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The Golden Rule

Discussion in 'Interfaith Discussion' started by Stained_Class, Mar 19, 2004.

  1. Stained_Class

    Stained_Class Member

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    HINDUISM

    This is the sum of duty: do not do to others what
    would cause pain if done to you

    (Mahabharata 5:1517)


    BUDDHISM

    Treat not others in ways that you yourself woud find
    hurtful

    (Udana-Varga 5.18)


    CONFUCIANISM

    One word which sums up the basis of all good conduct
    ... "loving-kindness"
    Do not do to others what you do not want done to
    yourself

    (Confucius, Analects 15.23)


    TAOISM

    Regard your neighbor's gain as your own gain, and your
    neighbor's loss as your own loss

    (T'ai Shang Kan Ying P'ien 213-218)


    SIKHISM

    I am a stranger to no one; and no one is a stranger to
    me. Indeed, I am a friend to all

    (Guru Granth Sahib, page 1299)


    CHRISTIANITY

    In everything, do to others as you would have them do
    to you, for this is the law and the Prophets

    (Jesus, Matthew 7:12)


    UNITARIANISM

    We affirm and promote respect for the interdependent
    web of all existence of which we are part

    (Unitarian Principle)


    NATIVE SPIRITUALITY

    All things are our relatives; what we do to
    everything, we do to ourselves. All is really One

    (Black Elk, Oglala Sioux)


    ZOROASTRIANISM

    Do not do unto others whatever is injurous to yourself

    (Shayast-na-Shayast 13.29)


    JAINISM

    One should treat all creatures in the world as one
    would like to be treated

    (Mahavira, Sutrakritanga)


    JUDAISM

    What is hateful to you, do not do to your neighbor.
    This is the whole Torah; all the rest is commentary

    (Hillel, Talmud, Shabbat 31a)


    ISLAM

    Not one of you truly believes until you wish for
    others what you wish for yourself

    (The Prophet Muhammad, Hadith)


    BAHA 'I FAITH

    Lay not on any soul a load that you would not wish to
    be laid upon you, and desire not for anyone the things
    you would not desire for yourself

    (Baha'u'llah, Gleanings)
     
  2. Runt

    Runt Well-Known Member

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    Wicca: "Live you must and let to live" and "And it harm none, do what you will."
     
  3. Stained_Class

    Stained_Class Member

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    Oh yeah ... forgot aboot that one.

    What is the reference just so I have it at all times?


    Thank ye much
     
  4. Runt

    Runt Well-Known Member

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    They both come from the Wiccan Rede.

    WICCAN REDE

    Bide ye wiccan laws you must,
    in perfect love and perfect trust

    Live ye must and let to live,
    fairly take and fairly give
    For the circle thrice about
    to keep unwelcome spirits out

    To bind ye spell well every time,
    let the spell be spake in rhyme
    Soft of eye and light of touch,
    speak ye little, listen much

    Deosil go by the waxing moon,
    Chanting out ye baleful tune
    When ye Lady's moon is new,
    kiss ye hand to her times two

    When ye moon rides at her peak,
    Then ye heart's desire seek
    Heed the north winds mighty gale,
    lock the door and trim the sail

    When the wind comes from the south,
    love will kiss thee on the mouth
    When the wind blows from the east,
    expect the new and set the feast.

    Nine woods in the cauldron go,
    burn them fast and burn them slow
    Elder be ye Lady's tree,
    burn it not or cursed ye'll be

    When the wheel begins to turn,
    soon ye beltane fires will burn
    When the whell hath turned a Yule
    light the log the Horned One rules

    Heed ye flower, bush and tree,
    by the Lady blessed be
    Where the rippling waters go,
    cast a stone, the thruth ye'll know

    When ye have and hold a need,
    harken not to others greed
    With a fool no season spend,
    or be counted as his friend

    Merry meet and merry part,
    bright the cheeks and warm the heart.
    Mind ye threefold law ye should,
    three times bad and three times good

    When misfortune is enow,
    wear the star upon they brow
    True in love must ye ever be,
    lest thy love be false to thee

    These eight words the wiccan rede fulfill;
    An harm ye none, do what ye will.
     
  5. RavenRose

    RavenRose Member

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    As I understand it there are many, many diffrent variations of the Rede.

    As for the Golden Rule...
    do you think religions use it to just sound nice, but then with their other rules they become exclusive? (The way to save your soul is their only one true way)
     
  6. Runt

    Runt Well-Known Member

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    Aye, there are many different versions of the Rede, but this is the first version and was written by Lady Gwen Thompson in the 1970s.
     
