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Can the law grant eternal life?

Betho_br

Member
The question of whether the law can give life is a complex theological issue, and different parts of the Bible seem to present various perspectives on this matter.

1. Ezekiel’s Justice: In the Old Testament, particularly in the book of Ezekiel, there are references to justice associated with obedience to God’s statutes and the observance of His rules. However, it is essential to recognize that this justice is within the context of the Mosaic Law. Within this framework, justice could be achieved through the fulfillment of the commandments and regulations of the Law. While it can bring a form of justice, it does not necessarily grant eternal life.

2. Transformation of Job: Although Job was initially considered a righteous man in the Old Testament, his story also illustrates a deeper spiritual journey. He was proud of his self-righteousness, thinking that his obedience to the law made him blameless. But as the story unfolds, he comes to understand that justice is not limited to legalistic obedience but involves a deeper relationship with God. His understanding evolves, and he recognizes his limitations. The law, as seen in Job’s case, does not grant life in the ultimate sense.

3. Paul’s Perspective: The writings of the Apostle Paul are fundamental to understanding the relationship between justice and the law. He argues that, while there is a form of justice found in the law, it is not sufficient for the salvation and eternal life of all. In passages like Philippians 2:15, 3:6, 3:9, and 1 Thessalonians 3:13, Paul discusses the concept of “blamelessness” in the context of the law. He himself was a zealous Pharisee who believed in the righteousness of the law, as he states in Philippians 3:6. However, he recognizes the limitations of the law and that true justice is found in faith in Christ. In Galatians 2:21, he emphasizes that God’s grace would be nullified if justice were entirely achievable through the law, implying that the law, while sufficient to lead some to a form of justice, is imperfect when it comes to bringing all of humanity to perfect righteousness and eternal life.

4. Jesus’ Encounter with the Rich Young Ruler: The story of the rich young ruler in the Gospels illustrates the idea that mere observance of the law may not be enough for something beyond eternal life. Jesus challenges the rich young ruler to go beyond legalistic observance of the law and to give up his worldly possessions to follow Him and attain, beyond eternal life through obedience to the law’s justice, treasure in heaven. This demonstrates that a higher level of commitment is required than merely following the law to achieve a reward. It suggests that the law, while valuable, cannot, by itself, grant life in its fullest sense.

5. New Covenant: The concept of a New Covenant is also crucial for understanding the shift in perspective. Hebrews 8:7 highlights that the first covenant was not without flaws, leading to the need for a new covenant. The New Covenant, according to Christian theology, is based on faith in the atonement of Christ rather than strict adherence to the Mosaic Law. It signifies a shift away from the idea that the law alone can grant life.



The bronze serpent, mentioned in the Old Testament, specifically in the book of Numbers, chapter 21, verses 4-9, represented a symbol of healing and liberation. The story describes how the Israelites, while in the wilderness, began to complain and murmur against God and Moses due to the difficulties they were facing, including being bitten by venomous snakes.

According to the narrative, God instructed Moses to make a bronze serpent and raise it on a pole. He told the people that if anyone was bitten by a venomous snake, they could look at the bronze serpent and would be healed. The act of looking at the bronze serpent was an act of faith and obedience to God’s instructions, and healing was granted as a result.

The bronze serpent, therefore, was an object of veneration, a symbol of faith and trust in divine intervention for healing and liberation. In the context of John 3:14-15, Jesus was using this story as an analogy to illustrate that, in the same way, He would be “lifted up” (a reference to His crucifixion), and those who looked to Him in faith would be spiritually healed and receive full and eternal life, just as it was done in the time of Moses. Therefore, the bronze serpent in Moses’ story was a symbol of healing and salvation.

Jesus explained about being born again and entering the Kingdom of Heaven to attain Eternal Life. This is not the same path to attaining eternal life through the Law.

I emphasize that the “cherry on top” is the context of Jesus’ encounter with the Rich Young Ruler described in the article. It is true that Jesus also discussed the topic of Eternal Life with another Jew, Nicodemus; however, this encounter was outside the context of the Law. In John 3, Jesus explained about being born again and entering the Kingdom of Heaven to attain Eternal Life. This is not the same path to attaining eternal life through the Law.

Furthermore, the article also mentions the bronze serpent, found in the Old Testament, specifically in the book of Numbers, chapter 21, verses 4-9. It represented a symbol of healing and liberation. The story describes how the Israelites, while in the wilderness, began to complain and murmur against God and Moses due to the hardships they were facing, including being bitten by venomous snakes.

