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Is Coronavirus from the devil?

Cooky

Veteran Member
Please explain All viruses reproduce.

This Virus does not generate new cells. It attaches itself to existing cells and takes them over, by reprogramming them to be like the virus... This is not reproduction.

...Like a zombie who bites a person, that person becomes a zombie, that too, if real, would not be considered reproduction.
 

shunyadragon

shunyadragon
Premium Member
This Virus does not generate new cells. It attaches itself to existing cells and takes them over, by reprogramming them to be like the virus... This is not reproduction.

That is a form of reproduction or as some call replication. They
Infecting and reproducing are not the same.

just do not reproduce like higher life forms.

https://www.amjmed.com/article/0002-9343(65)90190-7/pdf

Biochemistry of virus reproduction
DOI:Redirecting

PlumX Metrics
Viruses

virus
Viruses are microscopic biological agents that invade living hosts and infect their bodies by reproducing within their cell tissue.

PHOTOGRAPH BY MARYNA OLYAK

2adb092b-1726-4e56-a0dd-30056756ddae.jpg

Viruses are tiny infectious agents that rely on living cells to multiply. They may use an animal, plant, or bacteria host to survive and reproduce. As such, there is some debate as to whether or not viruses should be considered living organisms. A virus that is outside of a host cell is known as a virion.

Not only are viruses microscopic, they are smaller than many other microbes, such as bacteria. Most viruses are only 20–400 nanometers in diameter, whereas human egg cells, for example, are about 120 micrometers in diameter, and the E. coli bacteria has a diameter of around 1 micrometer. Viruses are so small that they are best viewed using an electron microscope, which is how they were first visualized in the 1940s.

Viruses generally come in two forms: rods or spheres. However, bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) have a unique shape, with a geometric head and filamentous tail fibers. No matter the shape, all viruses consist of genetic material (DNA or RNA) and have an outer protein shell, known as a capsid.

There are two processes used by viruses to replicate: the lytic cycle and lysogenic cycle. Some viruses reproduce using both methods, while others only use the lytic cycle. In the lytic cycle, the virus attaches to the host cell and injects its DNA. Using the host’s cellular metabolism, the viral DNA begins to replicate and form proteins. Then fully formed viruses assemble. These viruses break, or lyse, the cell and spread to other cells to continue the cycle.

Like the lytic cycle, in the lysogenic cycle the virus attaches to the host cell and injects its DNA. From there, the viral DNA gets incorporated into the host’s DNA and the host’s cells. Each time the host’s cells go through replication, the virus’s DNA gets replicated as well, spreading its genetic information throughout the host without having to lyse the infected cells.

In humans, viruses can cause many diseases. For example, the flu is caused by the influenza virus. Typically, viruses cause an immune response in the host, and this kills the virus. However, some viruses are not successfully treated by the immune system, such as human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV. This leads to a more chronic infection that is difficult or impossible to cure; often only the symptoms can be treated.

Unlike bacterial infections, antibiotics are ineffective at treating viral infections. Viral infections are best prevented by vaccines, though antiviral drugs can treat some viral infections. Most antiviral drugs work by interfering with viral replication. Some of these drugs stop DNA synthesis, preventing the virus from replicating

Although viruses can have devastating health consequences, they also have important technological applications. Viruses are particularly vital to gene therapy. Because some viruses incorporate their DNA into host DNA, they can be genetically modified to carry genes that would benefit the host. Some viruses can even be engineered to reproduce in cancer cells and trigger the immune system to kill those harmful cells. Although this is still an emerging field of research, it gives viruses the potential to one day do more good than harm.



2adb092b-1726-4e56-a0dd-30056756ddae_c111-0-1888-1333_r160x120.jpg

Viruses are microscopic biological agents that invade living hosts and infect their bodies by reproducing within their cell tissue.

Photograph by Maryna Olyak


.

...Like a zombie who bites a person, that person becomes a zombie, that too, if real, would not be considered reproduction.

Zombies do not exist.
 

