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What does Atheistic Advaita lack?

Discussion in 'General Religious Debates' started by Aupmanyav, Oct 19, 2021.

  1. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Be your own guru

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    Those of you who have interacted with me know that my type of Advaita Hinduism denies a whole host of things, e.g., Gods/Goddesses, soul, heaven, hell, birth or death, rebirth/reincarnation, final judgment, any sort of deliverance with the help of an agency - moksha; and even creation of the universe. What it does not deny is existence of Brahman and 'dharma'. So, the question - Does Atheistic Advaita lack anything?
     
    #1 Aupmanyav, Oct 19, 2021
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2021
  2. epronovost

    epronovost Well-Known Member

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    Well, in my opinion, it has to much of that Brahman and "dharma" thing. Ever considered loosing those too?
     
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  3. Unveiled Artist

    Unveiled Artist Veteran Member

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    Why does it lack belief in reincarnation?

    I would assume beliefs are part of one's reality or how they define it rather than something separated just by "not believing."
     
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  4. The Hammer

    The Hammer Wyrd Walker
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    It lacks all the things you mentioned?
     
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  5. mangalavara

    mangalavara Verified Account ✔
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    Why should a person consider losing dharma?
     
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  6. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Be your own guru

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    No. I can't. Without Brahman, nothing will exist, that is the building block of all things that we observe (jagat - that which moves or is alive, or samsara - that which passes through a succession of states); and without 'dharma', human society will not exist.
    Rebirth or reincarnation of each molecule of our body separately after our so-called 'death' as part of another living or non-living entity does happen, that is chemical recycling. That is not the usual understanding of rebirth/reincarnation/resurrection. Our individuality is lost irretrievably after our so-called 'death'. We cannot come back in any physical or astral form. We live only once.
     
    #6 Aupmanyav, Oct 19, 2021
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  7. mangalavara

    mangalavara Verified Account ✔
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    I have no idea if your Atheistic Advaita lacks anything. After all, it is your spirituality and way of life, not mine. :)

    Is the doctrine of karma part of Atheistic Advaita? My understanding of karma, by the way, is not the mysterious and punitive Western one: 'What goes around comes around.' My view of karma is rooted in the Upaniṣads: we become what we do. If a human being, for example, is lazy, eats without measure, and is ruled by his passions instead of using reason and cultivating virtue, he becomes an animal, metaphorically speaking. As a believer in the jīvātman, I believe that such a person will very likely be born an actual animal in the next life. On the other hand, the human being who is active in dharma, exercises self-control and other virtues, is generous, and looks towards the celestial becomes divine, metaphorically speaking. Her next incarnation might even be as a devi. If karma is part of Atheistic Advaita, what is your understanding of it?
     
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  8. Valjean

    Valjean Veteran Member
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  9. epronovost

    epronovost Well-Known Member

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    Too many meanings, too many rules and addendum, that sort of reason. Dharma has been used for so long, in so many context to express so many ideas, sometime contradictory, that it's practically an abused term like "sin" or "providence".
     
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  10. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Be your own guru

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    I agree to that. It is a chancy world. It is possible that someone who does good may not be benefited, and someone who does evil will necessarily harmed in some way. Many people will escape (what you will say) punishment in this, the only life that one has. Since I do not believe in rebirth, all the action and reaction is limited to this life. Nothing is carried over because there is nothing where it can be carried over.
    My simple and straight-forward definition of 'dharma' is the rules of the society in which one lives, which includes following the law of the land where one lives. This is not static and will change with time. What contradiction do you find in this?
    Gunas, inherited or acquired, and Samskaras, training, education, are what make the individuality of a person; properties in computer lingo. ;)
     
    #10 Aupmanyav, Oct 19, 2021
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  11. mangalavara

    mangalavara Verified Account ✔
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    Sounds like we ought to get rid of language and civilization too. :rolleyes:
     
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  12. Truthseeker9

    Truthseeker9 Non-debating member when I can help myself

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    For me, Brahman is the alternate definition of God by some Hindus. It is an impersonal God. It is not that for you, obviously.

    I'll not speak of what you lack except for the recognition of Brahman as being an alternate definition of God.
     
  13. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Be your own guru

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    Yeah, true. Brahman is the stuff of Jagat, Samsara, and not a personal or impersonal God for me.
     
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