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Why "HOLY FATHER"?

Discussion in 'Catholic DIR' started by angeldluz, Mar 1, 2005.

  1. angeldluz

    angeldluz New Member

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    Hi!:)

    I'm Roman Catholic but I find calling the pope "THE HOLY FATHER" or just "HOLY FATHER" as a bit of a controversy. I mean i know it's out of respect and everything but i think there are other ways to refer to another human being (not saying he's not important or a common person). I believe God to be my one and only "HOLY FATHER" and i feel calling the Pope "HOLY FATHER" it's disrespectful to God. I think we could find very respectful ways to refer to the Pope such as well, "the Pope". I don't mean to start a debate or nething like that but i mean. The Pope is a man afterall NOT the creator of Heaven and Earth and everything in between and outside it. I hope you guys can see my point and if you still wanna call the Pope "HOLY FATHER" Go ahead i can't stop ya. Just think about it. Thanx ;)
     
  2. Scott1

    Scott1 Well-Known Member

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    Ahhh... poor catechism, my least favorite thing.:( .... but you've gotta learn sometime.... I hope that's why you are here!:jiggy:

    The answer is found in Sacred Scripture and Tradition:

    The Priesthood has a special role in the Church ( I hope you've at least been tought about the Sacrament of Holy Orders) and I'm SURE that you don't call your Priest by his first name.... you call him "Father". Holy Orders was instituted by Christ in the Apostles who continue on today as our spiritual fathers. Spiritual fatherhood of priests is seen in Paul’s statement, "I do not write this to make you ashamed, but to admonish you as my beloved children. For though you have countless guides in Christ, you do not have many fathers. For I became your father in Christ Jesus through the gospel" (1 Cor. 4:14–15).

    Peter followed the same custom, referring to Mark as his son: "She who is at Babylon, who is likewise chosen, sends you greetings; and so does my son Mark" (1 Pet. 5:13). The apostles sometimes referred to entire churches under their care as their children. Paul writes, "Here for the third time I am ready to come to you. And I will not be a burden, for I seek not what is yours but you; for children ought not to lay up for their parents, but parents for their children" (2 Cor. 12:14); and, "My little children, with whom I am again in travail until Christ be formed in you!" (Gal. 4:19).

    John said, "My little children, I am writing this to you so that you may not sin; but if any one does sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous" (1 John 2:1); "No greater joy can I have than this, to hear that my children follow the truth" (3 John 4). In fact, John also addresses men in his congregations as "fathers" (1 John 2:13–14).

    By referring to these people as their spiritual sons and spiritual children, Peter, Paul, and John imply their own roles as spiritual fathers. Since the Bible frequently speaks of this spiritual fatherhood, we Catholics acknowledge it and follow the custom of the apostles by calling priests "father." Failure to acknowledge this is a failure to recognize and honor a great gift God has bestowed on the Church: the spiritual fatherhood of the priesthood.

    Catholics know that as members of a parish, they have been committed to a priest’s spiritual care, thus they have great filial affection for priests and call them "father." Priests, in turn, follow the apostles’ biblical example by referring to members of their flock as "my son" or "my child" (cf. Gal. 4:19; 1 Tim. 1:18; 2 Tim. 2:1; Philem. 10; 1 Pet. 5:13; 1 John 2:1; 3 John 4).

    The Roman Pontiff, as the successor of Peter, is the perpetual and visible principle and foundation of unity of both the bishops and of the faithful.(LG 23)

    .... and as so, is first among equals as our spiritual fathers.... and is thus holy, not by his own power, but by the grace of God, the Father, creator of heaven and earth.... and the Catholic Church!

    Omnes cum Petro!
    Scott
     
  3. angeldluz

    angeldluz New Member

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    Thanx for explaining 2 me!! And yes that's why i came into this site. To learn more. And your also right i wasn't taught of that in catechism!!

    But thanx for clarifying.!!!
     
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  4. johnnys4life

    johnnys4life Pro-life Mommy

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    Holy, if you look at the original Biblical word, simply means "set apart."
     
  5. angeldluz

    angeldluz New Member

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    Thanks I didn't know that. "Holy" just seemed more appropriate for God. But i guess if that is what it meant or means then is fine.
     
  6. kalkan

    kalkan Member

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    hello I fom belgium Im mehmet sorry I want to document about adult education and adult catechetics
    please help me Im studying faculty of teology
     
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  7. Joannicius

    Joannicius Active Member

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    WELCOME KALKAN..........There is much here to learn........most here are open and kind, join in and enjoy!

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    I think Holy has a many faceted understanding or just many ways to be interpreted.

    I used to think of Holy as perfect, without flaw and only divine. I have since come to see holy as a result of the access and relationship with the divine that "draws" us from the cares and emphasis of this world's priority and not so mystical that each of us can't be a partaker of the Holy Life IN Christ.

    The "apart or not of this world" understanding. To realize our present life partaking of The Holy Trinity's life as our own and see this life, as we know it now, as temporary as it is.

    Therefore, I have no problem calling someone holy after they have ran the race and finished the fight and kept the faith. Before that we all have a perpetual "fork in the road" and can make a choice at any time to take the way away from God and end our life very unholy. I think that is why Paul could say without reservation that he did not count himself as having attained, but pressed on toward the high calling of God, IN Christ Jesus.

    If another wants to call someone (as the Pope) Holy, then who am I to try and put my understanding or opinion against theirs? It is realy a small thing.
     
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