According to the narrative, God instructed Moses to make a bronze serpent and place it on a pole. He told the people that if anyone was bitten by a venomous snake, they could look at the bronze serpent and be healed. Looking at the bronze serpent was an act of faith and obedience to God’s instructions, and as a result, healing was granted.

The bronze serpent, therefore, was an object of veneration, a symbol of faith and trust in divine intervention for healing and liberation. In the context of John 3:14-15, Jesus was using this story as an analogy to illustrate that, in the same way, He would be “lifted up” (a reference to His crucifixion), and those who looked to Him in faith would be spiritually healed and receive full and eternal life, just as was done in the time of Moses. Therefore, the bronze serpent in Moses’ story was a symbol of healing and salvation.

And, behold, one came and said unto him, Good Master, what good thing shall I do, that I may have eternal life? And he said unto him, Why callest thou me good? [there is] none good but one, [that is], God: but if thou wilt enter into life, keep the commandments. Mattews 19:16-17 KJV

In this verse, Jesus is responding to someone who inquires about how to attain eternal life. Jesus indicates that the key to eternal life is the observance of God’s commandments. Therefore, according to this verse, obedience to the commandments is seen as important in the pursuit of eternal life. However, Jesus offered the option of perfection and reward to the rich young man, while the path with Nicodemus is to “be born again” and enter the Kingdom of God to achieve eternal life, which is the main theme of the Gospels. One does not negate the other. While the first deals with eternal life for the circumcised descendants of Abraham, the other deals with making non-circumcised individuals also children of God.

Again, the Pentateuch does not mention “eternal life” at all. The laws are kept as part of a covenant between Israel and God.
The concept of eternal life is found in Daniel 12:2, so it would be appropriate for a zealous follower of the Jewish commandments to inquire of Jesus about how to attain eternal life.



Again, no place is “eternal life” promised. And it’s not all of Abraham’s descendants that are obligated to keep the law as part of a covenant with God. It’s only his descendants via his grandson, Jacob.
It is true that the concept of Eternal Life, initially associated with humanity in Genesis 3:22, appears to have been explicitly attributed to God alone, as seen in Deuteronomy 32:40. However, God’s precepts remain an essential part of human life, as evidenced in Psalm 118:93.

In Genesis 3:22, the passage relates to the moment when humanity ate from the forbidden fruit, and God expressed concern about the possibility of humans also eating from the “tree of life” and living forever. This initial association with Eternal Life was linked to humans, but the continuation of the biblical narrative indicates that this condition was revoked for humanity.

Deuteronomy 32:40, on the other hand, reaffirms God’s absolute control over life and death, emphasizing His sovereignty and authority over eternal destiny. This passage underscores the uniqueness of Eternal Life in relation to God.

However, God’s precepts, as mentioned in Psalm 118:93, continue to serve as spiritual and ethical guidelines that steer people’s lives. While the ability to live eternally may be exclusive to God, obedience to God’s precepts is seen as a path to a life that reflects God’s will and draws individuals spiritually closer to the idea of Eternal Life.

So, while Eternal Life may be exclusive to God, obedience to God’s precepts remains a crucial aspect of people’s lives, connecting them with divine will and guidance.

“Like the dew of Hermon that descends upon the mountains of Zion, for there the Lord has commanded the blessing, life forever.” Psalm 132:3

*** The universal assembly (ἐκκλησία καθ᾽ ὅλης – Acts 9:31) throughout Judea was mostly made up of circumcised individuals.



And I will make thy seed to multiply as the stars of heaven, and will give unto thy seed all these countries; and in thy seed shall all the nations of the earth be blessed; Because that Abraham obeyed my voice, and kept my charge, my commandments, my statutes, and my laws. Genesis 26:4-5 KJV

This is a poem. Are you really inventing theology from a poem?
A song that is said about the depths of the waters of the Lord; my heart did not exalt itself, and my eyes did not lift up, and I did not walk in great and wondrous things beyond me. I did not lay my hand on hidden things, and my soul is tranquil until the precepts of the Law are fulfilled. Thus, Israel will lead to the Lord, from now until eternity.” – Targum Ketuvim Tehillim 131

The phrase “Israel will lead to the Lord, from now until eternity” could be interpreted as a poetic expression that suggests that the people of Israel are in a constant spiritual journey toward God and eternity. It is not a direct quotation, but it reflects the aspiration of the Jewish community to follow divine precepts and find their way toward eternity, aligning with the concept of resurrection and the pursuit of eternal life as discussed in Daniel 12:2.
 

dybmh

דניאל יוסף בן מאיר הירש
Ezekiel’s Justice: In the Old Testament, particularly in the book of Ezekiel, there are references to justice associated with obedience to God’s statutes and the observance of His rules. However, it is essential to recognize that this justice is within the context of the Mosaic Law. Within this framework, justice could be achieved through the fulfillment of the commandments and regulations of the Law. While it can bring a form of justice, it does not necessarily grant eternal life.

