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Modi installs 'Dharma danda' in India's new parliament house

Aupmanyav

Be your own guru
chenkolparliament-1685082665.jpg

The scepter (RAj danDa) was given to Jawaharlal Nehru by Lord Mountbatten while transferring power from the British to India. The tradition belonged to the Chola dynasty. Prime Minister Modi installed the scepter in India's new parliament building. The bull at the top of the scepter symbolyzes 'Dharma' (Duty and Justice). The scepter has been installed next to the Speaker's seat.

PM-Modi-reaches-new-Parliament-building-ahead-of-inauguration.jpg

Prime Minister Modi carrying the Sengol (Tamil pronunciation closer to 'Chenkol') accompanied by the 21 heads of Tamil Adheenams (Monasteries) which are headed by non-brahmin Shaivites. The scapter was being kept in the museum in Allahabad at Nehru's ancestral home and was generally referred to as 'Nehru's golden walking stick'.

20230330275L.jpg

The new hall for Indian parliament, spacious, better equipped.
 

Vinayaka

devotee
Premium Member
chenkolparliament-1685082665.jpg

The scepter (RAj danDa) was given to Jawaharlal Nehru by Lord Mountbatten while transferring power from the British to India. The tradition belonged to the Chola dynasty. Prime Minister Modi installed the scepter in India's new parliament building. The bull at the top of the scepter symbolyzes 'Dharma' (Duty and Justice). The scepter has been installed next to the Speaker's seat.

PM-Modi-reaches-new-Parliament-building-ahead-of-inauguration.jpg

Prime Minister Modi carrying the Sengol (Tamil pronunciation closer to 'Chenkol') accompanied by the 21 heads of Tamil Adheenams (Monasteries) which are headed by non-brahmin Shaivites. The scapter was being kept in the museum in Allahabad at Nehru's ancestral home and was generally referred to as 'Nehru's golden walking stick'.

20230330275L.jpg

The new hall for Indian parliament, spacious, better equipped.
Here's a story on the scepter's origin. Sengol Story: How A Hindu Mutt In Tamil Nadu Initiated Transfer Of Power From British To India - The Commune
 

Aupmanyav

Be your own guru
I need to immigrate to Bhārat and change my career from teacher to parliamentarian. :p
That will be quite difficult. First thing, you will need to belong to a caste or religion because people vote for that. Secondly, you have to have q lot of money, millions to spare. Indian elections cannot be fought without money. :D
 

mangalavara

सो ऽहम्
Premium Member
First thing, you will need to belong to a caste or religion because people vote for that.

If people there vote for your caste, make me your dharma putra. Lol.

As for religion, do you mean sampradaya? I would probably just seek a guru within the Ramakrishna movement.

Secondly, you have to have q lot of money, millions to spare.

At the moment, I have the equivalent of just over 6 lakh rupees. I’ll have what’s required in a few more years.

I know a tiny bit of Hindi:

‘Namaskar. Mera nam Mangalvar hai.’

If Indian politicians have slogans, this would be mine:

‘Tuesday: a day you can trust!’

Of course, I know this would be an utter waste of money, especially for someone who wants nothing to do with politics in any country. :)
 

sayak83

Veteran Member
Staff member
Premium Member
chenkolparliament-1685082665.jpg

The scepter (RAj danDa) was given to Jawaharlal Nehru by Lord Mountbatten while transferring power from the British to India. The tradition belonged to the Chola dynasty. Prime Minister Modi installed the scepter in India's new parliament building. The bull at the top of the scepter symbolyzes 'Dharma' (Duty and Justice). The scepter has been installed next to the Speaker's seat.

PM-Modi-reaches-new-Parliament-building-ahead-of-inauguration.jpg

Prime Minister Modi carrying the Sengol (Tamil pronunciation closer to 'Chenkol') accompanied by the 21 heads of Tamil Adheenams (Monasteries) which are headed by non-brahmin Shaivites. The scapter was being kept in the museum in Allahabad at Nehru's ancestral home and was generally referred to as 'Nehru's golden walking stick'.

20230330275L.jpg

The new hall for Indian parliament, spacious, better equipped.
I am in principle strongly against the installation of any religious item or having any religious ritual in the parliament. The State and it's functionaries serve all its citizens and they should eschew showing affinity to or being subservient of any religion or belief system on public capacity. So I strongly oppose this installation and it's associated rituals.
 

mangalavara

सो ऽहम्
Premium Member
The State and it's functionaries serve all its citizens and they should eschew showing affinity to or being subservient of any religion or belief system on public capacity.

