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Which denomination is most liberal on social issues?

Discussion in 'Liberal Christianity DIRcol' started by MaroonBlue&Gold, Feb 14, 2018.

  1. MaroonBlue&Gold

    MaroonBlue&Gold Eternal Student

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    Hi,

    I have spent my whole life secular and as such have found a lovely secular woman to be my wife. We now have a child and at this point I'm looking toward the inclusion of a God/religion. (To be clear, there are many personal reasons that I am walking this path and I have always had an interest in religion.)

    However, the problem persists that as a secular household, we have developed beliefs that some social issues that the general christian public believe to be a sin are less than and often circumstantial.

    I am finding myself leaning towards the Abrahamic beliefs and Jesus Christ's teachings but my humane beliefs are stopping me from adhering to Christianity.

    I've read articles that agree with my social standings and still conform to Christian belief but I'm yet to discover a single denomination that agrees with all of my social standings and still pertains itself to be Christian.

    The main issues are:
    Homosexuality
    Suicide
    Abortion
    Tattoos/piercings

    Is this a lost cause or can I find a Christian denomination that has a liberal (loving) interpretation of these issues and still adhere to scripture?

    Thank you for your time.
     
  2. Windwalker

    Windwalker Integralist
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    Sometimes it really depends on the congregation, such as one Methodist church I know of which pretty much just does its own thing its own way apart from its parent denomination. Others would be the far more socially liberal and progressive arms of Christianity, such as the Emergence Movement.

    I attend one of these every now and then as a great community. Everyone is welcomed as they are, whether they are straight couples, gay couples with children, trans people, those who no longer believe in God, etc. It is not about beliefs, but rather a community that fellowships together and is involved in many social justice programs, such as seeking to end capital punishment, racial inequalities, women's social and domestic issues, and so forth. They have meditation and yoga classes, and are anything but literalists. @sojourner here on this site can tell you a great deal more about them than I can.
     
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  3. jameslouis114

    jameslouis114 New Member

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    Honestly I think it depends on where you go and the people there, which you can never be sure of. Mostly if you are saying the all around most Liberal I'd have to go with the Episcopal Church which Ive heard is the most widely known liberal Christian religion, for what reason Im not sure of.
    I also feel like a lot of religions get a bad rep because of things of the past and the more conservative traditional members. For example although some people would call the LDS church very conservative our stance on homosexuality is that it is not a choice, sin, or fault of the person, and as long as they uphold celibacy (just like the straight members) they are good people and good Mormons. Mormons usually tend to make a big point of "everyone is welcome in the church", and now the church makes a point to have a lgbt section of our official website. Church leaders have also said that abortion is lawful with reason (i.e. health complications, not being able to care for the child, a pregnancy out of sexual assault etc.).

    I'm not saying that Latter-Day Saints are the most liberal church, not at all, just using it as an example that churches with a republican reputation may have changed or progressed over the years.
     
    #3 jameslouis114, Feb 14, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2018
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  4. metis

    metis aged ecumenical anthropologist

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    Unitarian Universalists followed by the Society of Friends ("Quaker") come to mind.
     
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  5. socharlie

    socharlie Active Member

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    did you check Swedenborgians?
     
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  6. shunyadragon

    shunyadragon Well-Known Member
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    I agree with the UU, but many do not consider UU Christian, and would not conform to New Testament scripture.
     
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  7. Enoch07

    Enoch07 Theistic Rationalist and Libertarian
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    I just consider myself non-denominational. There is some non-denominational churches, but not a lot. I wouldn't consider myself a liberal by today's standards, though. Tattoos/piercings are ok, homosexuality is ok, suicide is never ok but it is what it is, and abortion is always a sticky subject. I don't condone abortion unless the pregnancy was caused by rape/incest or the woman's life was at extreme (more than normal) risk. But still the same time, I am not beating people over the head with a bible over it either.

    Good luck with your search.
     
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  8. David1967

    David1967 Well-Known Member
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    In my part of the country? Probably the Methodist. There is one in OKC that actually hosts some Buddhist monks for meditation classes.
     
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  9. MaroonBlue&Gold

    MaroonBlue&Gold Eternal Student

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    Thanks for all your fast replies.

    Please allow me to clarify my feelings on suicide.

    I think that basically the traditional Christian view is that suicide is murder and as such, a sin. As the murderer can not repent, they are doomed to hell.

    This perspective affords little consideration towards mental illness. If a person takes their own life due to an illness that causes an altered state of mind, then I believe in a loving God that would forgive their actions.

    I certainly don't condone or advocate for suicide. It's the people left behind that suffer.
     
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  10. Quiddity

    Quiddity UndertheInfluenceofGiants

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    That's not going to be difficult to find in most large city areas.

    You should try Unitarian Universalist.

    I mean, you could find one within Christianity, but they all intend to change you in some way. Most religions do.
     
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  11. sojourner

    sojourner Annoyingly Progressive Since 2006

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    United Church of Christ (not to be confused with the very conservative Church of Christ) is one of the most progressive. The Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) is nationally quite progressive, but can be quite conservative locally. You have to find the right congregation.
     
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