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Would anyone help answer some questions for a school assignment?

VoidCat

Pronouns: he/they/it/neopronouns
@learningaboutreligion off topic but this is advice I'd give to any inspiring nurse
be sure regarding nursing to read up on the disabled community things like neurodiversity and the disability rights movement. Because a lot of nurses don't always understand disabled people, or the systematic oppressions disabled folk like myself face. I know for instance maybe your college classes have been better then mine since I'm a teacher not a nurse, the things they say regarding autism is often outdated or flat out wrong. There's a saying I heard in the disabled community... when it comes to disability, the medical community lags behind the knowledge of the academic field and the academic field lags behind the lived experiences of the disabled community. The reason is that it takes time for the medical community to learn the information that the academics have learned through recent studies and the academics are just now getting information from the disabled who have lived these experiences.

more on topic
I'm actually looking into information about disability and how it's viewed in multiple religions. But I can't talk much on it yet because I'm still learning on the topic. Otherwise I would have included bits in my answers I posted earlier. So these answers I gave could change as I learn new information
 

The Hammer

[REDACTED]
Premium Member
Hi there! I have a school assignment that involves asking someone certain questions regarding their religion. I would really appreciate it if someone would take some time to answer these questions. Thank you!

1. What religious tradition do you follow?
Druidry aka Paganism
2. Were you part of the same tradition growing up? If not, which religion did you identify with when you were young, and why do you no longer follow it?
No, I was raised Christian/Catholic. I didn't like the guilt and shame focus of Catholicism.

3. What is your definition or understanding of God or the divine?
Multifaceted and Polytheistic
4. Which text(s) are the scriptures for your religious group?
Comparative mythology.
5. Do you have a spiritual leader? If so, please describe what that person does for you and your group.
I am my own spiritual leader, ie no need for a spiritual intermediary between me and the Gods. But the church I am a part of has dedicated clergy for things like pastoral counseling services.

6. Where and when do you worship or participate in religious services? Is that the only place where you worship?
I worship at home more often then not. I have an Altar in my office and perform 8 rituals a year for the Wheel of the Year at a minimum.
7. How do your religious beliefs and preferences impact your lifestyle choices when it comes to health and wellness?
My body my temple. I'm going to treat it as such, including both taking care of it and decorating. Holistic wellness is important but modern medicine is not eschewed.

8. How would your religious beliefs and preferences affect the provision of medical services if you were ill or injured?
I don't really think it would. I like a place to hang a protective amulet bedside, and/or maybe a small altar with symbols I could set bedside.

9. What is the most important part of your religion to you?
Plurality and inclusive community.

10. Have you ever questioned your faith?
All the time. I think that's normal. We should always be updating and revising our views as circumstances and information change.

11. What are your beliefs on the after life?

We live on as Spirits and Ancestors for those that need our assistance and guidance.
 

Quintessence

Consults with Trees
Staff member
Premium Member
1. What religious tradition do you follow?

It's complicated, but in simple terms I'm a contemporary Pagan, specifically a Druid, and have an affiliation with the Order of Bards, Ovates, and Druids (OBOD). I say it's complicated because it is important to understand Paganism isn't an organized or dogmatic religious traditionm so in effect, my religious tradition is simply mine.

2. Were you part of the same tradition growing up? If not, which religion did you identify with when you were young, and why do you no longer follow it?

While second generation (and a few third) Pagans are actually a thing these days, I am not among them. I did not identify at all with the religion my parents tried to raise me as. So much so that I more or less threw enough tantrums that they quit forcing it on me. Being called "religious" was deeply insulting to me, so I was more or less one of those anti-religion, anti-theist idiots for... an embarrassingly long time, to be honest even if culture was far more to blame for that than I was.

3. What is your definition or understanding of God or the divine?

Gods are that which peoples and cultures deem worthy of worship. It's more like a title or appellation, indicating a particular relationship of respect and honor and gratitude between the humans and something other-than-human. From there, the specifics vary tremendously from culture to culture and literally everything has been deified at some point. For me, I put a strong focus on gods-as-nature/reality/universe and do not believe in a distinction between gods and reality in general (aka, everything is sacred, everything is divine, everything is worthy of worship).

4. Which text(s) are the scriptures for your religious group?

Paganism doesn't have scriptures, neither does Druidry, neither does my own personal tradition. The Order of Bards, Ovates, and Druids specifically encourages taking inspiration from anything and everything. In that sense, everything is "scripture" in a way.

