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Is there such a thing as a universal religion?

Kfox

Well-Known Member
Here's the way Hinduism looks at it (or at least how I look at it as a Hindu).

You, I, and a pilot can be in Chicago and decide to take a trip to Los Angeles. You can drive car to Los Angeles. A pilot can fly a plane to Los Angeles. I can ride a train to Los Angeles.

You claim the highway is the true path to Los Angeles. The pilot claims the sky is the true path to Los Angeles. I claim the tracks are the true path to Los Angles.

Which path is false?
Does the driver, the pilot, and the train operator each claim their path is better than the other two? Or do they all agree all paths are equal.
 

McBell

Resident Sourpuss
Here's the way Hinduism looks at it (or at least how I look at it as a Hindu).

You, I, and a pilot can be in Chicago and decide to take a trip to Los Angeles. You can drive car to Los Angeles. A pilot can fly a plane to Los Angeles. I can ride a train to Los Angeles.

You claim the highway is the true path to Los Angeles. The pilot claims the sky is the true path to Los Angeles. I claim the tracks are the true path to Los Angles.

Which path is false?
Which one(s) claim their path is the ONLY true path?
 

SalixIncendium

अग्निविलोवनन्दः
Staff member
Premium Member
Does the driver, the pilot, and the train operator each claim their path is better than the other two? Or do they all agree all paths are equal.
They understand that while they partake in debate over one another's paths, it's the destination that matters.
 

SalixIncendium

अग्निविलोवनन्दः
Staff member
Premium Member
Which one(s) claim their path is the ONLY true path?
You can be the pilot. From the pilot's perspective, which one is the ONLY true path? Do you think Los Angeles cannot be reached by driving or by rail?
 

McBell

Resident Sourpuss
You can be the pilot. From the pilot's perspective, which one is the ONLY true path? Do you think Los Angeles cannot be reached by driving or by rail?
Los Angeles can be reached by any number of different methods and routes.

Interesting that you did not answer the question posed.
 

exchemist

Veteran Member
What a derivative answer.
Actually, Schrödinger was very much taken with the Hindu Upanishads, especially when he was struggling with the Copenhagen interpretation. And Oppenheimer of course quoted that line from the Bhagavad Gita when the bomb went off.

But I'm not aware that Feynman was interested in Hinduism.
 

SalixIncendium

अग्निविलोवनन्दः
Staff member
Premium Member
Los Angeles can be reached by any number of different methods and routes.

Interesting that you did not answer the question posed.
You're right. I led you to your answer. There is no "ONLY true path."

You're welcome.
 

McBell

Resident Sourpuss
Thank you.

We'll speak again when you decide you can speak to me with civility and respect.
I asked a simple question.
Instead of merely answering it you went off into left field.

It is cute how you think I am the one being uncivil and disrespectful...
 

Trailblazer

Veteran Member
How would Baha'i not alienate religious people who aren't theistic or aren't monotheistic? Or are animistic or doesn't recognize divinity in a similar way? I've seen people say that Baha'i is flexible with its approach but imo that's a far cry from being universalizing. Unless you decide that universalizing just means non-interference.
The Baha'i Faith will alienate some people, I never said it wouldn't. When people of different beliefs hear what we believe many of them will be alienated. However, that does not mean the Baha'i Faith is not a universalizing religion. Universalizing means we welcome anyone and everyone who wishes to adopt our belief system. It doesn't mean that our belief system will appeal to everyone.

Universalizing Religions

First, let’s look at the definition of universalizing religion. Universalizing religions offer belief systems that are attractive to the universal population. They look for new members and welcome anyone and everyone who wishes to adopt their belief system. Universalizing religions have many diverse members, who come from different ethnic backgrounds, hence the term universal. Therefore, it is evident that universal religions consist of many different ethnic groups because they convert and accept anyone of any background and are usually not closely tied to one location.

Ethnic vs. Universalizing Religions: AP Human Geography Crash Course
 

ADigitalArtist

Veteran Member
Staff member
Premium Member
The Baha'i Faith will alienate some people, I never said it wouldn't. When people of different beliefs hear what we believe many of them will be alienated. However, that does not mean the Baha'i Faith is not a universalizing religion. Universalizing means we welcome anyone and everyone who wishes to adopt our belief system. It doesn't mean that our belief system will appeal to everyone.

Universalizing Religions

First, let’s look at the definition of universalizing religion. Universalizing religions offer belief systems that are attractive to the universal population. They look for new members and welcome anyone and everyone who wishes to adopt their belief system. Universalizing religions have many diverse members, who come from different ethnic backgrounds, hence the term universal. Therefore, it is evident that universal religions consist of many different ethnic groups because they convert and accept anyone of any background and are usually not closely tied to one location.

Ethnic vs. Universalizing Religions: AP Human Geography Crash Course
I see what you're saying, but I'm not sure that's the same universal the OP meant. I said 'alienate some' because of this bit:
without alienating anyone
 

Trailblazer

Veteran Member
I see what you're saying, but I'm not sure that's the same universal the OP meant. I said 'alienate some' because of this bit:
I understand your point...

And this bit that was in the OP:
Is it possible to have a truly universal religion that doesn't just end up being a bland, sterile philosophy?

To be honest, sometimes I think that Baha'i Faith is too dogmatic, but I have never been much for any religion.
I disagree with more than a few things that Baha'is hold dear but I Baha'i is because I believe that Baha'u'llah was a Messenger of God.
 

IndigoChild5559

Loving God and my neighbor as myself.
Or will every religion always be considered from a particular culture and carry those marks?

Is Christianity a universal religion? Islam? Given their Middle Eastern focus, their almost exclusive interest in a limited geographical area, Semitic language and concepts not known by those outside that culture, limited view of history etc.

Is it possible to have a truly universal religion that doesn't just end up being a bland, sterile philosophy?
I suppose it all depends on what you mean by universal. If you mean a religion designed to be for all people everywhere, then Christianity is universal. If you mean a religion which is practiced all around the world, then yes, Christianity would be universal. If you mean a religion that everyone believes, then of course, Christianity is not universal in that sense. The same can be said of Islam.
 

Rival

se Dex me saut.
Staff member
Premium Member
I suppose it all depends on what you mean by universal. If you mean a religion designed to be for all people everywhere, then Christianity is universal. If you mean a religion which is practiced all around the world, then yes, Christianity would be universal. If you mean a religion that everyone believes, then of course, Christianity is not universal in that sense. The same can be said of Islam.
No. I didn't mean any of those things.

Read the OP.
 
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