  7. Green Gaia

    Green Gaia Veteran Member

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    Wonderful list! Just proves that different religions can have more in common than differences if that is what they wish to focus on.
     
  8. anders

    anders Well-Known Member

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    Well, I find a difference beween the positive and the negative wording. To me, the Christian (positive) one is too Uebermensch: "I know what is best for me, and therefore, it must be optimal for everybody else, so I do to them what I want them to do to me".

    Extreme interpretation: "Being a masochist, I want people to harm me. So, according to the Christian Golden Rule, I must get out and harm people." You are more on the safe side with the negative version, as it tells you what NOT to do.

    The Taoism (I prefer Daoism) version quoted is more about compassion than about what people should or should not do. The ancient Daoism rather taught that you should do nothing that goes against Dao (the Way; nature's ways), misinterpreted as "do nothing" (wu wei).

    Anders
     
  9. dudley thoth

    dudley thoth Member

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    "Terrify not men or God will terrify thee" (Ancient Egyptian. Precepts of Ptahhetep.)

    "Slander not" (Babylonian. 'Hymn to Samas')

    "He whose heart is in the smallest degree set upon goodness will dislike no one" (Ancient Chinese. 'Analects, 4.4)

    "This first I rede thee: be blameless to thy kindred. Take no vengence even though they do thee wrong" (Old Norse. 'sigrdrifumal', 22)

    From ' The Abolition of Man' C.S Lewis
     
  10. Master Vigil

    Master Vigil Well-Known Member

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    "The Taoism (I prefer Daoism) version quoted is more about compassion than about what people should or should not do. The ancient Daoism rather taught that you should do nothing that goes against Dao (the Way; nature's ways), misinterpreted as "do nothing" (wu wei)."

    It still shows that one "should or should not do" what goes against the Tao. Wu wei shows that this is understood as doing nothing more than necessary. Only wanted what is within and not without. When you know yourself, you know what is best for the universe.
     
  11. jonjohnrob11

    jonjohnrob11 Member

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    seek not pleasure and u will be satisfied, when u receive it. butch
     
  12. painted wolf

    painted wolf Grey Muzzle

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    Trouble no one about thier religion; respect others in thier view and demand that they respect yours. -Tecumseh

    Treat the earth well: it was not given to you by your parents, it was loaned to you by your children. We do not inherit the Earth from our Ancestors, we borrow it from our Children. -old native proverb

    All things share the same breath - the beast, the tree, the man, the air shares its spirit with all the life it supports. -Chief Seattle

    wa:-do
     
  13. anders

    anders Well-Known Member

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    "Yet there be no compulsion in religion"

    Which holy book?

    The Holy Qur'an, 2:256. There are more verses stating the same kind of tolerance. It is not difficult to find similar quotes regarding tolerance in religions like Buddhism, Jainism, SikhĂ­sm, Daoism... I find it more difficult to interpret Bible verses to make them sound tolerant.
     
  14. Jayhawker Soule

    Jayhawker Soule <yawn> ignore </yawn>
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    Good morning, Maize.

    It seems to me that religion, as a cultural phenomenon, has always endeavored to answer the big "why" questions while cohering society around a moral and ethical consensus. It seems hardly remarkable to me that much of this consensus transcends religious dogma. And, given the reference to Confucius, this core value need not be limited to religions.

    As for the quotes, and while I actually prefer the Hillel reference (based on Tobit 4:15), I was surprised that Leviticus 19:18 failed to make the list. It is, after all, the 'original' when it comes to Judeo-Christian tradition.

    I heard an interesting comment regarding the translation of Leviticus...

    Normally rendered:
    • love thy neighbour as thyself
    it can also be read:
    • love thy neighbour - he is like you
    This seems to me the more profound interpretation.

    Take care.
     
  15. Jayhawker Soule

    Jayhawker Soule <yawn> ignore </yawn>
    Premium Member

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    Good morning, Maize.

    It seems to me that religion, as a cultural phenomenon, has always endeavored to answer the big "why" questions while cohering society around a moral and ethical consensus. It seems hardly remarkable to me that much of this consensus transcends religious dogma. And, given the reference to Confucius, this core value need not be limited to religions.

    As for the quotes, and while I actually prefer the Hillel reference (based on Tobit 4:15), I was surprised that Leviticus 19:18 failed to make the list. It is, after all, the 'original' when it comes to Judeo-Christian tradition.

    I heard an interesting comment regarding the translation of Leviticus...

    Normally rendered:
    • love thy neighbour as thyself
    it can also be read:
    • love thy neighbour - he is like you
    This seems to me the more profound interpretation.

    Take care.
     
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