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Hormone and laws are arabic words On religious occasions

Discussion in 'Religious Debates' started by j1i, Oct 17, 2019.

  1. j1i

    j1i Smiling is charity without giving money

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    The word laws is an arabic word that originally means almond and is an Arabic word
    mountain of almonds
    This mountain is characterized by the presence of almond trees
    Jabal al-Lawz - Wikipedia
    The mountain where Moses received divine laws


    Hormone mountain means Sacred mountain
    حرم
    haram

    Hormone is a word attributed to the prohibition (ie, there are things that may not be done in this place) because of its specificity
    Hermon any haram thing
    Mount Hermon - Wikipedia

    I want to know similar phrases between Arabic, English and Hebrew in religious semantics
     
  2. dianaiad

    dianaiad Well-Known Member

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    In English the word 'law' is of old Germanic origin, through Old english. If it is similar to Arabic, that is only by coincidence. English and Arabic don't even have the same language tree, English being an Indo-European language, and Arabic being Afro-Asiatic. Arabic and Hebrew can and do have cognates; they are in the same language family.

    English and Arabic don't share a language 'tree' until all the way back to 'Nostratic.." one of three VERY early human languages.

    So....don't attempt to trace English words like "law," which originates in Old English and Old German, or 'hormone," which is from the Greek 'hormon,' meaning 'set in action.'

    If you have found cognates, wonderful....but that doesn't mean that the words are connected. They aren't. Why you would want to relate any Arabic word to English is beyond me. ;) Mind you, English has no problem robbing words from other languages; English is very much a 'bastardized tongue.' We'll steal from anybody.

    But we didn't steal those words from Arabic. I promise.

    (edited to put the emphasis on the proper word....I think there may have been some confusion about it. We've stolen a lot of words from every language we know about, including Arabic--but not those. ;) ).
     
    #2 dianaiad, Oct 17, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2019
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  3. Lyndon

    Lyndon "Peace is the answer" quote: GOD, 2014
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    Oh brother!!
     
  4. Lyndon

    Lyndon "Peace is the answer" quote: GOD, 2014
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    for the unaware out there, our numbers come directly from Arabic
     
  5. dybmh

    dybmh Terminal Optimist
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    HA! Good one.

    Achi = brother... both in Hebrew and Arabic.
     
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  6. exchemist

    exchemist Well-Known Member

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    I agree with @dianaiad that neither hormone nor law is of Arabic origin. But we do have quite a number of words from Arabic There is a list of them here: List of English words of Arabic origin (A-B) - Wikipedia
     
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  7. dianaiad

    dianaiad Well-Known Member

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    Yes they do. and thank the Arabs very much.....but they come from Arabic, not because the words/descriptions came from the Arabic family tree, but because the CONCEPT did. The numbers, and "0" for that matter. WE were stuck with 'roman numerals' up to that point. And no place holder zero, either.

    Without them we would be toast, as any sort of modern civilization. However, that's not 'language,' that's math. They had to teach us the entire concept so that we, as a global civilization, could plug it in.

    But Arabic numerals don't have anything to do with language trees, Lyndon. Indo-European is one tree...and you will find neither Arabic nor Hebrew in it. Afro-Asiatic is the one where you find Arabic and other semitic languages. (shrug) Indo-European branches out itself...West Germanic (that's us...) the "Romance" languages that came from Latin and include Spanish, Portuguese, French, etc, . Baltic-Slavic, which gave birthto Russian, Croatian, Ukrainian and the languages related to them, and "indo-Iranian" (which is actually just Indo European without the fancy branching) which ended up as Hindi, Bengali, etc.

    Of all the languages from all the 'trees,' English is the most opportunistic. Unlike many, if not most, other languages, there is no council that attempts to keep the 'purity' of the language. The French have one, and so do the Spanish. Germans do, too....I THINK. I could be wrong about that.

    But the English don't.

    English grabs vocabulary whenever it can find it, to use for whatever is needed. If there is a concept we need to find a word for, and we don't have it but someone else does, we'll grab it. We've been doing that since the Normans invaded the British Isles. And English speakers have been trying to pretend that English is something it's not for centuries. Shoot, it's only been within the last fifty or sixty years that the academics have admitted that we have a Germanic grammar, not a Latin one. think about it, for those of you who are old enough...HOW many times were you told as a kid that you couldn't split an infinitive?

    That's because languages with Latin roots CAN'T. the French can't. The Spanish can't...but we do it all the time. You know, "to boldly go' where no-one has gone before?
    But our VOCABULARY is huge...because we steal it from everybody. So yeah, we have Arabic words....NOW. WE have Spanish ones and French ones (a LOT of French ones, actually) and Mandarin ones and Tagalog ones--but they are all 'modern.' That is, our 'corral' is just like the current Spanish corral. We don't have a different word that can be traced back to "corral.'