Ezekiel 18:21 disagrees with you:

והרשע כי ישוב מכל־חטאתו אשר עשה ושמר את־כל־חקותי ועשה משפט וצדקה חיה יחיה לא ימות׃

But if the wicked will turn from all his sins that he has committed, and keep all my statutes, and do that which is lawful and right, he shall surely live, he shall not die.
 

Betho_br

Member
Ezekiel 18:21 disagrees with you:

והרשע כי ישוב מכל־חטאתו אשר עשה ושמר את־כל־חקותי ועשה משפט וצדקה חיה יחיה לא ימות׃

But if the wicked will turn from all his sins that he has committed, and keep all my statutes, and do that which is lawful and right, he shall surely live, he shall not die.


When I shall say to the righteous, that he shall surely live; if he trust to his own righteousness, and commit iniquity, all his righteousnesses shall not be remembered; but for his iniquity that he hath committed, he shall die for it. (Ezek. 33:13 KJV) Ezek. 18:9, 17, 19, 21; 33:13
 

dybmh

דניאל יוסף בן מאיר הירש
When I shall say to the righteous, that he shall surely live; if he trust to his own righteousness, and commit iniquity, all his righteousnesses shall not be remembered; but for his iniquity that he hath committed, he shall die for it. (Ezek. 33:13 KJV) Ezek. 18:9, 17, 19, 21; 33:13

Correct. It goes both ways. But the law DOES grant eternal life.
 

Betho_br

Member
Yes, you are correct. What leaves me perplexed is that the Jesus mentioned in the Gospel of Matthew, which was directed towards the Jews, also affirmed this about the Law. This gives rise to many philosophical and historical questions regarding this matter.
 

dybmh

דניאל יוסף בן מאיר הירש
Yes, you are correct. What leaves me perplexed is that the Jesus mentioned in the Gospel of Matthew, which was directed towards the Jews, also affirmed this about the Law. This gives rise to many philosophical and historical questions regarding this matter.

I just reviewed some of what you wrote. If you would like to discuss it more throughly, maybe quote a specific passage and we can go though it together? I'm not a Christian, but, sometimes an outsider's perspective is good. Since Jesus was Jewish it might be good to get a Jewish persepective. You can always ignore it if feels wrong for some reason.
 

Betho_br

Member
And seeing the multitudes, he went up into a mountain: and when he was set, his disciples came unto him: And he opened his mouth, and taught them, saying, (Matt. 5:1-2 KJV)
...
And it came to pass, when Jesus had ended these sayings, the people were astonished at his doctrine: (Mat. 7:28 KJV)

The "Sermon on the Mount" is one of Jesus's most fundamental teachings and is central to his message and doctrine. It addresses essential ethical and moral principles for the Christian faith, such as humility, justice, love for others, prayer, and seeking the Kingdom of God, as well as issues like anger, adultery, oaths, and charity. Its relevance lies in guiding how to live a virtuous life centered on God and oriented towards the well-being of others, with universal and timeless applications.

While many ethical principles were already present in Jewish tradition, Jesus reinterpreted them, challenging legalistic interpretations of the law. He delivered these teachings to an audience that included people considered "cursed" for not fully understanding Jewish law, highlighting the accessibility of his message. This contrasted with the view of some Jewish religious leaders expressed in John 7:49, who looked down upon those unfamiliar with the law. Jesus offered hope and spiritual guidance to all people, regardless of their social status or legal knowledge, emphasizing the universality and timelessness of his teachings.

Jesus uses the word "reward" in the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5:12, 46; 6:1-2, 5, 16) and in other passages such as Matthew 10:41-42 and 20:8. This term is not as commonly used in the other Gospels. In Matthew 19, Jesus instructs a zealous young Jewish man well-versed in the law that, in addition to eternal life achieved through law observance, selling one's possessions and giving to the poor leads to treasure in heaven. Clearly, this is meant metaphorically to prevent the young man from relying solely on his righteousness for assurance of eternal life.