Cooky

Veteran Member
That is a form of reproduction or as some call replication. They just do not reproduce like higher life forms.

It's not the same thing. Reproduction requires producing something... The coronavirus does not produce, but rather, affects other cells.

Granted, in the end the results are bbn oth increased numbers, but the method of achieving that end is most certainly not the same.
 

shunyadragon

shunyadragon
Premium Member
It's not the same thing. Reproduction requires producing something... The coronavirus does not produce, but rather, affects other cells.

Granted, in the end the results are bbn oth increased numbers, but the method of achieving that end is most certainly not the same.

My citations stand as quoted from scientific references. Viruses reproduce as described. The method is just different.
 

Cooky

Veteran Member
Of course not, but viruses reproduce by infection as cited. This really is not the issue, and Zombies do not exist.

The issue is the foolish superstitions question.
Is Coronavirus from the devil?

No they don't. They replicate by affection. They infect the host, and affect at the cellular level. To be exact.
 

Evangelicalhumanist

"Truth" isn't a thing...
Premium Member
No, it does not reproduce. That is a scientifically untrue statement.
A virus hijacks the machinery of another cell to make copies of itself. Like it or not, that's reproduction.

It does this by getting it's own DNA or RNA into the host cell, and having that host cell replicate that DNA/RNA, which then escapes the cell to do it again elsewhere. You, by the way, impregnate your wife by getting your DNA into one of her cells, and having her cell replicate that DNA. It's different, but not totally different.
 

shunyadragon

shunyadragon
Premium Member
No they don't. They replicate by affection. They infect the host, and affect at the cellular level. To be exact.

https://www.amjmed.com/article/0002-9343(65)90190-7/pdf

Biochemistry of virus reproduction
DOI:Redirecting

PlumX Metrics
Viruses

virus
Viruses are microscopic biological agents that invade living hosts and infect their bodies by reproducing within their cell tissue.

PHOTOGRAPH BY MARYNA OLYAK

Science trumps your opinion.

2adb092b-1726-4e56-a0dd-30056756ddae.jpg

Viruses are tiny infectious agents that rely on living cells to multiply. They may use an animal, plant, or bacteria host to survive and reproduce. As such, there is some debate as to whether or not viruses should be considered living organisms. A virus that is outside of a host cell is known as a virion.

Not only are viruses microscopic, they are smaller than many other microbes, such as bacteria. Most viruses are only 20–400 nanometers in diameter, whereas human egg cells, for example, are about 120 micrometers in diameter, and the E. coli bacteria has a diameter of around 1 micrometer. Viruses are so small that they are best viewed using an electron microscope, which is how they were first visualized in the 1940s.

Viruses generally come in two forms: rods or spheres. However, bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) have a unique shape, with a geometric head and filamentous tail fibers. No matter the shape, all viruses consist of genetic material (DNA or RNA) and have an outer protein shell, known as a capsid.

There are two processes used by viruses to replicate: the lytic cycle and lysogenic cycle. Some viruses reproduce using both methods, while others only use the lytic cycle. In the lytic cycle, the virus attaches to the host cell and injects its DNA. Using the host’s cellular metabolism, the viral DNA begins to replicate and form proteins. Then fully formed viruses assemble. These viruses break, or lyse, the cell and spread to other cells to continue the cycle.

Like the lytic cycle, in the lysogenic cycle the virus attaches to the host cell and injects its DNA. From there, the viral DNA gets incorporated into the host’s DNA and the host’s cells. Each time the host’s cells go through replication, the virus’s DNA gets replicated as well, spreading its genetic information throughout the host without having to lyse the infected cells.

In humans, viruses can cause many diseases. For example, the flu is caused by the influenza virus. Typically, viruses cause an immune response in the host, and this kills the virus. However, some viruses are not successfully treated by the immune system, such as human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV. This leads to a more chronic infection that is difficult or impossible to cure; often only the symptoms can be treated.

