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The Kindness Box

Discussion in 'Ethics and Morals' started by Knight of Albion, Apr 2, 2014.

  1. Geoff-Allen

    Geoff-Allen Resident megalomaniac

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  2. Geoff-Allen

    Geoff-Allen Resident megalomaniac

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    Doing kind things for others can also increase your happiness and sense of satisfaction, according to a 2016 Oxford University study. "When we are kind, the brain reacts positively and similar to simple pleasures, we get chemical releases such as serotonin that can promote a positive mood," Hughes says. Dopamine also rushes through the body, and the brain signals "a particular type of elation" as a result. This is known as a "helper's high."

    So find ways to give back to others. It could be as simple as being present and listening to a friend or colleague, it could be a random act of kindness like making someone coffee, or you can go out there and volunteer. When you do good for others, you do good for yourself.

    More from this site -

    7 Hacks For Finding Happiness That Actually Work, According To Science

    :)
     
  3. Geoff-Allen

    Geoff-Allen Resident megalomaniac

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    Found another article and website -

    The Growing with Gratitude program is all about teaching children the valuable skills of kindness, gratitude and mindfulness from an early age, helping teachers, students and families to pass on these tools so children develop greater resilience, emotional and physical wellbeing, and promoting positive thoughts and habits.

    The passion: What inspired you to set up your business?
    While working as a primary school physical education teacher in my early 30s I stumbled across a couple of books by thought leaders and scientists who were studying positive psychology and its impact on happiness, health and lifestyle.

    The more I read, the more my interest in this area grew, not just because it tied into my own goals of improving the wellbeing and health of young children, but because the ideas resonated with my own journey and personal challenges at the time.

    Over the next few years I continued to read and research as much as I could. I attended conferences on the topic, read books by popular authors and psychologists such as Martin Seligman, Barbara Frederickson, Sonja Lyubomirsky, and Shawn Achor among others, and adopted the best of their advice into my own daily life.

    And after awhile I realised that all the research and studies were really saying the same thing: that contrary to our society’s long-held belief that ‘success’ is the doorway to happiness, gratitude and acceptance are the real indicators of future health, happiness and success in life.

    For the full interview -

    Growing with Gratitude: We speak to founder Ash Manuel – The Natural Parent Magazine

    All the best!
     
  4. Geoff-Allen

    Geoff-Allen Resident megalomaniac

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  5. Geoff-Allen

    Geoff-Allen Resident megalomaniac

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    “Real meaning and true happiness come from thinking about other people—and from actions that bring meaning or joy to other peoples’ lives,” says Christine Carter, Ph.D., sociologist and senior fellow at UC Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center and the author of Raising Happiness: 10 Simple Steps for More Joyful Kids and Happier Parents.

    Read the script below slowly to yourself, pausing at the end of each sentence for reflection:

    This person has a body and a mind, just like me.

    This person has feelings, emotions, and thoughts, just like me.

    This person has, at some point in his or her life, been sad, disappointed, angry, hurt, or confused, just like me.

    This person has, in his or her life, experienced physical and emotional pain and suffering, just like me.

    This person wishes to be free from pain and suffering, just like me.

    This person wishes to be healthy and loved, and to have fulfilling relationships, just like me.

    This person wishes to be happy, just like me.


    Read the article here -

    2 Simple Ways To Create A Kinder World - Mindful

    :)
     
  6. Geoff-Allen

    Geoff-Allen Resident megalomaniac

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    If you’re familiar to meditation, then you’ve probably tried a basic loving-kindness practice. It involves bringing to mind someone you love, and wishing that they are safe, well, and happy—either out loud or to yourself. The practice continues by extending these well wishes outward to those around you: maybe a more neutral party, or even a difficult person in your life.

    Repeating these phrases feels good in the moment, but they can also have long-term effects on our brains that stick with us after we’ve finished meditating. Daniel Goleman, author of Primal Leadership: Unleashing the Power of Emotional Intelligence and co-author of Altered Traits, explains how this type of meditation can impact our mind and our outlook “right from the get go,” in this video from BigThink:

    More of the article here -

    Why Your Brain Loves Kindness - Mindful

    :)
     
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