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Would anyone help answer some questions for a school assignment?

UPDATE: Thanks to all the great and diverse discussions, I no longer need any more responses. Thanks to everyone!

Hi there! I have a school assignment that involves asking someone certain questions regarding their religion. I would really appreciate it if someone would take some time to answer these questions. Thank you!

1. What religious tradition do you follow?
2. Were you part of the same tradition growing up? If not, which religion did you identify with when you were young, and why do you no longer follow it?
3. What is your definition or understanding of God or the divine?
4. Which text(s) are the scriptures for your religious group?
5. Do you have a spiritual leader? If so, please describe what that person does for you and your group.
6. Where and when do you worship or participate in religious services? Is that the only place where you worship?
7. How do your religious beliefs and preferences impact your lifestyle choices when it comes to health and wellness?
8. How would your religious beliefs and preferences affect the provision of medical services if you were ill or injured?
9. What is the most important part of your religion to you?
10. Have you ever questioned your faith?
11. What are your beliefs on the after life?
 
Last edited:

SalixIncendium

अहं ब्रह्मास्मि
Staff member
Premium Member
  1. Hinduism - Advaita Vedanta school of philosophy.
  2. No. Roman Catholic. It did not align with my worldview.
  3. I have no personal gods. Nirguna Brahman is the highest principle, the Ultimate reality, that which upon everything appears. It is without qualities or attributes.
  4. There are many in Hinduism. The Upanishads are the principal texts for my flavor of the religion.
  5. No. However, many in Hinduism have a guru.
  6. I neither worship nor attend services. There are three primary yogas in Hinduism: Bhakti - the path of devotion/worship, Karma - the path of action, and Jnana - the path of knowledge. I am a jnana yogi.
  7. My lifestyle choices with regard to health and wellness aren't impacted by my religion. I'm a vegetarian, but this is more for ethical reasons than health related ones.
  8. No impact.
  9. Ahimsa - non-violence - is probably at the top of the list.
  10. There is nothing to question if there is nothing to have faith in.
  11. One remains in samsara (they cycle of rebirths) until one achieves moksha (liberation from samsara by way of Self-realization).
 

Twilight Hue

Twilight, not bright nor dark, good nor bad.
Hi there! I have a school assignment that involves asking someone certain questions regarding their religion. I would really appreciate it if someone would take some time to answer these questions. Thank you!

1. What religious tradition do you follow?
2. Were you part of the same tradition growing up? If not, which religion did you identify with when you were young, and why do you no longer follow it?
3. What is your definition or understanding of God or the divine?
4. Which text(s) are the scriptures for your religious group?
5. Do you have a spiritual leader? If so, please describe what that person does for you and your group.
6. Where and when do you worship or participate in religious services? Is that the only place where you worship?
7. How do your religious beliefs and preferences impact your lifestyle choices when it comes to health and wellness?
8. How would your religious beliefs and preferences affect the provision of medical services if you were ill or injured?
9. What is the most important part of your religion to you?
10. Have you ever questioned your faith?
11. What are your beliefs on the after life?
What kind of school is it?
 
  1. Hinduism - Advaita Vedanta school of philosophy.
  2. No. Roman Catholic. It did not align with my worldview.
  3. I have no personal gods. Nirguna Brahman is the highest principle, the Ultimate reality, that which upon everything appears. It is without qualities or attributes.
  4. There are many in Hinduism. The Upanishads are the principal texts for my flavor of the religion.
  5. No. However, many in Hinduism have a guru.
  6. I neither worship nor attend services. There are three primary yogas in Hinduism: Bhakti - the path of devotion/worship, Karma - the path of action, and Jnana - the path of knowledge. I am a jnana yogi.
  7. My lifestyle choices with regard to health and wellness aren't impacted by my religion. I'm a vegetarian, but this is more for ethical reasons than health related ones.
  8. No impact.
  9. Ahimsa - non-violence - is probably at the top of the list.
  10. There is nothing to question if there is nothing to have faith in.
  11. One remains in samsara (they cycle of rebirths) until one achieves moksha (liberation from samsara by way of Self-realization).
Thank you so much for your answers! We learned about Hinduism last week, so this is very helpful.
 
I see, I'm guessing a Christian healthcare organization then.

I just find religious topics unsual for school unless its related to the organizations mission statement
It is not a religious university. I believe it is now standard to take a world religions class for a BSN degree. The focus is to learn about different religions and the nursing implications, i.e. how to better care for patients by acknowledging and honoring their beliefs.
 

