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Ritualism in Belief Systems.

Discussion in 'Seekers Circle' started by Ellen Brown, Aug 11, 2019.

  1. Ellen Brown

    Ellen Brown Well-Known Member
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    I suppose (?) the first ritualism that "I" know of is the Tabernacle that Moses had built. Apparently there is a model of it in the Timna Valley Park in Israel.

    Much later, Muslims repeat a beautiful ritual 5 times a day, with ritual washing (Wudu), repetitive prayers and prostrations.

    These days, most belief systems feature heavy ritualism, some more than others. I wonder if these rituals please God in light of the fact that the world seems on the verge of war all the time?

    For me, the extent of my ritualism is that I try to only pray when I am on my knees. Most often the prayer is intercession for another person, or for God to sharpen my memory. Being alone, as painful as it is at times, it seems easier to focus on God.
     
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  2. sun rise

    sun rise "Let there be peace and love among all"
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    To me ritual is a hindrance when it's done superficially or in the sense of magic. It's a help when done whole-heartedly with real feeling.
     
  3. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Be your own guru

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    Rituals are very important in Hinduism. They are not for deities, but to put the person in the correct religious frame of mind, and they are very detailed. Pre-ritual rituals are longer than the actual ritual. The general Hindu way is to sit cross-legged during rituals. Intercession of deities for other people is not the main purpose of Hindu rituals, that is said at the end of the ritual and covers all (humans, animals and vegetation). This is known as 'Shānti Pāth' (the Peace Mantra). That is 'Amen' for us.

    I am removing the image to give a better literal pronunciation and meaning of the Peace Mantra (it is not perfect in the image, IMHO. The image location is given at the end):

    "Dyavah Shānti, Antarikshah Shānti, Shānti Prithivi, Shānti Ā́pah;
    Shānti Aushadhayah, Shānti Vanaspatayah;
    Shānti Vishvedevāh, Shānti Brahmā Shānti Sarvah Shānti;
    Shānti Eva, Shānti Sā Mā Shānti Edhi;
    Shānti, Shānti, Shānti."

    May the heavens be at peace, May the sky be at peace, May the Earth be at peace, May the Waters be at peace;
    May the herbs be at peace, May the vegetation be at peace;
    May the deities of the world be at peace, peace be in the Supreme Being Brahman, peace, may peace be everywhere;
    May there only be peace, peace to others, peace to me here;
    Peace, peace, peace.

    Shanti Mantras - Wikipedia
    https://i.pinimg.com/474x/80/f1/37/80f1374aca7b37105b7af7740e146e3a--yoga-mantras-hindu-mantras.jpg

    Note: 'Waters' (Ā́pah) have a slightly different meaning in RigVeda. It is not only the terrestrial water but also something like the juice of all life which Goddess Saraswati brings to Earth from heavens descending from the Milky Way galaxy. :)
     
    #3 Aupmanyav, Aug 12, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2019
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  4. Amanaki

    Amanaki Well-Known Member

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    I don't do any rituals so it is a bit difficult to answer why it is so important to others.
    Meditation to me is not a ritual
     
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  5. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Be your own guru

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    Don't know about Theravadins, but Tibetans and Mahayanists have lot of rituals. Meditation is a part of Hinduism also, though what it means differ from person to person. I do not believe in vaccous meditation as in Hinduism and Buddhism. I will contemplate on a question, if I have one, to try to find the answer. I do not have any unanswered questions in my mind except one - Is existence the same as non-existence? Are they just phases like in case of 'virtual particles'? I do not think science will be able to answer this question in my life time and this question will go with me when my individuality ceases. :)
     
    #5 Aupmanyav, Aug 12, 2019
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  6. danieldemol

    danieldemol Well-Known Member
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    I feel that our rituals don’t matter to God so long as we lead virtuous lives
     
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  7. Amanaki

    Amanaki Well-Known Member

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    Yes, they have. But for me as Theravadin rituals are none important. As far as we know Buddha Sakyamuni did not teach rituals :)
    But if you look in monasteries within Theravada tradition you will also find rituals there.
     
  8. Firemorphic

    Firemorphic Activist Membrane

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    True, it's also an essential aspect of any religion. The actual practice and devotion, from deep inner expression, is were the meat really is in every religion. Without the pure, strong and willful intention it would be rather a useless waste of time. It is were a great portion of one's inner transformation is to be found and were the enlightenment at the end of the tunnel is to also be found. "Practice what you preach" takes on a very powerful, experiential meaning in this exposition.
     
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  9. Firemorphic

    Firemorphic Activist Membrane

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    Interesting, do you Theravadins set out schedules or anything for your Meditations?

    I'm more familiar with other forms of Buddhism, which are heavily ritualistic (and for very good reason), so this intrigues me. I know though that Theravada, while holding all the same primary principles, focus on a very different path of Dharma to the other schools/sects.
     
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  10. Amanaki

    Amanaki Well-Known Member

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    Personally, I meditate in the evening, but I think many lay Theravadins do not think of a time they meditate. Monks in monasteries do have certain times of the day that is for meditation
     
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  11. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Be your own guru

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    Hindus do have schedules. It was a five time worship of the 'household-fire' (Garhpatya Agni) in pre-Vedic, pre-Zoroastrian times, mandated for any married couple for all their life. Today, the normal is three times 'Sandhya' (time when one phase of the day meets the other, i.e., Night/day, forenoon/afternoon and day/night). I do not have any such schedules. I don't even meditate now, since I have no unanswered questions (as I said except one for which the answer is not currently available however hard one may try). The question was first raised in RigVeda 3,000 years ago.

    Sato bandhumasati niravindan hridi prtishyakavayo manisha ll
    Sages who searched with their heart's thought discovered the existent's kinship in the non-existent.
    Rig Veda: Rig-Veda, Book 10: HYMN CXXIX. Creation.
     
    #11 Aupmanyav, Aug 12, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2019
  12. Thirza Fallen

    Thirza Fallen Crazy Cat Lady

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  13. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Be your own guru

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    Anasakti (Detachment), IMHO.

    "Jñeyaḥ sa nitya-sannyāsī, yo na dveṣṭi na kāṅkṣati; nirdvandvo hi, Mahā-bāho, sukhaṁ bandhāt pramucyate." BhagawadGita 5.3

    Know him as ever-renounced who neither hates nor desires. Such a person, free from all dualities, O mighty-armed (Arjuna), easily overcomes bondage and is completely liberated.
     
    #13 Aupmanyav, Aug 23, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2019
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