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Health Matters: 50+

Alien826

No religious beliefs
Pressure testing seems part of the standard routine whenever you go for an eye test in the UK. So if you need glasses you always get it done every couple of years or so. But if you don’t wear specs I’m not sure how it would be picked up.

Same here. The optician I saw did test the pressures, but obviously got it very wrong. She also looked into my eyes with some new fangled device that she was very proud of. I think that if you don't need glasses or the ones you have are still OK then you should have them checked anyway.

Incidentally, I just had my pressures checked, first by my ophthalmologist, then by an optician. The ophthalmologist got 15 in each eye using a test where the eye is actually touched by the instrument and the optician got 12 in each eye using the puff of air test. The pressures may vary based on how recently I used my eye drops, so both could be accurate but I tend to trust the first result more.
 

Secret Chief

nirvana is samsara
Same here. The optician I saw did test the pressures, but obviously got it very wrong. She also looked into my eyes with some new fangled device that she was very proud of. I think that if you don't need glasses or the ones you have are still OK then you should have them checked anyway.

Incidentally, I just had my pressures checked, first by my ophthalmologist, then by an optician. The ophthalmologist got 15 in each eye using a test where the eye is actually touched by the instrument and the optician got 12 in each eye using the puff of air test. The pressures may vary based on how recently I used my eye drops, so both could be accurate but I tend to trust the first result more.
I think the opthamologist test is the more accurate; the puff of air reading is susceptible to variation caused by the thickness of your corneas.
 

Mock Turtle

Oh my, did I say that!
Premium Member
A first for me (in my late 70s), and still not sure as to the cause. Doing some gardening - mainly using a strimmer and a hedge cutter (not at the same time :oops:) - on a rather hot day and perhaps where I was overdressed, I felt some dizziness coming on and would have fainted it seems if I had not gone inside and sat down and taken appropriate action. I usually know when to rest so this caught me out. Perhaps I was overheated, or given that I don't eat a lot these days - not doing much to require this - perhaps I am weaker than I think. Or perhaps I have a bug about to bite me - have missed Covid apparently. Felt OK after a little while but it would be nice to know why it occurred. I usually have no problems walking to the shops and such but I don't do anything that could be called exercise. :oops:
 

Secret Chief

nirvana is samsara
A first for me (in my late 70s), and still not sure as to the cause. Doing some gardening - mainly using a strimmer and a hedge cutter (not at the same time :oops:) - on a rather hot day and perhaps where I was overdressed, I felt some dizziness coming on and would have fainted it seems if I had not gone inside and sat down and taken appropriate action. I usually know when to rest so this caught me out. Perhaps I was overheated, or given that I don't eat a lot these days - not doing much to require this - perhaps I am weaker than I think. Or perhaps I have a bug about to bite me - have missed Covid apparently. Felt OK after a little while but it would be nice to know why it occurred. I usually have no problems walking to the shops and such but I don't do anything that could be called exercise. :oops:
Well, it was very hot today... were you bending down and then standing up a bit? The old blood flow to the brain may have been a bit sluggish? Maybe see the GP? (If you can actually get to see one).
 
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Mock Turtle

Oh my, did I say that!
Premium Member
Well, it was very hot today... were you bending down and then standing up a bit? The old blood flow to the brain may have been a bit sluggish? Maybe see the GP? (If you can actually get to see one).
I've never had any such issues with dizziness before, so perhaps it is a warning to get more exercise and look after my body - fat chance. :eek:
 

exchemist

Veteran Member
A first for me (in my late 70s), and still not sure as to the cause. Doing some gardening - mainly using a strimmer and a hedge cutter (not at the same time :oops:) - on a rather hot day and perhaps where I was overdressed, I felt some dizziness coming on and would have fainted it seems if I had not gone inside and sat down and taken appropriate action. I usually know when to rest so this caught me out. Perhaps I was overheated, or given that I don't eat a lot these days - not doing much to require this - perhaps I am weaker than I think. Or perhaps I have a bug about to bite me - have missed Covid apparently. Felt OK after a little while but it would be nice to know why it occurred. I usually have no problems walking to the shops and such but I don't do anything that could be called exercise. :oops:
Low blood pressure, esp. if dehydrated, perhaps? I've got a cheapo Boots blood pressure thingie that my late wife used. I've been taking it occasionally, after my heart "procedure", just to check. Mine isn't high, but then if it gets a bit low when one is old I imagine it could cause dizziness. Even standing up too quickly can do it.
 

