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(Catholics) Why do some Catholic churches do the wine drinking ceremony and other Catholic churches don't?

Why do some Catholic churches do the wine drinking ceremony and other Catholic churches don't? Some churches do it with the eucharist, but other churches don't do it at all. This happens during Holy Communion.
 
The consecration at Mass always involves wine. But the laity only need to take the host for a valid communion.
I've been to many Catholic churches across north America, Central America, and the Caribbean do the wine drinking ceremony and other Catholic churches don't.
 

King Phenomenon

Well-Known Member
Some churches prolly think it’s gross for hundreds of people to drink out of the same cup and also kids can’t do it. Idk I’m guessing
 
It's called receiving Communion. It's not called "the wine drinking ceremony."

And the pastor of each parish decides whether to offer Communion under both kinds, so that's why it varies from parish to parish.
I think you misunderstand. Communion is the overall which includes the eating of the Eucharist ceremony (The Body) and drinking of the wine ceremony (The Blood). Some churches don't do the wine drinking. That is why I'm asking about this in this thread.
 

anna.

but mostly it's the same
I think you misunderstand. Communion is the overall which includes the eating of the Eucharist ceremony (The Body) and drinking of the wine ceremony (The Blood). Some churches don't do the wine drinking. That is why I'm asking about this in this thread.

Semi-humorously, I'm willing to cut you some slack if English is your second language or you're a recent convert. If you're neither of these, you should know how to talk about Holy Communion in a way that doesn't sound foreign to Catholicism.

Anyway, I did answer your OP question, I hope it helps.
 

exchemist

Veteran Member
I think you misunderstand. Communion is the overall which includes the eating of the Eucharist ceremony (The Body) and drinking of the wine ceremony (The Blood). Some churches don't do the wine drinking. That is why I'm asking about this in this thread.
This is factually incorrect.

1) "The Eucharist" refers to both consecrated bread and wine.

2) They are not distinct "ceremonies". The "ceremony" is the celebration of mass, which involves the consecration of both bread and wine and their consumption at communion by the priest and congregation, in fulfilment of Christ's command at the Last Supper.

In most day-to-day masses in the Catholic church, only the consecrated host (bread) is distributed to the people, the priest alone consuming the wine. This is simply for practical reasons, as it takes longer to give communion "under both kinds" and there are a lot of people queuing up at many masses. However on special occasions communion under both kinds can be offered, for instance to a couple at their nuptial mass, or on Maundy Thursday which commemorates the Last Supper, and so on. More here: Communion under both kinds - Wikipedia

In the Orthodox and Anglican churches, both are usually administered.
 
This is factually incorrect.

1) "The Eucharist" refers to both consecrated bread and wine.

2) They are not distinct "ceremonies". The "ceremony" is the celebration of mass, which involves the consecration of both bread and wine and their consumption at communion by the priest and congregation, in fulfilment of Christ's command at the Last Supper.

In most day-to-day masses in the Catholic church, only the consecrated host (bread) is distributed to the people, the priest alone consuming the wine. This is simply for practical reasons, as it takes longer to give communion "under both kinds" and there are a lot of people queuing up at many masses. However on special occasions communion under both kinds can be offered, for instance to a couple at their nuptial mass, or on Maundy Thursday which commemorates the Last Supper, and so on. More here: Communion under both kinds - Wikipedia

In the Orthodox and Anglican churches, both are usually administered.
Thanks for your input, but I still don't know why some churches drink the wine and others don't.
 

exchemist

Veteran Member
Thanks for your input, but I still don't know why some churches drink the wine and others don't.
It's up to the local bishop and the parish priest. I've explained the rationale in my previous post. Here in the UK, offering the congregation the wine is exceptional, as it takes more time, requires more people to administer it, has a hygiene aspect (being banned during the covid epidemic, for instance) and there is the problem of potential spillage. Basically more things to go wrong and to worry about - and in any case not liturgically necessary.

But of course it's a nice thing to give both, when the occasion allows.
 

Glaurung

Denizen of Niflheim
I've been to many Catholic churches across north America, Central America, and the Caribbean do the wine drinking ceremony and other Catholic churches don't.
It will depend on the circumstances of each parish. A valid Mass will always involve the consecration of both species (bread and wine). But it is not mandatory to offer the chalice to the congregation.
 

Subduction Zone

Veteran Member
It's up to the local bishop and the parish priest. I've explained the rationale in my previous post. Here in the UK, offering the congregation the wine is exceptional, as it takes more time, requires more people to administer it, has a hygiene aspect (being banned during the covid epidemic, for instance) and there is the problem of potential spillage. Basically more things to go wrong and to worry about - and in any case not liturgically necessary.

But of course it's a nice thing to give both, when the occasion allows.
Where I grew up we had small individual cups to drink from. Like this:

1693968303410.png


But for the last year of my mother's life I drove her everywhere and would even go into church with her (no one caught on fire). I would have been welcome to partake, but as no longer a Christian I thought that it would be disrespectful. That church had a single large cup and the pastor had a cloth to wipe it. I do not think that would have been very sanitary. I wonder how many went back to those small individual cups as a result of covid.

And some churches would use actual wine and some would use a nonalcoholic grape juice. Though if one reads the Bible in context it is clear that they were drinking wine quite often.
 

F1fan

Veteran Member
This is factually incorrect.

1) "The Eucharist" refers to both consecrated bread and wine.

2) They are not distinct "ceremonies". The "ceremony" is the celebration of mass, which involves the consecration of both bread and wine and their consumption at communion by the priest and congregation, in fulfilment of Christ's command at the Last Supper.

In most day-to-day masses in the Catholic church, only the consecrated host (bread) is distributed to the people, the priest alone consuming the wine. This is simply for practical reasons, as it takes longer to give communion "under both kinds" and there are a lot of people queuing up at many masses. However on special occasions communion under both kinds can be offered, for instance to a couple at their nuptial mass, or on Maundy Thursday which commemorates the Last Supper, and so on. More here: Communion under both kinds - Wikipedia

In the Orthodox and Anglican churches, both are usually administered.
As a kid I had the misfortune of being dragged to Mass with my cousins a few times, and back then they did the wine thing. The whole damn congregation would line up and the preist allowed each member to take a sip and then get a wafer. I never went up there, but man as a 12 year old I was thinking "Hey, I got someplace I got to be, can we wrap this up?" OMG, I didn't know what hell was until I went to Mass.
 
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