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When Hate is a Virtue.

TransmutingSoul

Veteran Member
Premium Member
One can hate the act or war.

One can hate the act of tyranny.

That hate guides people to not being warlike, to not be a tyrant.

Yet the hate does not extend beyond the actions, to the person/s, as all have the capacity to change, to not embrace war or tyranny as a way of life.

A virtue based hate also allows a person to consider just actions against those that create war and tyranny, to the extent required to prevent such actions, as hate will not turn into revenge, but prevention only.

How do you see it?

Regards Tony
 

osgart

Nothing my eye, Something for sure
One can hate the act or war.

One can hate the act of tyranny.

That hate guides people to not being warlike, to not be a tyrant.

Yet the hate does not extend beyond the actions, to the person/s, as all have the capacity to change, to not embrace war or tyranny as a way of life.

A virtue based hate also allows a person to consider just actions against those that create war and tyranny, to the extent required to prevent such actions, as hate will not turn into revenge, but prevention only.

How do you see it?

Regards Tony

I see it that way as well. A rightful hate is a good thing. Senseless hatred is totally different than hate with cause.

Of all the things to hate, all of those things can't be justified, they are senseless and baseless injustices. Evil is without any good reason and makes no sense. I think the root of evil is in false pride, or arrogance. Evil by definition seeks to destroy what is worthy and good. It's good to hate it.

There are other things besides evil that I hate. Such as intense pain and suffering. If I'm suffering for a good reason then that's not so bad.
 

Nakosis

Non-Binary Physicalist
Premium Member
One can hate the act or war.

One can hate the act of tyranny.

That hate guides people to not being warlike, to not be a tyrant.

Yet the hate does not extend beyond the actions, to the person/s, as all have the capacity to change, to not embrace war or tyranny as a way of life.

A virtue based hate also allows a person to consider just actions against those that create war and tyranny, to the extent required to prevent such actions, as hate will not turn into revenge, but prevention only.

How do you see it?

Regards Tony

I suppose people are easier driven by emotion than reason.
 

InvestigateTruth

Well-Known Member
One can hate the act or war.

One can hate the act of tyranny.

That hate guides people to not being warlike, to not be a tyrant.

Yet the hate does not extend beyond the actions, to the person/s, as all have the capacity to change, to not embrace war or tyranny as a way of life.

A virtue based hate also allows a person to consider just actions against those that create war and tyranny, to the extent required to prevent such actions, as hate will not turn into revenge, but prevention only.

How do you see it?

Regards Tony
Hating the wrong things is fine, but hating enemies is not a virtue. Love your enemies is a virtue
 

MonkeyFire

Well-Known Member
There is no point to war in a Heavenly universe, except to give the soldiers of Heaven their existence.
 

Truthseeker

Non-debating member when I can help myself
I see it that way as well. A rightful hate is a good thing. Senseless hatred is totally different than hate with cause.

Of all the things to hate, all of those things can't be justified, they are senseless and baseless injustices. Evil is without any good reason and makes no sense. I think the root of evil is in false pride, or arrogance. Evil by definition seeks to destroy what is worthy and good. It's good to hate it.

There are other things besides evil that I hate. Such as intense pain and suffering. If I'm suffering for a good reason then that's not so bad.
I agree with most of it, but I don't think hate of suffering is good either. Not even for other people. That, I believe, turns into dislike of God quite a bit. I see that in Susan (@Trailblazer). She, along with my wife, are my best friends, but this is not good for her. I have some understanding of why she feels that way, and it doesn't damn her.
 

TransmutingSoul

Veteran Member
Premium Member
I think that both hate and love are false friends and bear with them the perils of attachment to the external world.

Yes, that is another way of seeing it, as all things need moderation. All things can be harmful, if carried to excess.

Maybe we need to cleanse our heart, that no remnant of either love or hate may linger therein, lest that love blindly incline us to error, or that hate repel us away from the truth.

Regards Tony
 

osgart

Nothing my eye, Something for sure
I agree with most of it, but I don't think hate of suffering is good either. Not even for other people. That, I believe, turns into dislike of God quite a bit. I see that in Susan (@Trailblazer). She, along with my wife, are my best friends, but this is not good for her. I have some understanding of why she feels that way, and it doesn't damn her.

So you think all suffering has purpose. Sometimes I feel that a lot of it is just pointless. But even pointless suffering can draw out a person's character to overcome. And I guess that can make a person stronger.
 

TransmutingSoul

Veteran Member
Premium Member
That implies:
"one hates part of God (His Creation)"

This is a talk that inspired my ideas.

"In the innate nature of things there is no evil—all is good. This applies even to certain apparently blameworthy attributes and dispositions which seem inherent in some people, but which are not in reality reprehensible. For example, you can see in a nursing child, from the beginning of its life, the signs of greed, of anger, and of ill temper; and so it might be argued that good and evil are innate in the reality of man, and that this is contrary to the pure goodness of the innate nature and of creation. The answer is that greed, which is to demand ever more, is a praiseworthy quality provided that it is displayed under the right circumstances. Thus, should a person show greed in acquiring science and knowledge, or in the exercise of compassion, high-mindedness and justice, this would be most praiseworthy. And should he direct his anger and wrath against the bloodthirsty tyrants who are like ferocious beasts, this too would be most praiseworthy. But should he display these qualities under other conditions, this would be deserving of blame." – Abdu’l-Baha, Some Answered Questions, newly revised edition, pp. 248-249.

Regards Tony
 

Spirit of Light

Be who ever you want
One can hate the act or war.

One can hate the act of tyranny.

That hate guides people to not being warlike, to not be a tyrant.

Yet the hate does not extend beyond the actions, to the person/s, as all have the capacity to change, to not embrace war or tyranny as a way of life.

A virtue based hate also allows a person to consider just actions against those that create war and tyranny, to the extent required to prevent such actions, as hate will not turn into revenge, but prevention only.

How do you see it?

Regards Tony
I try not to hate anything or anyone in this world.

But taking a strong stands against any form of voilence and war is an healthy way of living, IMHO.
 

TransmutingSoul

Veteran Member
Premium Member
I try not to hate anything or anyone in this world.

But taking a strong stands against any form of voilence and war is an healthy way of living, IMHO.

Way to go, Regards Tony.

P/S An impossible task I would offer, that is not to consider one hates injustice and tyranny. What else can we call it.

Indifference?

Regards Tony
 

stvdv

Veteran Member
This is a talk that inspired my ideas.
Knowing the differences between anger and hate, I would have been shocked if Baha'u'llah would've agreed using the word "hate" in this context (shocked, as in not being able to see Him as a prophet anymore)

I am glad to read that Abdu’l-Baha has not used the word "hate" but used "anger" instead. Masters are very specific in their word choice, and I try to not use different words, as the Teaching easily gets a totally different vibe, as in this case
 
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