VoidCat

Pronouns: he/they/it/neopronouns
1. What religious tradition do you follow?
I'm syncretic. I mix different belief systems. I mix different left handed paths such as theistic luciferianism and theistic satanism and demonolatry. I also follow paganism. I worship 4 gods- Samael(Lucifer), Lilith, Bastet, and Loki. Bastet is my patron deity. I also am planning on hiring a geneologist as my mom claims to be native american. If it turns out this is true then I'll be looking into the Lakota Sioux, and seeing if I can learn more about their spiritual beliefs.
2. Were you part of the same tradition growing up? If not, which religion did you identify with when you were young, and why do you no longer follow it?
no. I first was a christian. Baptist. I left it as it was suffocating. I could not agree with the views regarding sin. And another deity called me.

3. What is your definition or understanding of God or the divine?
The Divine is in everything. There is sacredness in the mundane and in the everyday. The divine lies within and outside of you. There are many gods. I'm an animist and a polytheist with pantheistic leanings.
4. Which text(s) are the scriptures for your religious group?
All books are sacred. Knowledge is sacred. So all books are Divine and Holy. Even if the only thing you learn is you disagree with everything in said book.
5. Do you have a spiritual leader? If so, please describe what that person does for you and your group.
no. I lead myself.
6. Where and when do you worship or participate in religious services? Is that the only place where you worship?
My church is the earth itself. I honor where i need to.
7. How do your religious beliefs and preferences impact your lifestyle choices when it comes to health and wellness?
I honor Bastet- a goddess of health. Thus I must take care of myself. So I'm big on introspection, and doing what is needed to improve myself and I try to keep on top of my health. For example if I don't feel like eating tho I know I must I will eat as an offering to Bastet.
8. How would your religious beliefs and preferences affect the provision of medical services if you were ill or injured?
Hmmm...I don't think it'd be affected much. Altho I'm big on questioning and on seeking knowledge due to worshiping Samael. And I also am big on autonomy being a follower of a left handed path. So I'll insist on being informed of said services to make an appropriate decision regarding my health.
9. What is the most important part of your religion to you?
Being myself and embracing balance and fluidity
(that is being able to adapt).
10. Have you ever questioned your faith?
Yes. Always question everything.
11. What are your beliefs on the after life?
I believe we cannot know what happens after death. I may have theories but that's just that. Instead lets focus on the here and now and make as much of a positive impact now and here.
 

sun rise

The world is on fire
Premium Member
1. What religious tradition do you follow?
I don't follow a religions tradition. Probably classify me as "spiritual but not religious". I accept Meher Baba as the latest incarnation of the eternal Avatar. I am a member of Sufism Reoriented.
2. Were you part of the same tradition growing up? If not, which religion did you identify with when you were young, and why do you no longer follow it?
My parents were atheist Jews. I had a number of experiences that caused me to change.
3. What is your definition or understanding of God or the divine?
"God alone is real".

4. Which text(s) are the scriptures for your religious group?
We have no "scriptures". We read books by and about Meher Baba. Depending on our interests, we read and study books of all the religious traditions and the works of those who have attained such as Hafiz, Rumi, Ramakrishna Paramhamsa, Ramana Maharshi, St. Francis of Assisi and others.
5. Do you have a spiritual leader? If so, please describe what that person does for you and your group.
Rather than try to reproduce what our web site says, I refer you to LINEAGE | Sufism Reoriented

6. Where and when do you worship or participate in religious services? Is that the only place where you worship?
We don't have "worship"/religious services. We do have a meditation practice of remembering God. But to me, the key part of our "worship" is this: “To love God in the most practical way is to love our fellow beings. If we feel for others in the same way as we feel for our own dear ones, we love God.”
7. How do your religious beliefs and preferences impact your lifestyle choices when it comes to health and wellness?
There's nothing special. People follow their own inclinations when it comes to staying healthy but generally people tend to eat healthy food. "What comes out of the mouth is much more important than what goes into it"
8. How would your religious beliefs and preferences affect the provision of medical services if you were ill or injured?
Again there is nothing special. I see doctors when I have significant symptoms and also get acupuncture and see a chiropractor.
9. What is the most important part of your religion to you?
If I had to pick one thing it would be love.
10. Have you ever questioned your faith?
When I was seeking I questioned everything. I was trained as a chemist and then a psychologist. So I was used to asking questions and needing good answers.
11. What are your beliefs on the after life?
People go to the astral plane and conduct a past life review. Those who on balance led positive lives experienced the joy that is called "heaven". Those who led negative lives experienced the pain and regret of such a life and that is called "hell". Once the learning from the life just completed is finished the soul is reborn in a new body to continue its journey.
 
