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Your Favorite Part of a Religion You Don't Practice?

Howdy.

I was thinking about how we tend to view other ideologies and theologies through particular lenses that might drastically shape the way we see them.

So this made me curious, what is your favorite practice or belief from a religion you do not practice? I could not select one so ended up doing a few.

For my own part despite not being Mormon I do like the idea of the Plat of Zion. For those of you not in the know it was a plan laid down by Smith for organizing a self sufficient community.

Plat of the City of Zion, circa Early June–25 June 1833, Page 1

I also like the story of St. Moses the Black. St. Moses the Black was a Coptic monk who was originally a criminal but redeemed himself and ended up becoming a monk and then later on a Saint.
Moses the Black - Wikipedia

Saint Francis of Assisi is quite possibly one of my favorite Christians throughout history. The stories of his life are pretty neat and one of my favorites in the story of Francis speaking with the Sultan of Egypt.

St. Francis and the Sultan: An encounter of peace between Christians and Muslims

Although Saint Francis did not write the prayer of st. Francis I still find it rather inspiring. He was a man of such character that he inspired this prayer.

Lord, make me an instrument of your peace:
where there is hatred, let me sow love;
where there is injury, pardon;
where there is doubt, faith;
where there is despair, hope;
where there is darkness, light;
where there is sadness, joy.

O divine Master, grant that I may not so much seek
to be consoled as to console,
to be understood as to understand,
to be loved as to love.
For it is in giving that we receive,
it is in pardoning that we are pardoned,
and it is in dying that we are born to eternal life.
Amen.
 

Twilight Hue

Twilight, not bright nor dark, good nor bad.
I do very little meditation on a cushion. I apply those techniques to my daily life, and particularly at work, where my job is very repetitive.

I regard my workweek as my Sesshin period.
 

sun rise

The world is on fire
Premium Member
My choice would be Kabbalah not for the orthodox aspects including clothing, but for what I've read. Their teachings are very close to my own path. Four examples:

"As it is written ‘and he (Abraham) called there, in the name of G-d, El-Olam…’ specifically…[G-d-World] El-Olam, and not El-ha-Olam [G-d of the World]; this means to imply, that neither G-d or the world are independent entities, nor that G-d rules over the world, but [rather that] the world and G-d are all One, and that ‘there is nothing else!" Rebbe Menachem Mendel Schneerson (Lubavitcher Rebbe)

The times in which our generation lives are not ordinary times. We dwell on the interface between two worlds —a world as it was and a world as it is meant to be. Everything is in place, all the infrastructure to bind the world together as one the technology by which all of humanity can share deep wisdom, all that is needed so that the secret of oneness can be grasped within the human mind. The stage is set. All that’s left is for us to open our eyes. Rabbi Tzvi Freeman

"Beware of any system which discourages questioning. Anyone who stifles questions is afraid that it could uncover the falseness of the beliefs." Rabbi Noach Weinberg

"We don’t see things the way they are, we see things the way we are." The Talmud
 

Heyo

Veteran Member
Howdy.

I was thinking about how we tend to view other ideologies and theologies through particular lenses that might drastically shape the way we see them.

So this made me curious, what is your favorite practice or belief from a religion you do not practice?
The thing I like about JWs is that they are radical pacifists and radical secularist. They are genuinely no harm to anybody but themselves and their kids.
 

ChristineM

"Be strong", I whispered to my coffee.
Premium Member
The thing I like about JWs is that they are radical pacifists and radical secularist. They are genuinely no harm to anybody but themselves and their kids.

And enyone they persuade to join their faith.

I had a friend (now dead) who, as a child his parents split up and essentially screwed up his childhood because his mother joined the JWs and his father was having none of it.
 

Heyo

Veteran Member
And enyone they persuade to join their faith.

I had a friend (now dead) who, as a child his parents split up and essentially screwed up his childhood because his mother joined the JWs and his father was having none of it.
So, his mother was a JW and she was a harm to her kid?
Don't become a JW (and don't let your parents or loved ones become a JW) and you are fine. With almost every other religion or denomination (except, maybe, Jains) there is a risk they may blow you up or ruin your life through legislation. That won't happen with JWs.
 

ChristineM

"Be strong", I whispered to my coffee.
Premium Member
So, his mother was a JW and she was a harm to her kid?
Don't become a JW (and don't let your parents or loved ones become a JW) and you are fine. With almost every other religion or denomination (except, maybe, Jains) there is a risk they may blow you up or ruin your life through legislation. That won't happen with JWs.

A when a childs parents separate it can be very traumatic. That's harm.
 