I have to agree. If I were an Indian citizen and saw something like that, I would especially feel uncomfortable if I were a Jain, Sikh, Muslim, or something else than Hindu. I would feel uncomfortable because I would wonder what the State would have in mind for me in the future. Likewise, as a Hindu, I would be uncomfortable if they were to install a tapestry of Ali ibn Abi Talib.

Your entire reply was very well said.
 

sayak83

Veteran Member
Staff member
Premium Member
I have to agree. If I were an Indian citizen and saw something like that, I would especially feel uncomfortable if I were a Jain, Sikh, Muslim, or something else than Hindu. I would feel uncomfortable because I would wonder what the State would have in mind for me in the future. Likewise, as a Hindu, I would be uncomfortable if they were to install a tapestry of Ali ibn Abi Talib.

Your entire reply was very well said.
I have to agree. If I were an Indian citizen and saw something like that, I would especially feel uncomfortable if I were a Jain, Sikh, Muslim, or something else than Hindu. I would feel uncomfortable because I would wonder what the State would have in mind for me in the future. Likewise, as a Hindu, I would be uncomfortable if they were to install a tapestry of Ali ibn Abi Talib.

Your entire reply was very well said.
Thanks. Frankly I have same problem with the UK whose head of state, the king (sic) gets annointed by a religious figure. Look at this figure
images

What does it speak of 21st century India when her head of state in a public ceremony of inauguration of Her new parliament does something like this? And this is considered a great PR victory splashed everywhere? Is India, as country subservient to some Brahminical monastic order? I believe our PM has gravely disrespected his position and our Nation's constitution in doing this.
Will get him votes though.. .that is for sure.
 

mangalavara

सो ऽहम्
Premium Member
What does it speak of 21st century India when her head of state in a public ceremony of inauguration of Her new parliament does something like this?

It makes it look like a Śaiva sampradaya is the state’s official religion. Additionally, it makes it look like someone does not respect the spirit of democracy. Again, if I were a citizen there and not Hindu, I would be worried about what they have in mind for me.
 

Vinayaka

devotee
Premium Member
Thanks. Frankly I have same problem with the UK whose head of state, the king (sic) gets annointed by a religious figure. Look at this figure
images

What does it speak of 21st century India when her head of state in a public ceremony of inauguration of Her new parliament does something like this? And this is considered a great PR victory splashed everywhere? Is India, as country subservient to some Brahminical monastic order? I believe our PM has gravely disrespected his position and our Nation's constitution in doing this.
Will get him votes though.. .that is for sure.
Well, they're non-Brahmins for starters. Britain has used scepters or maces as symbols for power for a long time. There is a mace in my local provincial legislature. It is used ceremonially for the opening and closing of legislative sessions. They can be found throughout the former British Commonwealth countries. This item was meant by Mountbatten to be used from the beginning of India's independence. Perhaps when the Nandi appeared on the 'weapon' he was disappointed, as he was probably expecting a cross.

 

Aupmanyav

Be your own guru
If people there vote for your caste, make me your dharma putra. Lol.
As for religion, do you mean sampradaya? I would probably just seek a guru within the Ramakrishna movement.
At the moment, I have the equivalent of just over 6 lakh rupees. I’ll have what’s required in a few more years.
I know a tiny bit of Hindi: ‘Namaskar. Mera nam Mangalvar hai.’
If Indian politicians have slogans, this would be mine: ‘Tuesday: a day you can trust!’
Of course, I know this would be an utter waste of money, especially for someone who wants nothing to do with politics in any country. :)
:D You are. As I said previously, you had prior acceptance from my side (if you remember). But becoming a brahmin does not get you many votes. They are a minority. Be a Yadav, be a Patel, be a Jat, etc.
:) No, I meant Hindu, Muslim, Christian, etc. In India, it is better to be a Muslim. They vote en-block and generally against Modi.
:) Use your Rupees 6 lakhs to buy cigarettes. Nothing less than 6 Crore will work to contest an election in India.
:) Hindi is for cities. You need to know Marwari, Haranvi, Bhojpuri, Maithil, Avadhi, etc. for villages.
:) That will do. 'Mangalmukhi sada sukhi' (What is started on a Tuesday will always be happy).
:) Thaaaat is wise. Generally one has to be a crook to be in politics, and you do not seem to be one.
 