Unlike bacterial infections, antibiotics are ineffective at treating viral infections. Viral infections are best prevented by vaccines, though antiviral drugs can treat some viral infections. Most antiviral drugs work by interfering with viral replication. Some of these drugs stop DNA synthesis, preventing the virus from replicating

Although viruses can have devastating health consequences, they also have important technological applications. Viruses are particularly vital to gene therapy. Because some viruses incorporate their DNA into host DNA, they can be genetically modified to carry genes that would benefit the host. Some viruses can even be engineered to reproduce in cancer cells and trigger the immune system to kill those harmful cells. Although this is still an emerging field of research, it gives viruses the potential to one day do more good than harm.



2adb092b-1726-4e56-a0dd-30056756ddae_c111-0-1888-1333_r160x120.jpg

Viruses are microscopic biological agents that invade living hosts and infect their bodies by reproducing within their cell tissue.

Photograph by Maryna Olyak

Science trumps opinions every time.
 
Last edited:

Cooky

Veteran Member
It does this by getting it's own DNA or RNA into the host cell, and having that host cell replicate that DNA/RNA, which then escapes the cell to do it again elsewhere. You, by the way, impregnate your wife by getting your DNA into one of her cells, and having her cell replicate that DNA. It's different, but not totally different.

It's totally different. It would be the same if I injected my wife with my DNA and she became me, and then went around injecting my DNA into other people, and they all became me.

It's also different because there is nothing "new" being created, unlike egg fertilization in animals, where a third person is "born"... There is no "birth" in viruses... No new thing being created.

The English language lacks in many ways. This is one of them.
 

Cooky

Veteran Member
https://www.amjmed.com/article/0002-9343(65)90190-7/pdf

Biochemistry of virus reproduction
DOI:Redirecting

PlumX Metrics
Viruses

virus
Viruses are microscopic biological agents that invade living hosts and infect their bodies by reproducing within their cell tissue.

PHOTOGRAPH BY MARYNA OLYAK

Science trumps your opinion.

2adb092b-1726-4e56-a0dd-30056756ddae.jpg

Viruses are tiny infectious agents that rely on living cells to multiply. They may use an animal, plant, or bacteria host to survive and reproduce. As such, there is some debate as to whether or not viruses should be considered living organisms. A virus that is outside of a host cell is known as a virion.

Not only are viruses microscopic, they are smaller than many other microbes, such as bacteria. Most viruses are only 20–400 nanometers in diameter, whereas human egg cells, for example, are about 120 micrometers in diameter, and the E. coli bacteria has a diameter of around 1 micrometer. Viruses are so small that they are best viewed using an electron microscope, which is how they were first visualized in the 1940s.

Viruses generally come in two forms: rods or spheres. However, bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) have a unique shape, with a geometric head and filamentous tail fibers. No matter the shape, all viruses consist of genetic material (DNA or RNA) and have an outer protein shell, known as a capsid.

There are two processes used by viruses to replicate: the lytic cycle and lysogenic cycle. Some viruses reproduce using both methods, while others only use the lytic cycle. In the lytic cycle, the virus attaches to the host cell and injects its DNA. Using the host’s cellular metabolism, the viral DNA begins to replicate and form proteins. Then fully formed viruses assemble. These viruses break, or lyse, the cell and spread to other cells to continue the cycle.

Like the lytic cycle, in the lysogenic cycle the virus attaches to the host cell and injects its DNA. From there, the viral DNA gets incorporated into the host’s DNA and the host’s cells. Each time the host’s cells go through replication, the virus’s DNA gets replicated as well, spreading its genetic information throughout the host without having to lyse the infected cells.

In humans, viruses can cause many diseases. For example, the flu is caused by the influenza virus. Typically, viruses cause an immune response in the host, and this kills the virus. However, some viruses are not successfully treated by the immune system, such as human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV. This leads to a more chronic infection that is difficult or impossible to cure; often only the symptoms can be treated.

