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Orthodox theology rejects Augustine's doctrine of Original Sin

Discussion in 'Orthodox Christian DIR' started by SageTree, Dec 22, 2012.

  1. SageTree

    SageTree Spiritual Friend
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    "Orthodox theology rejects Augustine's doctrine of Original Sin" -wiki

    Can folks speak more about what sin is specifically.

    I can't say I was ever draw in understanding by Original Sin,
    so seeing this peaks my curiosity.

    Also... is anyone versed enough in Muslim understanding to comment on if this relates to their concept of sin?

    Thank you.
     
  2. Shiranui117

    Shiranui117 Pronounced Shee-ra-noo-ee
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    "Sin" in Orthodox Christianity comes from Greek "hamartia," or, literally, "missing the mark." When we sin, we fail to live up to the calling that God has for us; that is, we fail to "be perfect as [our] Heavenly Father is perfect." When we sin, we distort and stain the image of God within us, and thus we are gradually corrupted away from being proper icons of the Trinity to being fallen and lost creatures in need of redemption and reconciliation with God. Sin introduces a rift between God and man, distancing us from God, Who is the Source of everlasting life.

    And TBH, I don't know enough about Islam to comment on their view of sin. It seems in some cases to be closer to Orthodoxy in that some sins are described as straying from God, and in some cases to be closer to Protestantism and Judaism in that some sins are described as being legal violations of religious law.
     
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  3. SageTree

    SageTree Spiritual Friend
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    That is a very reasonable and sound way to define sin. That was the impression I had of it, so thank you for clearing it up further.

    You are also probably right to say it's straying from and legalistic at the same time in Islam. That might be another thread coming :)

    Thank you.
     
  4. justfoolingaround

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    Hello, SageTree.
    In Orthodoxy, along with approving sin creates a rift between God and man, it is also true that we only have consequences of the fall and NOT guilty of Adam's own sin.
    As an ex-Muslim, I can say that in Islam you should have more Sawab than you sins. It means that you got to do more good deeds than bad deeds. You should be a kind person and stick to 6 requirements of Islam(believing in one God, in angels, in Holy Books, in afterlife and in destiny and in prophets.)
    Briefly, sin is bad deed. Sawab is good deed. You have to have more good deeds than bad deeds to enter heaven.
     
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  5. atpollard

    atpollard Active Member

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    I am not 100% sure I understand your question about Islam, but if you are asking if Islam includes the concept of original sin, then the answer is definitely "No."

    In Islam, everyone is born pure and sins on their own.
     
  6. SageTree

    SageTree Spiritual Friend
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    I had to go back and read this post as it's been a long long time since I posted. Since that time, I have been blessed with further reading, understanding, and experiences with the Orthodox Way of Livity, and have since found an overstanding to this question. I appreciate your answer, very much, as well as your examples from Islam, which would not be truthful to not say, has influenced me during the course of my life.

    I think you explained yourself well in the first reply. Thank you, and how fortunate to meet someone who could tackle both questions.

    Salaam alaikum and many blessings.
    Sage Tree
     
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