The focus is on this "reward" as the ultimate goal, which transcends mere law observance, as emphasized by Jesus during his time. It serves to highlight that living a life beyond mere legal compliance and striving for this heavenly "reward" is the core of his teachings.

How do you interpret my perspective?
 

1213

Well-Known Member
The question of whether the law can give life is a complex theological issue, and different parts of the Bible seem to present various perspectives on this matter.
I don't think they really give a different perspective. Law tells what is wrong and what one would deserve for braking it. This is why the law can only take life, not give it. If one lives by the law, he keeps his life that he already has.
 

Betho_br

Member
I don't think they really give a different perspective. Law tells what is wrong and what one would deserve for braking it. This is why the law can only take life, not give it. If one lives by the law, he keeps his life that he already has.
I understand your assertion, and it is a logical path. However, I have some questions. I don't fully trust the translations of Paul's writings, as in many cases, as we have seen, there are distortions of his ideas. I also have a certain insecurity in adopting a minimalist approach to the law, given my non-Jewish understanding.
 

dybmh

דניאל יוסף בן מאיר הירש
The focus is on this "reward" as the ultimate goal, which transcends mere law observance, as emphasized by Jesus during his time. It serves to highlight that living a life beyond mere legal compliance and striving for this heavenly "reward" is the core of his teachings.

How do you interpret my perspective?

Yes, I think so. Here is what I think. I think that the sermon on the mount intends to reintroduce observances, aspects, of the law which are either not obvious, are easily overlooked, or perhaps have been forgotten.

However, I do not think that the ministry of the "Kingdom of God" is a heavenly reward. But, I am not a scholar of the Gospels. This is just my Jewish perspective having read the Gospels only 2 or 3 times.

What leaves me perplexed....

The "reward" could be HaOlam Haba, the future material world, heaven on earth as prophecied, which Jesus describes terms of the "Kingdom of God". In this future world, heaven on earth, there is prophecied eternal life, literally in physical bodies, on earth. What Ezekiel 18 is talking about could be spiritual life and death of the soul.

I find this happens in Chrstianity. An assumption is made about two or more concepts being the same thing, when they are actually different if considered in their Jewish context.
 

Betho_br

Member
Yes, I think so. Here is what I think. I think that the sermon on the mount intends to reintroduce observances, aspects, of the law which are either not obvious, are easily overlooked, or perhaps have been forgotten.

However, I do not think that the ministry of the "Kingdom of God" is a heavenly reward. But, I am not a scholar of the Gospels. This is just my Jewish perspective having read the Gospels only 2 or 3 times.



The "reward" could be HaOlam Haba, the future material world, heaven on earth as prophecied, which Jesus describes terms of the "Kingdom of God". In this future world, heaven on earth, there is prophecied eternal life, literally in physical bodies, on earth. What Ezekiel 18 is talking about could be spiritual life and death of the soul.

I find this happens in Chrstianity. An assumption is made about two or more concepts being the same thing, when they are actually different if considered in their Jewish context.
Thank you. I'll study this, and it might take me a little while to reply.
 

dybmh

דניאל יוסף בן מאיר הירש
Thank you. I'll study this, and it might take me a little while to reply.

One thing that comes to mind is the rising of the dead from the graves at the end of Matthew. This is one of the signs of the arrival of HaOlam Haba, "The World to Come".
 

Betho_br

Member
1) Is the future state, life after death, or the world to come all equivalent in the general Jewish perspective?

2) Can the righteous who are rewarded with closeness to God be reincarnated souls, some of whom passed through purgatory and evolved into a human like Adam before the fall?

3) It's clear that there are some aspects of this text from Matthew 27 regarding the saints about which the Early Church Fathers were uncertain. For example, there's the question of whether the saints were resurrected before or after Jesus, and whether it was a resurrection to a mortal body or a permanent resurrection to an immortal body. Nevertheless, there is no reason to seriously doubt that all the surveyed Fathers accepted the historicity of this account.

הַקְּבָרִים נִפְתְּחוּ וְרַבִּים מִיְּשֵׁינֵי אַדְמַת עָפָר קָמוּ Shem Tob's Hebrew Gospel of Matthew 27:52
"The graves were opened, and many of those who slept in the dust of the earth arose."

