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Featured Why doesn't the Tanakh say that God is only one person?

Discussion in 'Religions Q&A' started by calm, Jan 24, 2020.

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  1. Lyndon

    Lyndon "Peace is the answer" quote: GOD, 2014
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    Yes God is a grey haired OLD man sitting on a throne in Heaven, isn't that in the Bible??
     
  2. Theo102

    Theo102 Active Member

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    You're conflating YHWH with Elohim. YHWH is one (echad), but Elohim is a plural word.
    Echad can be used to describe unity or to describe one of many. In the shema (Deuteronomy 6:4) there's nothing that would indicate that echad means unity of anything.
     
  3. Theo102

    Theo102 Active Member

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  4. IndigoChild5559

    IndigoChild5559 Loving God and my neighbor as myself.

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    Some words can be both singular and plural, like "one deer," "many deer." Elohim can meany many gods or heavenly beings, or it can refer to the single God of Israel, which has the name of the tetragrammaton. Echad means both a count of one and unity.
     
  5. Theo102

    Theo102 Active Member

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    Not in Hebrew though.

    No, The plural word elohim isn't used in that context.

    כה־אמר יהוה אלהי ישראל שלח את־עמי
    "Thus saith the LORD God of Israel, Let my people go"
    Exodus 5:1
     
  6. LAGoff

    LAGoff Member

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    quote: "In the shema (Deuteronomy 6:4) there's nothing that would indicate that echad means unity of anything.[/QUOTE]

    Rabbi Manis Friedman (the 'superstar rabbi') interprets echad here as God wanting oneness with His people (see 6:5!)
    I am forced however to go by your interpretation, regardless of my regard for the dear rabbi.
     
  7. IndigoChild5559

    IndigoChild5559 Loving God and my neighbor as myself.

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    Yes, this does happen in Hebrew as well. Now, I'm not fluent in Hebrew, so any person who knows Hebrew can correct me ( not you, since you obviously do no speak Hebrew). But this is what I've been taught; not only is Elohim the SINGULAR when used to refer to the One True God (a kind of royal we), but another example would be the word "seed" -- just like in English, it can mean one seed, but more often means many seeds, as in the Seed of Abraham referring to all of Abraham's descendants.
     
  8. Theo102

    Theo102 Active Member

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    The "One True God" can be anything you like. What you're talking about is Elohist doctrine, and from that doctrine you get the conflation of Genesis 1 with Genesis 2, which implies that incest was unavoidable even through it was forbidden. Also you have to apply special rules when interpreting language like אלהי and אלהינו.
     
  9. IndigoChild5559

    IndigoChild5559 Loving God and my neighbor as myself.

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    What I'm talking about is the obvious idea that the God in the Tanakh is the same God whether he is called the tetragrammaton or Elohim or El Shaddai, or any one of a list of other names. The God in Gen 1 and Gen 2 is the same God, even though the two stories are written by very different people in different times. Simply put, only one God exists. Call him what you may, there is only one possible actual deity that may be addressed.
     
  10. Theo102

    Theo102 Active Member

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    Being obvious doesn't make an idea true.

    Alre you talking about Elohim or YHWH Elohim? The point is that when you conflate these two you end up with absurdities like YHWH having a multiple personality disorder.

    If that were true the first commandment of Exodus 20 would be redundant and Psalm 82 would be a nonsense.
     
  11. rosends

    rosends Well-Known Member

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    This is why it is often useless to engage in these conversations -- participants talk at cross purposes and past each other.

    From a Jewish-theological-construct position, the problems that one user raises aren't a problem.

    From a Documentary-hypothesis (or similar literary-deconstruction) position, the answers another gives aren't answers.
     
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