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What book r u reading?

JIMMY12345

Active Member
I bet The Bible, The Koran, The Veda's The Torah will all be mentioned but does not have to be religious.
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I was in a charity shop and picked up David Niven's The Worlds a balloon. Hilarious 6/10.
Your turn.

Who Cares: The Hidden Crisis of Caregiving, and How We Solve It - the 2023 Orwell Prize Finalist Hardcover – 27 April 2023​

by Emily Kenway (Author)
4.6 4.6 out of 5 stars 25 ratings

WHO CARES by Emily Kenway 2023

Most books are a waste of time and space.This book is essential reading for all Parents and all children.In 1967 People born 1 in 5 do not have children.They and people with children essential reading 8/10.It picks up on never discussed issues and things we never thought about that WILL impact most of us eventually.


*FINALIST FOR THE ORWELL PRIZE FOR POLITICAL WRITING 2023*

'A visceral, unsparing picture of our current situation' ROB DELANEY

'A radical vision for how we might do things better ' LADY BRENDA HALE

'A rallying cry we should all heed' TLS

A ground-breaking book lifting the lid on the hidden side of the 'care crisis' - helping us reimagine our world to put caregiving at its heart

When Emily Kenway found herself in the painful position of caring for her cancer-stricken mother, her life was changed forever. Though she was lonely, she was far from alone: around the world, millions of people are quietly caring for unwell, elderly or disabled loved ones. For many, this is a full-time job, saving economies billions. But the human cost remains largely ignored.

Why are caregivers mostly women? As families shrink, how can we provide care? Can care robots be the answer? And what does death anxiety have to do with all this? Through unflinching investigation, Who Cares asks vital questions about why we have a 'care crisis' at both a global and individual level.

Deftly blending memoir with forensic research and the voices of caregivers from as far afield as Norway, Nepal and Nebraska, Who Cares is an essential read for anyone who has ever cared for, or will receive care from, another person - which is to say, for everyone.

More Praise for Who Cares:

'An impassioned call to action' Sunday Times
'Vitally important' Jon McGregor
'Striking, honest and intimate' Dazed
'A compassionate hybrid of memoir and manifesto' New Statesman
'A book we all must read' Silvia Federici
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sophiada

New Member
I'm currently reading "A Day in the Life of Abed Salama" by Nathan Thrall. It's a gripping narrative exploring the complexities of life in the Middle East through a compelling character's experiences.
 

exchemist

Veteran Member
I'm currently reading "A Day in the Life of Abed Salama" by Nathan Thrall. It's a gripping narrative exploring the complexities of life in the Middle East through a compelling character's experiences.
Thanks for this. For anyone interested, I've found a review of this book, which seems to have excellent reviews, here: A Day in the Life of Abed Salama by Nathan Thrall review – a collision in closeup

(The reviewer, Jonathan Freedland, is Jewish, as is the author of the book, Nathan Thrall, but neither of them shies away from the injustices experienced by the Palestinians in the Occupied Territories.)
 

jbg

Active Member
I just finished reading The Arc of a Covenant: The United States, Israel and the Fate of the Jewish People by Walter Russell Mead. Arc is a tour d' force of greatness, no question. Mead seeks to take the course of U.S. history as it relates to Jews and then Israel from the Washington presidency through 2022. Without serving as a spoiler, Mead effectively makes the argument that Israel's importance to the U.S. stems more from its military and economic success and power than it does to the impact of the "Jewish" or "Israel" lobby. Indeed, he very effectively belittles the impact of the lobbies asa being the equivalent of Star Trek's "vulcans;" an imaginary force thought to be creating a wobble in Mercury's or Venus's orbit. He states: "Not only does Israel occupy a "continent" in the American mind; Jews, at 1.9 % of the population...." in arguing that the focus on Israel is out of proportion to Jewish numbers. The contrast is even starker when compared to an estimated worldwide population at 15.7 million, 0.2% of the 8 billion worldwide population. What the author leaves out is that the Jews, historically, have had a disproportionate pull on the world psycho.

I do have my quibbles with the book: 1) there are lots of run-on and awkwardly constructed sentences; 2) the book illustrates the dictum in intro to Practicing History: Selected Essays by Barbara W. Tuchman, that it is hard to write good history close to the occurrence of events. It certainly was, and is; and 3) part of point II, the last two chapters, on the history of the relationship under Obama, Trump and Biden are not yet history given how recent they are.

While I do not accept 100% of the author's opinions, the book is an indispensable starting point of any serious analysis and understanding.
 
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Mock Turtle

Oh my, did I say that!
Premium Member
Half-way through this easy read:

Unconventional Wisdom (2020) by Tom Standage - As per the title, some unusual and often counter-intuitive facts brought to light by the deputy editor of The Economist - such as:

How pregnancy makes people more law-abiding (For both females and males, but it doesn't last)
Why do countries with more democracy want less of it? (Who knows!)
Why Americans' lives are getting shorter (Drug overdoses, alcohol-related diseases, and suicides, amongst others are cited)
Etc.
 

Yerda

Veteran Member
If he is the geezer who wrote "Grapes of wrath" Steinbeck is up with the greats
One morning I got off the train, on my way to work, with that book in my hand. And some guy came up to me and said that I should stick with it and that it was one of the best books he'd ever read.

Fair play to that guy, I stuck with it and it was pretty special.
 

Regiomontanus

Ματαιοδοξία ματαιοδοξιών! Όλα είναι ματαιοδοξία.
I am really enjoying the new, gloriously massive, book by the modern go-to historian of the late ('Byzantine') Roman empire, Anthony Kaldellis:



A real page-turner!
 

Mock Turtle

Oh my, did I say that!
Premium Member
Half-way through this easy read:

Unconventional Wisdom (2020) by Tom Standage - As per the title, some unusual and often counter-intuitive facts brought to light by the deputy editor of The Economist - such as:

How pregnancy makes people more law-abiding (For both females and males, but it doesn't last)
Why do countries with more democracy want less of it? (Who knows!)
Why Americans' lives are getting shorter (Drug overdoses, alcohol-related diseases, and suicides, amongst others are cited)
Etc.
Finished that, and quite entertaining, but this next wasn't - perhaps because I misjudged it. I should probably have looked it up for a review before buying it as it is more academic than descriptive and hence less approachable for people not particularly wanting such. Hence just skipped through:

Rakes, Highwaymen, and Pirates (2009) by Erin Mackie

 

The Hammer

[REDACTED]
Premium Member
IMG20240406150424~2.jpg
 

JustGeorge

Not As Much Fun As I Look
Staff member
Premium Member
I've been trying to read out of many books very slowly, with the intention of information retention. I've experimented with this over the last month or two, and have found it has improved things for me, so I'll continue.

Last read out of The Golden Dawn(Israel Regardie). Really more of a tome than a book; has a lot of interesting tidbits, random facts and rituals. Last night I examined some of the meaning behind a few of the Hebrew letters.
 
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