I'm syncretic. I mix different belief systems. I mix different left handed paths such as theistic luciferianism and theistic satanism and demonolatry. I also follow paganism. I worship 4 gods- Samael(Lucifer), Lilith, Bastet, and Loki. Bastet is my patron deity. I also am planning on hiring a geneologist as my mom claims to be native american. If it turns out this is true then I'll be looking into the Lakota Sioux, and seeing if I can learn more about their spiritual beliefs.

no. I first was a christian. Baptist. I left it as it was suffocating. I could not agree with the views regarding sin. And another deity called me.


The Divine is in everything. There is sacredness in the mundane and in the everyday. The divine lies within and outside of you. There are many gods. I'm an animist and a polytheist with pantheistic leanings.

All books are sacred. Knowledge is sacred. So all books are Divine and Holy. Even if the only thing you learn is you disagree with everything in said book.

no. I lead myself.

My church is the earth itself. I honor where i need to.

I honor Bastet- a goddess of health. Thus I must take care of myself. So I'm big on introspection, and doing what is needed to improve myself and I try to keep on top of my health. For example if I don't feel like eating tho I know I must I will eat as an offering to Bastet.

Hmmm...I don't think it'd be affected much. Altho I'm big on questioning and on seeking knowledge due to worshiping Samael. And I also am big on autonomy being a follower of a left handed path. So I'll insist on being informed of said services to make an appropriate decision regarding my health.

Being myself and embracing balance and fluidity
(that is being able to adapt).

Yes. Always question everything.

I believe we cannot know what happens after death. I may have theories but that's just that. Instead lets focus on the here and now and make as much of a positive impact now and here.
Thank you for your responses! We have not studied these belief systems yet (I think next week we will touch on some), so I enjoyed learning about something new.
 
I don't follow a religions tradition. Probably classify me as "spiritual but not religious". I accept Meher Baba as the latest incarnation of the eternal Avatar. I am a member of Sufism Reoriented.

My parents were atheist Jews. I had a number of experiences that caused me to change.

"God alone is real".


We have no "scriptures". We read books by and about Meher Baba. Depending on our interests, we read and study books of all the religious traditions and the works of those who have attained such as Hafiz, Rumi, Ramakrishna Paramhamsa, Ramana Maharshi, St. Francis of Assisi and others.

Rather than try to reproduce what our web site says, I refer you to LINEAGE | Sufism Reoriented


We don't have "worship"/religious services. We do have a meditation practice of remembering God. But to me, the key part of our "worship" is this: “To love God in the most practical way is to love our fellow beings. If we feel for others in the same way as we feel for our own dear ones, we love God.”

There's nothing special. People follow their own inclinations when it comes to staying healthy but generally people tend to eat healthy food. "What comes out of the mouth is much more important than what goes into it"

Again there is nothing special. I see doctors when I have significant symptoms and also get acupuncture and see a chiropractor.

If I had to pick one thing it would be love.

When I was seeking I questioned everything. I was trained as a chemist and then a psychologist. So I was used to asking questions and needing good answers.

People go to the astral plane and conduct a past life review. Those who on balance led positive lives experienced the joy that is called "heaven". Those who led negative lives experienced the pain and regret of such a life and that is called "hell". Once the learning from the life just completed is finished the soul is reborn in a new body to continue its journey.
Thank you for sharing! I will look at that website to learn more about Sufism Reoriented.
 

VoidCat

Pronouns: he/they/it/neopronouns
Thank you for your responses! We have not studied these belief systems yet (I think next week we will touch on some), so I enjoyed learning about something new.
Paganism is not really explained well in schools nor is left handed paths. At least if you live in the bible belt. I do not know how a college might handle it tho.
 

LuisDantas

Aura of atheification
Premium Member
1. What religious tradition do you follow?

You could perhaps call it a blend of self-styled Buddhist and Hindu Dharma with a significant side of skeptical Humanism.

Others will say that I am not religious at all. I don't much care, truth be told.


2. Were you part of the same tradition growing up? If not, which religion did you identify with when you were young, and why do you no longer follow it?

I was never asked. My legal guardians decided that I ought to behave as a Catholic and I guess I did not have a choice.

