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Featured Who is the least tolerant?

Discussion in 'General Religious Debates' started by Evangelicalhumanist, Aug 7, 2020.

?
  1. Religious people

    21 vote(s)
    84.0%
  2. Non-religious people

    4 vote(s)
    16.0%
  1. Evangelicalhumanist

    Evangelicalhumanist "Truth" isn't a thing...
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    I have observed, far too often in these forums, that there are people who are essentially intolerant of others who don't conform to one or another set of norms, views, beliefs, sexual expression, and so on. And I've also observed that there are many who are pretty accepting of all sorts of things, usually providing that they do no harm to others.

    Now, I think (and this is based on no rigorous data) that the most intolerant people are very often those who are pursuaded by religious beliefs, often citing scripture to back up their intolerance. And I think that I've also observed (again with no rigorous data) that people who are more accustomed to free thought about everything (that is, not relying on scripture or dogma that is required to be believed) are much less likely to be intolerant of others -- often, in fact, being quite ready to accept and explore other viewpoints, cultures and so forth.

    But many things impact our thinking, and religion (or irreligion), racism (or lack of it), politics, culture and so on inform how we relate with other people. But for my purpose here, I want to restrict the choice to just two: Are religious people more tolerant of human diversity, or are the non-religious more likely to be so?
     
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  2. JustGeorge

    JustGeorge Member

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    I can't fairly answer. I am new on these forums, and my past experiences have been almost totally in person, but I have had poo flung at me from both the religious, and the non religious types almost equally.

    That being said, I think a person's locale comes into play here. I am from the Midwest, but my husband is from the Southern states. While residing in those areas, he got much more trouble from the religious, he says. But, since living here, he's much more often harassed by the non religious.
     
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  3. Mestemia

    Mestemia Advocatus Diaboli
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    Are you asking about my experiences on this forum or my experiences off the forum (real life) or both?
     
  4. sun rise

    sun rise "This is the Hour of God"
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    I suspect the answer depends on what kind of diversity and religion (assuming Pagans and non-traditional religions are involved) as well as location. For example, this is the symbol of my local interfaith group

    [​IMG]
     
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  5. Quintessence

    Quintessence Tale Weaver
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    I'm just going to leave this here: Religion and personality - Wikipedia

    "Open, mature religiosity and spirituality were associated with high Openness to Experience, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness, and with low Neuroticism. Religious fundamentalism was associated with higher Agreeableness, and lower Neuroticism and lower Openness to Experience."

    With the caveat that what "religion" and "religious" means is not... exactly easy to define.
     
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  6. Saint Frankenstein

    Saint Frankenstein Ov Fire and the Void
    Premium Member It's My Birthday!

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  7. Evangelicalhumanist

    Evangelicalhumanist "Truth" isn't a thing...
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    Both...
     
  8. bobhikes

    bobhikes Nowoligist
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    I find lack of tolerance is not tied to belief but to close mindedness.
     
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  9. Evangelicalhumanist

    Evangelicalhumanist "Truth" isn't a thing...
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    So what do you think tends to close the mind more? Honest questioning or adherance to received beliefs?
     
  10. Saint Frankenstein

    Saint Frankenstein Ov Fire and the Void
    Premium Member It's My Birthday!

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    I think it's very rare when people question "received beliefs", religious or not. This is more an issue of innate human psychology than anything else.
     
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  11. ADigitalArtist

    ADigitalArtist Well-Known Member
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    I don't think either answer would be fair. Nonreligious can get just as stuck in the mud and reject diversity. Some of the most anti-theistic societies were still homophobic, transphobic, misogynistic and xenophobic. Meanwhile most religions world wide are not proselytic and can even be early adopters of civil rights struggles.

    I think the real problem is more general human nature problem.
     
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  12. Brickjectivity

    Brickjectivity Veteran Member
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    The people who truly make difference are special people.
    :)


    Shyness and fear do more harm than some idiot saying something mean. I spent most of my life not very intolerant yet not very friendly, not reaching out. That is the real source of intolerance. Its not the stupid people saying hurtful things but the inactive people. Its the shy people who mean no harm but don't do anything. Its also the people who are afraid.

    Religious people ought to know better. Often we do not, and that is shameful and a failure. The whole point of religion is to improve is it not? It is in particular hopefully making young people wise before their time.