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Aupmanyav

Be your own guru
I am in principle strongly against the installation of any religious item or having any religious ritual in the parliament. The State and it's functionaries serve all its citizens and they should eschew showing affinity to or being subservient of any religion or belief system on public capacity. So I strongly oppose this installation and it's associated rituals.
Sort of agree with you, but this is politics. That is why Gandhis visit temples and churches during election times and even take 'Ishtalinga deeksha'.
 

sayak83

Veteran Member
Staff member
Premium Member
Sort of agree with you, but this is politics. That is why Gandhis visit temples and churches during election times and even take 'Ishtalinga deeksha'.
I agree that politicization of religion, caste and ethnic and linguistic identity to get votes have been part and parcel of every politicians discourse. These are rife during campaign times. The EC should be stricter in these too. But doing it in the official inauguration of the future seat of our democracy crosses a very serious line in my opinion. I will refrain further discussion here as it is not the appropriate forum.
There is a serious discussion to be had on the politicization of dharmic religions. You see the Buddhist Sanghas playing a prominent political role in Sri Lanka, Mynmar, Thailand etc...to the detriment of these countries. Now Hindu mathas and orders are beginning to do the same in India. The Sikh religious order (Akal Takht) is no exception in Punjab. I do not see any good coming out of this , only bad things for both the faith and the nation.
 

mangalavara

सो ऽहम्
Premium Member
:D You are. As I said previously, you had prior acceptance from my side (if you remember). But becoming a brahmin does not get you many votes. They are a minority. Be a Yadav, be a Patel, be a Jat, etc.
:) No, I meant Hindu, Muslim, Christian, etc. In India, it is better to be a Muslim. They vote en-block and generally against Modi.
:) Use your Rupees 6 lakhs to buy cigarettes. Nothing less than 6 Crore will work to contest an election in India.
:) Hindi is for cities. You need to know Marwari, Haranvi, Bhojpuri, Maithil, Avadhi, etc. for villages.
:) That will do. 'Mangalmukhi sada sukhi' (What is started on a Tuesday will always be happy).
:) Thaaaat is wise. Generally one has to be a crook to be in politics, and you do not seem to be one.

The person who had acceptance from your side was Jainarayan. By the way, what exactly is a dharma putra, and what are the duties?

Lol! Using all of that money for cigarettes! Here, I spend a lot on deliveries from cafés and restaurants. The conveniences of Asia!

I’ve heard of Maithil and Avadhi. Lately, I mentioned to some of my students that there are hundreds of languages spoken in India. Their minds were blown.

I like that slogan. I recognized sada because I know ‘Annapurne, Sadapurne.’

Yes, being a crook, and naturally a politician, is not my style.
 

Aupmanyav

Be your own guru
By the way, what exactly is a dharma putra, and what are the duties?
Lately, I mentioned to some of my students that there are hundreds of languages spoken in India. Their minds were blown.
I like that slogan. I recognized sada because I know ‘Annapurne, Sadapurne.’
Yes, being a crook, and naturally a politician, is not my style.
An irrevocable agreement between an elder person and a younger person to act as father and son for religious and spiritual purposes (That does not entitle one to inheritence unless specified). :)
Yeah, as per the People's Linguistic Survey of India, India has the second highest number of languages (780), after Papua New Guinea (840).
'Sadā' means always, all the time, without any exception.
 
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Aupmanyav

Be your own guru
BTW, what was known as the "King's Way" in British times and as "Raj Path" till now after independence, is now 'Kartavya Path' (The Way of Duty) last year. 'Path' is the same as in English, 'Road' (except for pronunciation of 'a'. It is muted, lower, in Hindi/Sanskrit, not 'pAth').
 

River Sea

Active Member
Thanks. Frankly I have same problem with the UK whose head of state, the king (sic) gets annointed by a religious figure. Look at this figure
images

What does it speak of 21st century India when her head of state in a public ceremony of inauguration of Her new parliament does something like this? And this is considered a great PR victory splashed everywhere? Is India, as country subservient to some Brahminical monastic order? I believe our PM has gravely disrespected his position and our Nation's constitution in doing this.
Will get him votes though.. .that is for sure.

How come he has to lie on his stomach?
What would happen if he did some pushups?


1685845129153.png
 

Vinayaka

devotee
Premium Member
How come he has to lie on his stomach?
What would happen if he did some pushups?


View attachment 78184
Full out prostration is common in Hinduism, especially in the South. This is Modi's way of promising to be just. (practicing dharma) The dharma danda, in history, represented how a just king passed the power to his successor. So he is making an oath, and the prostration shows submission to the idea, putting his ego aside.

I see no need to mock the practices of another religion.
 
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