“Therefore prophesy and say to them, ‘Thus says the Lord GOD, “Behold, I will open your graves and cause you to come up out of your graves, My people; and I will bring you into the land of Israel. Then you will know that I am the LORD, when I have opened your graves and caused you to come up out of your graves, My people. I will put My Spirit within you and you will come to life, and I will place you on your own land. Then you will know that I, the LORD, have spoken and done it,” declares the LORD.’” Ezekiel 37:12-14


Teshuvot HaRadbaz Volume 3 - Teshuva 1069


שאלת ממני ידיד נפשי על זמן התחייה לפי שקבלת מאבותיך שהוא סמוך לאלף השביעי עם הכנסת שבת העולם שכלו מנוחה וק"ל א"כ הצדיקים וחסידי עליון אשר מתו על קדושת שמו בגלות לא יראו בטובתן של ישראל ולא ישמחו בשמחתן:


תשובה כל ימי הייתי מצטער על דבר זה עד שראיתי דברי הריטב"א ז"ל בשם רבותיו נ"נ דאיכא תרי תחיות אחת פרטית לצדיקים שמתו בגלות והיא סמוכה לביאת המשיח ויזכו לכל ימות המשיח בגוף ונפש ויראו בטובתן של ישראל ובבנין הבית וישמחו בשמחת חלף עבודתם וכו' וא' כללית והיא סמוכה להכנסת שבת כאשר קבלתי והוא נקרא עולם התחייה ועליה נאמר ורבים מישיני אדמת עפר יקיצו וכו':


שוב ראיתי שזה מוסכם דשתי תחיות יש ועל התחייה הראשונה נאמר בנבואת זכריה בן ברכיהו עוד ישבו זקנים וזקנות בשערי ירושלים וילפינן בג"ש דכתיב הכא וילכו על משענותם ובאלישע שהחיה את המת כתיב משענת וילפינן משענת ממשענת מה התם תחיית המתים אף הכא תחיית המתים. והכי איתא בפסח שני ומייתי לה בתוספות סוף מכות ולמדו מכאן שנבואה זו היא לעתיד אחר הגאולה ומדקאמר קרא עוד ישבו זקנים וזקנות וכו' מרוב ימים משמע שעל התחייה הראשונה הוא מדבר דאלו על האחרונה אין שם לא זקנה ולא רוב ימים כי מיד יכנס השבת שהוא מנוחה לחי העולמים ועולם שכולו שבת וזכור תמיד ענין זה כי היא נחמה גדולה לסובלי צרות הגלות ועול השעבוד כי עדיין תראה עיניהם ציון נוה שאנן וארמון על משפטו ועבודת הקדש על מתכונתה במהרה בימינו אמן. והנראה לע"ד כתבתי:


1. There are two types of resurrection:
- The first resurrection is specific to the righteous who died in exile (galut). These righteous individuals will be resurrected close to the arrival of the Messiah (Mashiach) and will experience the Messianic era in both body and soul. They will witness the goodness of Israel and the rebuilding of the Temple, finding joy in the new era following their past suffering.

- The second resurrection is more general and is associated with the coming of the Sabbath (Shabbat). It is referred to as "Olam Ha-Techiyah," or the "World of Resurrection." It is described as a time when "many of those who sleep in the dust of the earth will arise," as mentioned in Daniel 12:2. This is a broader resurrection encompassing a larger segment of the population.

2. The author finds support for the first resurrection in the book of Zechariah, where it is prophesied that old men and women will once again sit in the gates of Jerusalem. This is interpreted as a reference to the first resurrection, indicating that the righteous who died in exile will experience this event before the general resurrection associated with the coming of the Sabbath.

The text also alludes to the idea that the "Olam Ha-Techiyah" or the World of Resurrection represents a time of great comfort for those who have suffered during the exile and the period of servitude. It is a time when the glory of God will be revealed, and the righteous will experience spiritual joy and redemption.

This passage reflects one interpretation within Jewish eschatology and resurrection beliefs, which can vary among different Jewish traditions and scholars. The concept of multiple resurrections and their timing is a subject of debate and interpretation within Jewish theology.

It is clear that Matthew 27:52 is correlated with Ezekiel 37:12-14, but what is their correlation with Teshuva 1069, 3 Volume - Teshuvot HaRadbaz?
 
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dybmh

דניאל יוסף בן מאיר הירש
1) Is the future state, life after death, or the world to come all equivalent in the general Jewish perspective?

There are different theories about what HaOlam will look like. On one end of the spectrum Jewish thought is that it will be a truly miraculous world of perfection. On the other end of the spectrum, Jewish thought is that it will be no different except that the Jewish people will be free to live a Jewish life unhindered by any of the other nations, and all of the prophecies are just exaggerated or adjusted in a way so that a less spiritual more "rational" Jewish person can read the prophecy without automatically rejecting it. Between those two extremes is a technicolor rainbow of possibilities.