    This isn't about which language is 'better.' It's just....the way it is. There are many languages that have 'better' or more accurate terms for something than English does. When we see one of those, we'll swipe it and adopt it as our own.

    And this is, I think, one of the reasons that English is the most often spoken and taught 'second language' in the world. It steals, unabashedly and gleefully, all the best stuff from everybody else.
     
    #7 dianaiad, Oct 17, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2019
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  8. j1i

    j1i Smiling is charity without giving money

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    thanks dude for this comment
    One word has been preserved throughout history to confirm divinely that Jews and Arabs must be his brother

    and really you my achi
    GOD bless you ;)
     
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  9. j1i

    j1i Smiling is charity without giving money

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    thanks for all to replay
    German language returned to Turkish language
    The Turkish language also descends from Middle Eastern civilizations

    It is true that the geographical difference is far
    I do not try to convince you that the word is Arabic
    But for watching this video thank you very much

    Thank you for putting the link and the noble dialogue
     
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  10. dybmh

    dybmh Terminal Optimist
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    Right back at ya, Achi!
     
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  11. Howard Is

    Howard Is Lucky Mud

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    All musicians use an Arabic word - at least I think it’s Arabic, it may be Turkish, because I heard it in relation to the life of Rumi.

    Jam. It means a spiritual conversation, such as the conversation between Rumi and Shams.

    The word came into the western musical lexicon via black Muslim jazz musicians.
     
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  12. dianaiad

    dianaiad Well-Known Member

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    Seriously?

    All my research says that it's use originated from when several 'bands' or musical groups would get together informally to play...improvisationally, usually, after a gig. It was called "jam" or "jamming' because it was a sort of 'smashing together' of musicians, the way fruit is 'smashed together' for the fruit preserves called 'jam." THAT 'jam' was an English word coined in the 18th century to refer to the boiling down and smashing together of fruit and sugar to preserve it, as opposed to 'jelly.'

    As a musical term, it may have originated among black musicians, but wasn't exclusive to them, even in the beginning. Better to say that it originated among jazz and 'big band' musicians...a HUGE percentage of which were black.

    but not, as a rule, Muslim.

    Unless of course you are A: pulling our chains with this, or B can show us the etymology of it with a source I couldn't find anywhere?
     
  13. Howard Is

    Howard Is Lucky Mud

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    I read that in a book about Rumi many years ago.
     
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  14. dianaiad

    dianaiad Well-Known Member

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    Well, darn.

    I need a little more than that. ;)

    I have looked at the Urban Dictionary, the Oxford dictionary, a couple of encyclopedias and a history of 'black music in America,' and they all point to 'jam' coming from the preserves thing, not from black Muslim musicians (of which there were rather few...most American black musicians at the time were either non-religious or Protestant Christian, with Catholics coming in there somewhere)

    I'm sorry. Words are my hot button. Where they come from, what they mean, who uses them.....

    The fact that English DOES steal all its vocabulary from elsewhere tickles me.


    So if you could find that book, or another source for your claim, I would be really interested....and yes, tickled, to find another source for 'jam' (music).
     
  15. Howard Is

    Howard Is Lucky Mud

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    That’s your problem.

    I stand by what I have said. That is what I read in a book about Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Rūmī, and his relationship with Shams-i -Tabrizi.

    Your tone is very disrespectful and combative.

    Chill.
     
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  16. dianaiad

    dianaiad Well-Known Member

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    I went out of my way to NOT be disrespectful. I truly would be tickled to find another view of where 'jam' the musical term came from.

    But I can't use some guy I don't know on the internet who said that he read it in some book somewhere....and expects me to take his word that this is where the word came from.

    I'm quite sure that YOU believe that this is where the word came from.

    Because you read it in a book, some time ago...a book the title of which you can't remember.

    But I need more than that if I'm going to put your word for it up against all those sources I CAN find and name, including sources specific to music and, specifically, black musicians. If you want to call that being disrespectful, I'm sorry about that.
     
  17. Jayhawker Soule

    Jayhawker Soule <yawn> ignore </yawn>
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    And salaam [salam] comes from the word salami which, given the Hebrew suffix, means "my peace", clearly presaging John 14:27.
     
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  18. j1i

    j1i Smiling is charity without giving money

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    THANKS ALL brothers for sharing
    this is really kind of you
    hugg
    :hugehug:

    god bless you
     
  19. 9-10ths_Penguin

    9-10ths_Penguin 1/10 Riboflavin
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    IIRC, the word "law" came into Old English via the Vikings relatively late. Before that, Old English generally used the original term "dōm."
     
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