Mock Turtle

Oh my, did I say that!
Premium Member
Low blood pressure, esp. if dehydrated, perhaps? I've got a cheapo Boots blood pressure thingie that my late wife used. I've been taking it occasionally, after my heart "procedure", just to check. Mine isn't high, but then if it gets a bit low when one is old I imagine it could cause dizziness. Even standing up too quickly can do it.
Too high if anything, given I'm on some medication to lower blood pressure. I have a monitor but haven't used it in some time, but recent checks (after I cut myself) at hospital and after a routine blood check later seemed to have been normal. I have noticed myself getting physically weaker and this should be expected given the lack of exercise I get, so perhaps old age is beginning to strike.
 

exchemist

Veteran Member
Too high if anything, given I'm on some medication to lower blood pressure. I have a monitor but haven't used it in some time, but recent checks (after I cut myself) at hospital and after a routine blood check later seemed to have been normal. I have noticed myself getting physically weaker and this should be expected given the lack of exercise I get, so perhaps old age is beginning to strike.
Hmm. There is another thing, to do with balance. Your semicircular canals can get a bit furred up or something and if you tilt your head up you can get dizzy. I think it's called top shelf vertigo - but nothing to do with girlie mags, though those too could bring on dizziness I suppose. My brother had this for a bit. I sometimes get it a bit in the shower, when I tilt my head up to rinse off the shaving soap under my chin. "Benign positional vertigo"?.
 

Secret Chief

nirvana is samsara
I've never had any such issues with dizziness before, so perhaps it is a warning to get more exercise and look after my body - fat chance. :eek:

Too high if anything, given I'm on some medication to lower blood pressure. I have a monitor but haven't used it in some time, but recent checks (after I cut myself) at hospital and after a routine blood check later seemed to have been normal. I have noticed myself getting physically weaker and this should be expected given the lack of exercise I get, so perhaps old age is beginning to strike.
Want updates on my new pilates classes?!
 

RestlessSoul

Well-Known Member
I've never had any such issues with dizziness before, so perhaps it is a warning to get more exercise and look after my body - fat chance. :eek:


You've done well to get to your late 70s with no loss of mobility. I'm 62 and have always been quite active, but I'm really starting to slow down now. Going up stairs is quite an effort, which is a pain as I live on the 5th floor and the lift doesn't always work. Thirty years of heavy smoking didn't help, of course.
 

Mock Turtle

Oh my, did I say that!
Premium Member
You've done well to get to your late 70s with no loss of mobility. I'm 62 and have always been quite active, but I'm really starting to slow down now. Going up stairs is quite an effort, which is a pain as I live on the 5th floor and the lift doesn't always work. Thirty years of heavy smoking didn't help, of course.
One of the best decisions I ever made was not to smoke, and I doubt I would have been able to do all the outdoor activities I did if I had. I suppose my earlier activities have aided my health, and which has been commented upon by others, but the changes I have noticed over the last year or so have come as a wake-up call as to actually doing something if I'm not to fall victim to something fairly soon. I suspect I will have to just do more walking initially and possibly some weight-training to recover some strength, otherwise I will find the same things occurring as to gardening and such. I live in a semi-detached so no stairs to climb, hence no useful exercise within the home. And even though I still have a bike I don't deem the roads that safe these days. I gave away an indoor machine because I just wasn't using it.
 

Secret Chief

nirvana is samsara
I did have a look and this is probably something worth doing, if I can find the floor space, but will have to do something else as to getting some fitness back I think.
Pilates classes seem to be quite common where I live, tried looking online for your locality?

As well, or instead, there's good old youtube videos.
 

SalixIncendium

अग्निविलोवनन्दः
Staff member
Premium Member
I'm going to have to break down and see a chiropractor or something. My arm numbness has gotten to the point where the only time they don't go numb/tingle is if I'm standing or sitting with my arms relaxed in the upright position. Even as I raise my arms to the keyboard to type this, my arms are tingling.

I can live with the waking up at night and adjusting my posture, but as this progresses, I have concerns about the use of my arms and hands.
 

Secret Chief

nirvana is samsara
I'm going to have to break down and see a chiropractor or something. My arm numbness has gotten to the point where the only time they don't go numb/tingle is if I'm standing or sitting with my arms relaxed in the upright position. Even as I raise my arms to the keyboard to type this, my arms are tingling.

I can live with the waking up at night and adjusting my posture, but as this progresses, I have concerns about the use of my arms and hands.
Have you seen a doctor in the first instance?
 

SalixIncendium

अग्निविलोवनन्दः
Staff member
Premium Member
Have you seen a doctor in the first instance?
Yes. MRIs...x-rays. We know the problem but haven't offered a solution. Apparently there are small holes in the vertebrae the nerves travel through and mine have become constricted. I had a doctor review imaging with me, but he had not advice on a resolution. I guess it's just something I'm supposed to live with...
 
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