That said, there is a "life" of sorts in the heavenly realms prior to HaOlam Haba. The righteous have their own special place in the heavenly realm. Those who were wicked still have a place in heaven but they go through a purgatory for a max of 11 months. And most Jewish people believe that reincarnation is possible per God's command prior to HaOlam Haba for various reasons. They will live another lifetime, or two, or more. Some of the hyper-rationalists deny this, naturally.

Then, when HaOlam Haba arrives, there will be a ressurrection.

2) Can the righteous who are rewarded with closeness to God be reincarnated souls, some of whom passed through purgatory and evolved into a human like Adam before the fall?

They would be more than Adam before the fall. They know good and evil and have chosen to do good. Their reward would be great. Although there would not be a "human form". That only exists in the material world, the world of making and doing.

3) It's clear that there are some aspects of this text from Matthew 27

They were Jews... :)

It is clear that Matthew 27:52 is correlated with Ezekiel 37:12-14, but what is their correlation with Teshuva 1069, 3 Volume - Teshuvot HaRadbaz?

There's several possibilities, right? You've probably considered these already?
  1. The author of Matthew didn't know about the prophecy in Zecharia
  2. The author of Matthew thought that the first ressurection happened right away and the second one would happen later
  3. The author of Matthew thought that the common Jewish person didn't earn ressurection
  4. The author of Matthew omitted the 2nd ressurection intentionally because it diminshes the necessity to believe in Christ and convert to Christianity
There could be others too.
 

Betho_br

Member
The way things are is often not as people imagine. I'll study this, and it might take longer than the other answer.
 

IndigoChild5559

Loving God and my neighbor as myself.
@Betho_br

It is a common misconception that Christians have of Jews that Judaism teaches being saved from your sins like Christianity does, but that this salvation is achieved a different way, via keeping the Law. THIS IS NOT THE CASE.

When salvation is mentioned in the Tanakh (OT) it is referring to very literal, very earthly salvation, such as David being saved from his enemies. It does not refer to any salvation from sins. Although the afterlife is mentioned, it is not given as the reason we should obey God. We obey God simply because he is God and worthy of our obedience, and because keeping the Law gives us a higher quality life and draws us closer to God.
 

Wandering Monk

Well-Known Member
@Betho_br

It is a common misconception that Christians have of Jews that Judaism teaches being saved from your sins like Christianity does, but that this salvation is achieved a different way, via keeping the Law.
Anyone who believes that is completely ignorant. They need to hear the Al Chet recited during the Yom Kippur service.
 

Betho_br

Member
@Betho_br

It is a common misconception that Christians have of Jews that Judaism teaches being saved from your sins like Christianity does, but that this salvation is achieved a different way, via keeping the Law. THIS IS NOT THE CASE.

When salvation is mentioned in the Tanakh (OT) it is referring to very literal, very earthly salvation, such as David being saved from his enemies. It does not refer to any salvation from sins. Although the afterlife is mentioned, it is not given as the reason we should obey God. We obey God simply because he is God and worthy of our obedience, and because keeping the Law gives us a higher quality life and draws us closer to God.

"I admit that I'm feeling a bit confused at this stage of the discussion. Nevertheless, upon closely examining your post, I've only now come to realize that the rich young Jewish man introduces the concept of 'eternal life,' and Jesus responds with just 'life.' In Greek, there's a substantial difference, even though both Jesus and the young man use the word 'Zoe' for life, signifying a rich and abundant existence."
 

Betho_br

Member
Anyone who believes that is completely ignorant. They need to hear the Al Chet recited during the Yom Kippur service.
I had access to an old sermon by a Jewish rabbi titled "Doctrine of Grace" or "Chesed" (grace, mercy, unconditional love of God) and repentance (Teshuvá). As a Christian, I wonder what the doctrine of grace means in Judaism...
 

IndigoChild5559

Loving God and my neighbor as myself.
"I admit that I'm feeling a bit confused at this stage of the discussion. Nevertheless, upon closely examining your post, I've only now come to realize that the rich young Jewish man introduces the concept of 'eternal life,' and Jesus responds with just 'life.' In Greek, there's a substantial difference, even though both Jesus and the young man use the word 'Zoe' for life, signifying a rich and abundant existence."
The stories about Jesus, such as the parable of the rich man and Lazarus, are in the Christian scriptures. They have nothing to do with Judaism.
 
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