Brickjectivity

Turned to Stone. Now I stretch daily.
Staff member
Premium Member
I like it when religious people wear their hats. I admit that this is not respectful, but I just like seeing the different people wearing the different hats. I may not like anything else and may feel like I'm in weirdsville, but I like the various hats.

I'd wear a nondescript baseball cap that did not label me, my politics or anything. I wouldn't go out in public in a cowboy hat, top-hat, etc. but I like that people wear them. Its different. Its like finding a new restaurant or an unusual house. It makes things look more interesting.
 
I like it when religious people wear their hats. I admit that this is not respectful, but I just like seeing the different people wearing the different hats. I may not like anything else and may feel like I'm in weirdsville, but I like the various hats.

I'd wear a nondescript baseball cap that did not label me, my politics or anything. I wouldn't go out in public in a cowboy hat, top-hat, etc. but I like that people wear them. Its different. Its like finding a new restaurant or an unusual house. It makes things look more interesting.
I have considered wearing a turban out in public but I need better wrapping to make it work. Hats are fun!
 

RestlessSoul

Well-Known Member
Meditation is not exclusive to Buddhism, obviously, but it’s increasingly widespread practice in the West is probably in large part due to Buddhist influence. I find it helpful in all sorts of ways.
 

Viker

Häxan
I just like rituals any where from any one.

I'm crazy about whirling Dervishes. I have a similar form of trance and meditation ritual.
 

IndigoChild5559

Loving God and my neighbor as myself.
Howdy.

I was thinking about how we tend to view other ideologies and theologies through particular lenses that might drastically shape the way we see them.

So this made me curious, what is your favorite practice or belief from a religion you do not practice? I could not select one so ended up doing a few.

For my own part despite not being Mormon I do like the idea of the Plat of Zion. For those of you not in the know it was a plan laid down by Smith for organizing a self sufficient community.

Plat of the City of Zion, circa Early June–25 June 1833, Page 1

I also like the story of St. Moses the Black. St. Moses the Black was a Coptic monk who was originally a criminal but redeemed himself and ended up becoming a monk and then later on a Saint.
Moses the Black - Wikipedia

Saint Francis of Assisi is quite possibly one of my favorite Christians throughout history. The stories of his life are pretty neat and one of my favorites in the story of Francis speaking with the Sultan of Egypt.

St. Francis and the Sultan: An encounter of peace between Christians and Muslims

Although Saint Francis did not write the prayer of st. Francis I still find it rather inspiring. He was a man of such character that he inspired this prayer.

Lord, make me an instrument of your peace:
where there is hatred, let me sow love;
where there is injury, pardon;
where there is doubt, faith;
where there is despair, hope;
where there is darkness, light;
where there is sadness, joy.

O divine Master, grant that I may not so much seek
to be consoled as to console,
to be understood as to understand,
to be loved as to love.
For it is in giving that we receive,
it is in pardoning that we are pardoned,
and it is in dying that we are born to eternal life.
Amen.
When I was much younger, I used to have Shabbat Table at my home for many visitors each Friday night. Shabbat Table is an elaborate meal. I used to do fish first, then soup, then salad, then the main course, and end with dessert. Everyone ate until they were stuffed, and there was lots of food left over for Saturday. I would sometimes fall asleep as the conversation went late into the night. It gave me great pleasure to provide a completely kosher meal in a shomer Shabbat home that all Jews would feel welcome in. But today I'm disabled, and simply can't handle the work it takes. Of course, it was never a requirement that I open my home for such a feast, but it is still part of the Jewish tradition of hospitality. It's very sad. I miss it a lot.
 

Heyo

Veteran Member
When I was much younger, I used to have Shabbat Table at my home for many visitors each Friday night. Shabbat Table is an elaborate meal. I used to do fish first, then soup, then salad, then the main course, and end with dessert. Everyone ate until they were stuffed, and there was lots of food left over for Saturday. I would sometimes fall asleep as the conversation went late into the night. It gave me great pleasure to provide a completely kosher meal in a shomer Shabbat home that all Jews would feel welcome in. But today I'm disabled, and simply can't handle the work it takes. Of course, it was never a requirement that I open my home for such a feast, but it is still part of the Jewish tradition of hospitality. It's very sad. I miss it a lot.
Have you asked your guests if they would be willing to prepare the meals in your home so that the tradition could continue?
 

IndigoChild5559

Loving God and my neighbor as myself.
Have you asked your guests if they would be willing to prepare the meals in your home so that the tradition could continue?
I don't think it would be hospitable to invite guests over and then expect them to work, no.

I do occasionally go over to OTHER Jewish homes for Shabbat Table, so the tradition isn't entirely dead.
 
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