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Why facts don't change your mind

Discussion in 'Psychology News' started by Orbit, Jan 14, 2022 at 4:04 PM.

  1. Orbit

    Orbit I'm a planet

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    Interesting article here: Why Facts Don’t Change Our Minds

    "Even after the evidence “for their beliefs has been totally refuted, people fail to make appropriate revisions in those beliefs,” the researchers noted. In this case, the failure was “particularly impressive,” since two data points would never have been enough information to generalize from."

    The article is an account of research into why we fail to change our minds when presented with facts that are contrary to our beliefs. It has interesting implications for discussions on both religion and politics.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  2. Nakosis

    Nakosis Time Efficient Lollygagger
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    It is easy to point out someone else's confirmation bias.

    Just says we all have this problem. We are the problem. It is built into our nature.
    The first step is accepting that you have a problem.
     
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  3. Twilight Hue

    Twilight Hue Twilight, not bright nor dark, good nor bad.

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    Sometimes facts alone are not enough. Simply because someone presenting the facts, is not the same as demonstrating said facts.


    In other words, "I'll believe it when I see it" holds true in many cases for those who prefer to hold out a bit longer.
     
  4. savagewind

    savagewind Veteran Member
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    Totally? We do not think so! (emphasis mine).
     
  5. wellwisher

    wellwisher Well-Known Member

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    There are facts and there is also the correct or incorrect context for those facts. Both can lead to different conclusions.

    As an example, say I heard Joe and Betty having a verbal fight during the morning before going to work. This is a fact. Later that day, I see Betty and she has bruises on her face. This is also a fact. From these facts, one might conclude Joe hit Betty during their heated fight.

    However, other facts were left out that could give us better context. Joe wasn't in the city when the bruise occurred, based on witnesses at his job and the testimony of Betty. This is a fact. Betty said she slip on the wet bathroom floor and banged her head. This is also a fact. She then called Joe at work who quickly came home. This is also a fact. All these extra facts giving us better context to drawn the correct conclusion; it was an accident.

    Facts out of the correct context can be misleading. Fake news does this all the time. They present some facts, but leave out other facts so the audience will drawn the desired propaganda conclusion. Psychologists should know this. Facts alone are not enough if we do not have the correct context.
     
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