5. Do you have a spiritual leader? If so, please describe what that person does for you and your group.

Kind of, sort of, not really? The Chosen Chief of OBOD is kind of just that girl who encourages you to follow your muse, connects you up with others to support you in the beauty you want to bring to the world, and engages in the bureaucratic management that comes with having some semblance of organization. Eimear is cool people, and so was Philip before her. Just someone you'd just want to have a cuppa tea and a chat with.

6. Where and when do you worship or participate in religious services? Is that the only place where you worship?

While there are various Seed Groups and larger Gatherings for the Order, I've never been. It's the downside of being a religious minority. I practice alone, which suits me fine though. I have a room in my home dedicated for practice and also often practice outside and wherever. A lot of worship is just everyday mindfulness when going about the day-to-day.

7. How do your religious beliefs and preferences impact your lifestyle choices when it comes to health and wellness?

So... it should surprise no one that Druids tend to be supporters of environmentalism. The health and wellness of our beautiful blue-green orb is of prime importance. That encompasses a lot of territory, from supporting locally-grown produce to giving the finger to the consumeristic nature of American culture by just not participating in it much.

8. How would your religious beliefs and preferences affect the provision of medical services if you were ill or injured?

It generally doesn't. That said, I am very much not a fan of the broken and predatory medical industry in my country or its failure to practice proper preventative and holistic (non-invasive) care. But this is less a medical service problem than a systemic societal issue.

9. What is the most important part of your religion to you?

I dunno about "most" important, but part of accepting there are forces out there greater than yourself (aka, higher powers or gods) means a perpetual attitude of humility and gratitude. The universe doesn't revolve around humans, and it should not be expected to.

10. Have you ever questioned your faith?

My religion is more of a practice than a "faith" so kind of sort of not really? Or rather, religion done proper is a living experience that changes as you and your life does. That's... that's just normal? Especially for place-based, nature-based religion. If I relocated, a lot of my traditions would have to change because of living in a different environment. It's just how it works.

11. What are your beliefs on the after life?

I have no use for the concept. It's obvious that existence is a continuity. After life is... more life. And when you understand that neither time nor space are as simple and absolute as is taught in modern, domesticated human cultures then couple that with a non-anthropocentric understanding of reality in general? Heh.
 

osgart

Nothing my eye, Something for sure
Hi there! I have a school assignment that involves asking someone certain questions regarding their religion. I would really appreciate it if someone would take some time to answer these questions. Thank you!

1. What religious tradition do you follow?
I made my own religious path
2. Were you part of the same tradition growing up? If not, which religion did you identify with when you were young, and why do you no longer follow it?
Christianity both Catholic and independent Baptist kept intruding on my life
3. What is your definition or understanding of God or the divine?
No God exists. Divinity is perfect infallible character.
4. Which text(s) are the scriptures for your religious group?
It's all in pencil
5. Do you have a spiritual leader? If so, please describe what that person does for you and your group.
No such for me.
6. Where and when do you worship or participate in religious services? Is that the only place where you worship?
I worship nothing.
7. How do your religious beliefs and preferences impact your lifestyle choices when it comes to health and wellness?
I try to follow well established guidelines and facts. Nothing impedes my medical care.
8. How would your religious beliefs and preferences affect the provision of medical services if you were ill or injured?
Not at all influenced to ignore serious medical care.
9. What is the most important part of your religion to you?
The 100 virtues.
10. Have you ever questioned your faith?
Yes I do. It's all in pencil.
11. What are your beliefs on the after life?
There must be an unconditioned eternal foundational existence of intelligence and feeling. This reality is a veil. Once the body is shed the spirit roams free. Our lives are a mere drop in the wild ocean of eternal existence. We are beyond space, time, matter and energy. The Source of life is always life. True life defies explanation. Existence here is like being marooned on an island. Once death sets us free we are no longer bound to the physical. Existence creates us to learn itself. Cosmic purpose is to discover and find abode. Ideal forms of all things exist; Mathematics, Virtues, Intelligence, Wisdom are no accident. They are the powers of existence. We are born of infinite possibilities.
 

Twilight Hue

Twilight, not bright nor dark, good nor bad.
It's common to cover religion in all all sectors of healthcare, as well as social work. Anything that deals with assisting the needs of a religiously diverse public.

It allows them to keep an informed practice with their patients moral and lifestyle views in mind.
Curious since my entire open heart surgery, I was never approached about my religion.

I'm guessing it's more for people who have conflicts involving their religious beliefs and healthcare procedures and the like.
 

The Hammer

[REDACTED]
Premium Member
Curious since my entire open heart surgery, I was never approached about my religion.

I'm guessing it's more for people who have conflicts involving their religious beliefs and healthcare procedures and the like.

