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what's the name of god Adonai, Elohim or Yahwah

Discussion in 'Judaism DIR' started by dynavert2012, Jan 31, 2014.

  1. dynavert2012

    dynavert2012 Active Member

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    what's the name of god that is being mentioned in the Hebrew old testament? i got confused about that and seek for a help specially if i received answer from a native Hebrew speaker :)

    thanks in advance..
     
  2. Tumah

    Tumah Veteran Member

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    All of these and more are used in the Hebrew Scriptures to refer to G-d.
     
  3. dynavert2012

    dynavert2012 Active Member

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    as a title or as a name?
     
  4. Tumah

    Tumah Veteran Member

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    That's a good question. As far as I know, the only time the words "my name" is connected to a name in Scriptures, it is connected to the Tetragrammaton. In Judaism, we say that the Tetragrammaton is G-d's name and the rest are "nick-names." I guess like titles. But in Scriptures, it doesn't actually say, "this is my name and those are my titles."
     
  5. dynavert2012

    dynavert2012 Active Member

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    thanks, this Tetragrammaton is the four letters? if yes, do you pronounce it in Hebrew as adonai or as YHWH?
     
  6. Tumah

    Tumah Veteran Member

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    It's the four letter name. We don't pronounce the name because of its holiness, we substitute A-donai instead. (We don't say any of the names outside of prayers either, but that one we don't even say in prayer.)
     
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  7. dynavert2012

    dynavert2012 Active Member

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    thank you, some Christians claim the original name is Jehohvah or YHVH, i don't want you to say the name but is it that name or they got it wrong? even don't write it if it's against your religion
     
  8. Tumah

    Tumah Veteran Member

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    The letters Y-H-V-H are a transliteration of the Hebrew letters of the Tetragrammaton.
    The reason why Christians say Jehovah is because when they started translating the Scriptures, they used the German J because that is the letter they use to make the "Y" sound. The rest of the name are probably derived from prounouncing the name as its often (but not always) spelled in the Aleppo Codex. But the Aleppo Codex itself only used the vowel point configuration for convenience. According to some, the authors took the vowel points from "L'OLaM" which means "forever" to imply that G-d is eternal. So you get "Y'-HoVaH". But the AC also uses other vowel points like the ones from "E-LoHiM", so that it would be "Y-eHoViH". It was just a convenience that some Christians ran with.
     
  9. Caladan

    Caladan Agnostic Pantheist

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    As noted, the Tetragrammaton is the closest in Judaism to God having a name. However YHVH (the Tetragrammaton) is commonly associated with the Hebrew Biblical term Eheye Asher Eheye, or I Am That I Am (varieties of English translations exist, a common Jewish one is I Will Be What I Will Be, which makes more linguistic sense). So following such association even as a 'name' YHVH is more of an abstract and renders anthropomorphic use as out of context of meaning.
    Jews pronounce the Tetragrammaton as 'Adonai' meaning 'my Lord'.
     
  10. Akivah

    Akivah Well-Known Member

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    I think G-d is referred to by over 50 different words. The words normally describe the human understanding of G-d's actions at the time. But our G-d doesn't actually have a name as humans think of it.
     
  11. dynavert2012

    dynavert2012 Active Member

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    makes sense
     
  12. dynavert2012

    dynavert2012 Active Member

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    so the Hebrews don't consider this Tetragrammaton as a name but it's a sentence, i got it right?
     
  13. Levite

    Levite Higher and Higher

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    It's actually representative of God's eternality, His paradoxical nature. The word represents the verb "to be" simultaneously conjugated into all three tenses. Such a word, if translated, could only be rendered by a phrase rather than a single word. Yet it is also a Name. Not God's only Name, but a Name nonetheless.
     
  14. Marco19

    Marco19 Researcher

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    Is it correct that in both two temples eras, the name was pronounced by the main/chief priest who gets the access into the holy of holies?
    or till first century most Jews (both priest & lay people) knew and pronounced the name while praying?
     
  15. Levite

    Levite Higher and Higher

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    It was pronounced by the High Priest during the time of the First Temple, and through part of the era of the Second Temple, but the correct pronunciation seems to have been lost sometime before the fall of the Second Temple-- how long before is unclear.

    However it had apparently ceased to be routinely pronounced in daily life by most Jews early in the First Temple period.
     
  16. Pegg

    Pegg Jehovah our God is One

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    What about the declaration at Exodus 3:15?

    Is that not considered a personal name?
     
  17. Akivah

    Akivah Well-Known Member

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    Exo 3:15 So Moses said, "Let me turn now and see this great spectacle why does the thorn bush not burn up?"

    Nothing in there about a personal name.
     
  18. Tumah

    Tumah Veteran Member

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    That's 3:3
     
  19. Akivah

    Akivah Well-Known Member

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    Whoops. Thanks Tumah.

    And G-d said further to Moses, "So shall you say to the children of Israel, 'The Lord G-d of your forefathers, the G-d of Abraham, the G-d of Isaac, and the G-d of Jacob, has sent me to you.' This is My name forever, and this is how I should be mentioned in every generation.

    We don't view this as G-d's name, it is more of a description.
     
  20. Seth_Graham

    Seth_Graham New Member

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    Yod representing the concrete/physical elements of existence, wau being the ethereal/fluid elements with the 2 hehs symbolizing the perfectly whole ideal of the other letters... This being based on the hebraic numerology/bibliomantic worldview of the time. A fitting analogy for a Unitarian Deity that encompasses all other deities into a ONE-SOURCE Deity.
     
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