    I would rather a person were obnoxious than shy, but neither is desirable. Let there be light.
     
  13. _93

    _93 New Member

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    Religion is literally what creates diversity and tolerance, non-religion has only produced pseudo-secularism (which is more anti-religious than actual secularism).
     
  14. epronovost

    epronovost Well-Known Member

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    Considering the great diversity of religious beliefs and practices, the question is fairly hard to answer though I would say that tolerance of human diversity, equality and freedom is greater amongst non-fundamentalists. There are few amongst the major religions orthodoxy that tolerates or even nurture human diversity, equality and freedom. Most of the major religions orthodoxy were created at a time where such a concept was certainly alien or even "profane". Despite this, pretty much all religion, no matter how orthodox or even taken to fundamentalist extreme have at least a small interest in nurturing agreeableness, loyalty and care within the ranks of the same group.
     
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  15. Power Stone

    Power Stone Unknown Member

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    If there's more religious people then there's more haters in that group and if there's more non-religious people then there's more haters in that group.
     
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  16. epronovost

    epronovost Well-Known Member

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    Research on authoritarian personnality would make you correct. Intolerance is strongly associated with strong conventionalism. Authoritarian people seldom are tolerant of others. The only people who are both extremely intolerant and not conventionnal are social dominators.
     
  17. Deeje

    Deeje Avid Bible Student
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    Don't we first have to define "tolerance"?.....

    "noun. a fair, objective, and permissive attitude toward those whose opinions, beliefs, practices, racial or ethnic origins, etc., differ from one's own; freedom from bigotry. a fair, objective, and permissive attitude toward opinions, beliefs, and practices that differ from one's own."

    So those who hold to a certain set of beliefs, need not be "tolerant" if permitting those beliefs among their own members is offensive to them. But it also doesn't mean that they have to force others (believers or nonbelievers) into compliance if they do not subscribe to your beliefs. That is what "freedom of religion" is all about. You can co-exist with those who hold a different view or set of principles, without forcing them to believe as you do. It is all well and good to share beliefs, and even to criticize what others believe if you know it to be false or based on a false premise....

    For Christians, Christ set the model. He did not 'tolerate' the teachings of the religious leaders of his time....and he made that very public because he knew that what they taught was not correct. Yet he forced no one to listen to him or to act on what he said. He let their choices be their choices.

    It stands to reason that the best platform to take is the one where you 'treat others as you would like to be treated'. If you want people to tolerate you, then be tolerant of them. What they believe is their personal choice.

    "Tolerant of human diversity"? Diversity comes in many forms, but overall in my own conversations with some atheist, science believers here on RF, there seems to be an assumed high ground that they take that, is an illusion IMO. Science becomes the religion of the irreligious and they must preach their own "gospel".

    Their 'beefs' with us Bible believers are often personal and accusations of ignorance and being uneducated get bandied around as if all Bible believers must of necessity be idiots because they reject science. We don't reject science at all, but simply have another explanation for how it all happened. Since science is only guessing about what took place all those millions of years ago in the 'primordial soup', they have no actual proof that what they "believe" is true either. At least we admit that what we believe is taken on "faith".....they don't believe that theirs is. [​IMG]
     
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  18. Left Coast

    Left Coast Plant-Based Plebeian
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    Like others have said, I've seen all kinds, so a broad brush generality is difficult. Most of the more progressive, open-minded people in my life are not formally religious or devout, but have some kind of spiritual beliefs or practices. Sometimes atheists, here and in my offline life, can be a little dogmatically close-minded about religion, writing it all off as superstition and magical thinking. As much as I often sympathize with that view and criticize religion here (especially the fundamentalist kind), I think we can get too rigid in our thinking around it just as fundamentalist believers can.

    Any worldview, I think, can become stifling to a person's growth when it's taken too rigidly and dogmatically. Part of open-mindedness is the willingness to see things from another perspective. We could all, religious and non-religious alike, do more of that.
     
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  19. Sunstone

    Sunstone De Diablo Del Fora
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    May I suggest that the OP is using too broad of a category when it refers to "religious" people. Human religiosity is so diverse that both closed minded groups and open minded groups are subsumed under the same term.
     
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  20. Mestemia

    Mestemia Advocatus Diaboli
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    I see more intolerance here than in real life.
    But then, here is a place where things are discussed, debated, dictated, etc. in more depth than in real life.
    At least for me.
     
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