Unlike bacterial infections, antibiotics are ineffective at treating viral infections. Viral infections are best prevented by vaccines, though antiviral drugs can treat some viral infections. Most antiviral drugs work by interfering with viral replication. Some of these drugs stop DNA synthesis, preventing the virus from replicating

Although viruses can have devastating health consequences, they also have important technological applications. Viruses are particularly vital to gene therapy. Because some viruses incorporate their DNA into host DNA, they can be genetically modified to carry genes that would benefit the host. Some viruses can even be engineered to reproduce in cancer cells and trigger the immune system to kill those harmful cells. Although this is still an emerging field of research, it gives viruses the potential to one day do more good than harm.



2adb092b-1726-4e56-a0dd-30056756ddae_c111-0-1888-1333_r160x120.jpg

Viruses are microscopic biological agents that invade living hosts and infect their bodies by reproducing within their cell tissue.

Photograph by Maryna Olyak

Science trumps opinions every time.

"Reproduction" is just a generic English term. Don't let inferior language dictate understanding... There is no science in semantics.

...I see no harm in creating a dichotomy between viral cell invasion / hijacking, and reproduction where a new, third being is created.

...There's no benefit in bundling these similar yet different things into one concept.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Father Heathen

Veteran Member
They say that smog-filled skies and murky, polluted waters have begun to clear up due to less activity.

*High fives Satan*

But seriously, it's called nature, and it isn't "good" or "evil". It just is.
 

shunyadragon

shunyadragon
Premium Member
"Reproduction" is just a generic English term. Don't let inferior language dictate understanding... There is no science in semantics.

...I see no harm in creating a dichotomy between viral cell invasion / hijacking, and reproduction where a new, third being is created.

...There's no benefit in bundling these similar yet different things into one concept.

Your expressing an opinion, and I am citing the use of the words in science. There is no benefit in separating for personal preference and opinion. There is no need for semantics in science. Science uses both terms for virus reproduction, and than defines they type of reproduction.

Science trumps opinion every time.

The issue is the foolish superstitions question.
Is Coronavirus from the devil?
 
Last edited:

Cooky

Veteran Member
Your expressing an opinion, and I am citing science.

Science trumps opinion every time.

No you're not. There is nothing scientific about the semantics or the English language. I'm sure other, more superior languages differentiate between viral cell invasion, and actual reproduction, where a new creature is 'born'.

....But I'm not going to constrain my understanding by the low standards and expectations of an inferior language.
 

Shadow Wolf

Certified People sTabber
It's holy
All the selfish greed and total disregard for the safety, health, and who being of others is not what I'd call holy.
No new thing being created.
Yes. As was cited, twice at least, after after a virus has injected a cell, with the lytic cycle new viruses are formed, which are freed, hatched in a way, when the cell busts open.
Almost, kind of in a way, sort of like a cellular pregnancy.
 

Evangelicalhumanist

"Truth" isn't a thing...
Premium Member
It's totally different. It would be the same if I injected my wife with my DNA and she became me, and then went around injecting my DNA into other people, and they all became me.

It's also different because there is nothing "new" being created, unlike egg fertilization in animals, where a third person is "born"... There is no "birth" in viruses... No new thing being created.

The English language lacks in many ways. This is one of them.
Nope, quite incorrect. Nobody can "become" you -- they are copies of you. If you've ever used a photocopier, you might have noticed that while you get several copies, the original remains. Those copies are new things, altogether separate from the original.

This is analagous to viral replication, in which the cell is entered by the viral DNA/RNA, which is transcribed within the cell, using the cell's machinery, viral components are manufactured using the host's existing organelles ((viral protein synthesis, structural proteins, non-structural enzymes used in genome replication, etc.), a new virion is assembled, and then it is released.

Please stop making pseudo-scientific pronouncements about which you know too little.
 

shunyadragon

shunyadragon
Premium Member
No you're not. There is nothing scientific about the semantics or the English language. I'm sure other, more superior languages differentiate between viral cell invasion, and actual reproduction, where a new creature is 'born'.

....But I'm not going to constrain my understanding by the low standards and expectations of an inferior language.

I did cite science and you choose to ignore it.

The issue is the foolish superstitions question.
Is Coronavirus from the devil?
 
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