forecasts and design our solutions.​

    And, more at my level: What Happened in the Archean Eon?

    I've often found myself wishing that I had pursued a study in geology only to sadly conclude that it was a bridge too far.
     
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  11. Jayhawker Soule

    Jayhawker Soule <yawn> ignore </yawn>
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    I generally agree, but I would add that "science or Genesis 2" is, in my opinion, a false choice.
     
  12. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Be your own guru

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    That was a bridge too far for me too, Physics or Geology. Mathematics undid me. :D
     
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  13. LuisDantas

    LuisDantas Aura of atheification
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    Those that take pride on stubbornly and arrogantly wanting to neglect, ignore and lie about the reality of facts are among the insensible.
     
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  14. Jayhawker Soule

    Jayhawker Soule <yawn> ignore </yawn>
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    Many years ago I attended a course on special relativity taught by a young geophysicist. I seem to recall that it had a lot to do with hyperbolic functions, but that's the only thing I recall except for the fact that the teacher (who was also a Quaker) impressed the hell out of me. I've had recurrent geology-envy ever since.
     
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  15. Polymath257

    Polymath257 Think & Care
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    It is possible to use hyperbolic trig functions in special relativity, but not required. The advantage is that many of the formulas have analogs to simple rotations in Euclidean geometry.
     
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  16. Polymath257

    Polymath257 Think & Care
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    Me too. :) :)
     
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  17. Audie

    Audie Veteran Member

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  18. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Be your own guru

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    Forgot to mention that I was 18 at that time. :D
    (Why blame Mathematics only)
    But Polymath, you are a Mathetician!?
     
    #18 Aupmanyav, Aug 2, 2022
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2022
  19. Audie

    Audie Veteran Member

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    So how do you derermine what version
    of a religion is sensible?
     
  20. Audie

    Audie Veteran Member

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    What religion or version thereof is based
    on knowledge?
     
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