A while later they decided that I was a very, very bad boy for not seeing the supposed truth of Kardecist Spiritism.

Myself, I could never adhere to a theistic religion. Not my way. But as I said, I was not asked about that.

I did become interested in religion, though. Initially Taoism, shortly later Buddhism. Then I went wholesale.


3. What is your definition or understanding of God or the divine?

Frankly, it has become a hurtful idea, harming the ability of people to understand or practice religions.

One of the reasons is the severe inversion of expecting the god to sustain a religion instead of the other way around. That brought nothing better than confusion.


4. Which text(s) are the scriptures for your religious group?

I learned a bit from the Tripitaka and assorted passages from elsewhere (including the Tannisho and Atisha's Lamp), but mostly I do not value scriptures as a significant source of religious wisdom.

It is for me to validate and take responsibility for whatever I find use for in any texts in my religious practice, not the other way around. I should not hesitate to disregard and correct teachings as I see fit. I would not consider myself religious otherwise.


5. Do you have a spiritual leader? If so, please describe what that person does for you and your group.

I have met inspiring people who taught me nuggets of wisdom along the years, but no particular leader as such. I do not think I have much use for one, truth be told.


6. Where and when do you worship or participate in religious services? Is that the only place where you worship?

No particular place or moment. I don't know that I qualify as a worshipper of anything that would be discernible by casual observers, though.

7. How do your religious beliefs and preferences impact your lifestyle choices when it comes to health and wellness?

Mostly by orienting my values, goals and priorities. But it may easily be the other way around: I shape my beliefs and preferences by my values to the best of my ability.


8. How would your religious beliefs and preferences affect the provision of medical services if you were ill or injured?

Hmm... I would probably refuse Christian or other theistic services if given the choice, insist on donating any organs that I could, and encourage euthanasy if it comes to that at some point.


9. What is the most important part of your religion to you?

Intellectual honesty.


10. Have you ever questioned your faith?

I sure hope that I did. But again, it is likely that I do not value what you would call faith.

11. What are your beliefs on the after life?

I die. Other people survive me. Hopefully I will have had the opportunity to leave them something constructive before that time.
 
You could perhaps call it a blend of self-styled Buddhist and Hindu Dharma with a significant side of skeptical Humanism.

Others will say that I am not religious at all. I don't much care, truth be told.




I was never asked. My legal guardians decided that I ought to behave as a Catholic and I guess I did not have a choice.

A while later they decided that I was a very, very bad boy for not seeing the supposed truth of Kardecist Spiritism.

Myself, I could never adhere to a theistic religion. Not my way. But as I said, I was not asked about that.

I did become interested in religion, though. Initially Taoism, shortly later Buddhism. Then I went wholesale.




Frankly, it has become a hurtful idea, harming the ability of people to understand or practice religions.

One of the reasons is the severe inversion of expecting the god to sustain a religion instead of the other way around. That brought nothing better than confusion.




I learned a bit from the Tripitaka and assorted passages from elsewhere (including the Tannisho and Atisha's Lamp), but mostly I do not value scriptures as a significant source of religious wisdom.

It is for me to validate and take responsibility for whatever I find use for in any texts in my religious practice, not the other way around. I should not hesitate to disregard and correct teachings as I see fit. I would not consider myself religious otherwise.




I have met inspiring people who taught me nuggets of wisdom along the years, but no particular leader as such. I do not think I have much use for one, truth be told.




No particular place or moment. I don't know that I qualify as a worshipper of anything that would be discernible by casual observers, though.



Mostly by orienting my values, goals and priorities. But it may easily be the other way around: I shape my beliefs and preferences by my values to the best of my ability.




Hmm... I would probably refuse Christian or other theistic services if given the choice, insist on donating any organs that I could, and encourage euthanasy if it comes to that at some point.




Intellectual honesty.




I sure hope that I did. But again, it is likely that I do not value what you would call faith.



I die. Other people survive me. Hopefully I will have had the opportunity to leave them something constructive before that time.
I believe it's important to learn about and recognize different spiritual beliefs as well as religious. So thank you for sharing!
 

The Hammer

[REDACTED]
Premium Member
I see, I'm guessing a Christian healthcare organization then.

I just find religious topics unsual for school unless its related to the organizations mission statement

It's common to cover religion in all all sectors of healthcare, as well as social work. Anything that deals with assisting the needs of a religiously diverse public.

It allows them to keep an informed practice with their patients moral and lifestyle views in mind.
 
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