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Why are British English and American English so different?

Discussion in 'Literature' started by Estro Felino, Dec 5, 2018.

  1. Tambourine

    Tambourine Well-Known Member

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    Touchy subject, is it?
     
  2. Jainarayan

    Jainarayan ॐ नमो भगवते वासुदेवाय
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    Only when someone doesn’t know what they’re talking about, trying to show they know something and disparages someone else’s religious traditions.

    Shubhamastu kalyanamastu ca.
     
  3. Stevicus

    Stevicus Veteran Member
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    One entry in that list I found interesting was that the British use the phrase "knock up" to mean "awaken someone."

    In American slang, "knock up" has a completely different connotation.

    Some of it seems a bit off. We use "chest of drawers" in America; it's more common than "bureau," which is what they say the American term is. There seems to be a few other questionable entries on this list.
     
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  4. Tambourine

    Tambourine Well-Known Member

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    Is it important to your religious tradition that modern people sound exactly the same as people from 2000 years ago?
     
  5. Estro Felino

    Estro Felino Believer in free will
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    Not to mention what queer means ...in AE and in BE...:p
     
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  6. Secret Chief

    Secret Chief Meghalayan Ape

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    I agree. Probably shows how quickly some things can changed. "Knocked up" also means got pregnant in the UK (assuming that was your allusion).
     
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  7. Wandering Monk

    Wandering Monk Well-Known Member

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    Two nations divided by a common language.
     
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  8. Jainarayan

    Jainarayan ॐ नमो भगवते वासुदेवाय
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    Yes, it is extremely important.

    Ordinarily at this point I would say this is why you should not speak on what you do not know. I would say go do some homework, and I would walk away. Because instead of asking this question at the outset, what practicing Hindus believe was challenged and virtually mocked by someone who barely knows the religion, if at all. But for the benefit of others who are not so confident in their “knowledge” I’ll explain.

    In Hinduism sound is energy.
    We communicate with our Gods through this sound energy... mantras, other Vedic hymns and chants. They must be chanted exactly as they were revealed to the rishis (sages) and perceived. A mantra has no effect if it’s not pronounced as originally received. There is some wiggle room because everyone has their own individual accent.

    Even when an appliance doesn’t receive the full voltage from the electric grid, e.g. a brown out or faulty connections, it will still work to a degree, though not fully or as intended. The same holds true for Sanskrit. In liturgical use if Sanskrit is pronounced incorrectly or not as closely as possible to its original sound it creates a faulty connection. It may even do damage. Just like a faulty electrical connection.

    If Sanskrit is used as a mundane spoken language, like any other language, near perfect pronunciation is not necessary. Nor is following the rules of sandhi in prose. Writing down sacred writings it is required. For personal use it’s not as important.

    So yeah, it’s important in our religious tradition and why great care is taken to transmit it faithfully from teacher to student for liturgical purposes.
     
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  9. MNoBody

    MNoBody Well-Known Member

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    a good explanation, thank you for being rational and providing that insight, which is indeed a very important matter, despite what modern mindsets assume are unimportant....but it is understandable given how language has been assaulted over the millennia ..it erodes the meanings away.
    example:
    31f2c5e89d78c96b2b04846d758309fc.jpg
    11d9cb362cec8265f50e08c479722736.jpg BeImpeccablewithYourWord.jpg
    3c2bd5ddc83664042bb93ceadb298b3f.png
     

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  10. Tambourine

    Tambourine Well-Known Member

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    Okay, thank you for finally letting me know that this debate was a waste of my time. Take care.
     
  11. Estro Felino

    Estro Felino Believer in free will
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  12. Stevicus

    Stevicus Veteran Member
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    Never heard of "capsicum" for bell pepper.

    And the American speaker said "french fries" when everyone knows it's "freedom fries." :)
     
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  13. Estro Felino

    Estro Felino Believer in free will
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    Imagine that in Italian we have the same term for French fries and chips. So it is pretty confusing...:p
     
  14. beenherebeforeagain

    beenherebeforeagain Rogue Animist
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    I thought it was "Cheese-loving surrender monkey" fries
     
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  15. Estro Felino

    Estro Felino Believer in free will
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    @Revoltingest knows it
     
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  16. Hildeburh

    Hildeburh Member

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    Lol have you ever visited Britain? I was born in Derby in the Midlands and can only understand the Northumbrian dialect because my aunt was born there, my husband struggles. English as spoken in Great Britain is dialectical and a result of historical influences, time and linguistic drift, as is all language
     
    #116 Hildeburh, Oct 20, 2020
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2020
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  17. metis

    metis aged ecumenical anthropologist

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    The irony is that I can much more easily understand the Irish dialect than many of the British dialects, especially Cockney. Even the Scottish dialect I sometimes struggle with.
     
  18. metis

    metis aged ecumenical anthropologist

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    Question: Do you know the difference between a French man and an Italian man?

    Answer: A French man is like an Italian man but with far more brains.:p

    [btw, just by coincidence:rolleyes:, I'm roughly half French]
     
  19. Jayhawker Soule

    Jayhawker Soule <yawn> ignore </yawn>
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    And that's on you. I learned something from @Jainarayan and am thankful for it.
     
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  20. Tambourine

    Tambourine Well-Known Member

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    Was there a point to this post other than a personal attack?
     
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