If they needed to do end of life care or anything that involves a blood transfusion, organ transplant etc. they would have asked what you were ok with. That's part of it. But it's a lot more faceted.

 
@learningaboutreligion off topic but this is advice I'd give to any inspiring nurse
be sure regarding nursing to read up on the disabled community things like neurodiversity and the disability rights movement. Because a lot of nurses don't always understand disabled people, or the systematic oppressions disabled folk like myself face. I know for instance maybe your college classes have been better then mine since I'm a teacher not a nurse, the things they say regarding autism is often outdated or flat out wrong. There's a saying I heard in the disabled community... when it comes to disability, the medical community lags behind the knowledge of the academic field and the academic field lags behind the lived experiences of the disabled community. The reason is that it takes time for the medical community to learn the information that the academics have learned through recent studies and the academics are just now getting information from the disabled who have lived these experiences.

more on topic
I'm actually looking into information about disability and how it's viewed in multiple religions. But I can't talk much on it yet because I'm still learning on the topic. Otherwise I would have included bits in my answers I posted earlier. So these answers I gave could change as I learn new information
I agree, it is a topic that is not discussed enough, and it would be interesting to know about how different religious groups view people with disabilities. I do hope to learn more about it. Are there any key points, as a nurse, I should know when caring for those that are disabled/ neurodiverse?
 

VoidCat

Pronouns: he/they/it/neopronouns
I agree, it is a topic that is not discussed enough, and it would be interesting to know about how different religious groups view people with disabilities. I do hope to learn more about it. Are there any key points, as a nurse, I should know when caring for those that are disabled/ neurodiverse?
Don't dismiss their experiences. They do often know them as they live them. Listen to them and keep in mind pain is subjective. If you in chronic pain for example you may be at an 8 all the time so they may not seem to be in as much pain as they are in. A lot of doctors/nurses dismiss disabled folks concerns because they the patient. But if you lived with a disability for years or your whole life you bound to know things your doctor or nurse doesn't and your body is unique to you so you may know more about how your body reacts to certain things then the medical professionals think you do. This dont mean they know everything after all you did go to med school they may not have. But just that they may know things you don't. Be willing to admit if you don't know something or just learnt something. Also disability is viewed through many models I'd look at the differences betweem the medical and social model.
 
Don't dismiss their experiences. They do often know them as they live them. Listen to them and keep in mind pain is subjective. If you in chronic pain for example you may be at an 8 all the time so they may not seem to be in as much pain as they are in. A lot of doctors/nurses dismiss disabled folks concerns because they the patient. But if you lived with a disability for years or your whole life you bound to know things your doctor or nurse doesn't and your body is unique to you so you may know more about how your body reacts to certain things then the medical professionals think you do. This dont mean they know everything after all you did go to med school they may not have. But just that they may know things you don't. Be willing to admit if you don't know something or just learnt something. Also disability is viewed through many models I'd look at the differences betweem the medical and social model.
Thank you so much for these insights and suggestions. I will do my best to use them going forward.
 

crossfire

LHP Mercuræn Feminist Heretic Bully ☿
Premium Member
Hi there! I have a school assignment that involves asking someone certain questions regarding their religion. I would really appreciate it if someone would take some time to answer these questions. Thank you!

1. What religious tradition do you follow?
I am a Mahayana Buddhist, ordained Pastafarian, and Luciferian.
2. Were you part of the same tradition growing up? If not, which religion did you identify with when you were young, and why do you no longer follow it?
The only "religion" I was raised in was "children shall be brought up to have their own minds." I still agree with this.
3. What is your definition or understanding of God or the divine?
Buddhism: the Four Sublime States:
  1. Metta--benevolent loving-kindness
  2. Karuna--compassion (skillful action)
  3. Mudita--empathetic joy
  4. Upekkha--equanimity--even mindedness, sanity

4. Which text(s) are the scriptures for your religious group?
The Pali Tipitaka and various Zen texts such as the Hsin Hsin Ming

Pastafarianism: The Eight I'd Really Rather You Didn'ts

5. Do you have a spiritual leader? If so, please describe what that person does for you and your group.
Not at this time.
6. Where and when do you worship or participate in religious services? Is that the only place where you worship?
I don't worship.
7. How do your religious beliefs and preferences impact your lifestyle choices when it comes to health and wellness?
Taking care of oneself is important in Buddhism.
8. How would your religious beliefs and preferences affect the provision of medical services if you were ill or injured?
I would go to a skilled doctor or healer.
9. What is the most important part of your religion to you?
Becoming a better person.
10. Have you ever questioned your faith?
Always.
11. What are your beliefs on the after life?
Don't know any particulars.
 
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