1. Welcome to Religious Forums, a friendly forum to discuss all religions in a friendly surrounding.

    Your voice is missing! You will need to register to get access to the following site features:
    • Reply to discussions and create your own threads.
    • Our modern chat room. No add-ons or extensions required, just login and start chatting!
    • Access to private conversations with other members.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon!

Skinny Buddha Vs. Fat Buddha

Discussion in 'Buddhism DIR' started by Azakel, Jan 18, 2008.

  1. Azakel

    Azakel Liebe ist für alle da

    Messages:
    5,401
    I don't mean vs like a fight, but that I have seen picture and statues of the Skinny Buddha and then the Buddha most people are use to seeing, the Fat one that's all was smiling. What's the different(other then ones skinny and the other fat). Does it just depend on the school(or type) of Buddhism?
     
  2. koan

    koan New Member

    Messages:
    519
    The skinny Buddha is Sakyamuni Buddha, the historical Buddha. The fat one is not really Buddha at all, but an Icon of a Chinese monk whom they believe was a reincarnation of Matreiya the future Buddha. In Chinese, his name is Budai Luohan and in Japanese, Hotei.
     
    Azakel likes this.
  3. Azakel

    Azakel Liebe ist für alle da

    Messages:
    5,401
    Thank you, I did not know that. But now I do. One more question, though the fat Buddha(Budai) is not really Buddha then, is it still alright to refer to him as such, or is it just ignorance then to do so(if you know the difference).
     
  4. Francine

    Francine New Member

    Messages:
    2,343
    Isn't Fat Buddha's girth evidence that he has not purged himself of desire for milk shakes?
     
    Willamena and Don Penguinoini like this.
  5. Somkid

    Somkid Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,739
    That is exactly right and the only answer. Hotei is depicted as fat to show abundance of love, compassion, wisdom, virtue, etc. And every one loves a fat jolly guy.
     
  6. Azakel

    Azakel Liebe ist für alle da

    Messages:
    5,401
    Ok, so Hotei is a Buddha(Just not the first one), and the reason why he is shown has Fat is to incorporate that he is full of love, compassion, wisdom, virtue, and so on.
     
  7. Somkid

    Somkid Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,739
    There are many interpretations of Hotei I agree with the above but that is from the Chinese prospective and we call Hotei (Japanese Name) Budai or Putai in Chinese.
    He to be an incarnation of Miroku Bosatsu known as Miluo Fo in China(or as Miluo Pusa) Known as the Fat Buddha or Laughing Buddha in the West.

    Ok, I'll tell you everything I know about this topic as it seems to have peaked some interest.

    In Japan Hotei is known as the god of contentment and happiness, and is the god of good luck from Shintosim, Hotei. He is supposedly based on Miluo Fo, and is widely recognized outside of Japan. He is generally depicted carrying a large cloth bag over his back, one that never empties, he uses it to feed the poor and needy.

    The Japanese spelling of "Ho Tei" means "cloth bag." He also holds a Chinese fan called an oogi (said to be a "wish giving" fan, this type of fan was used by the aristocracy to indicate to vassals that their requests would be granted. Hotei is most likely based on the itinerant 10th-century Chinese Buddhist monk and hermit Budaishi who is said to be an incarnation of Miroku Bodhisattva as I mentioned above
    (Maitreya in Sanskrit for those interested).

    Hotei is sometimes shown surrounded by a group of small children, playing and laughing around his very round shape.

    In recent times, Hotei is also referred to as the patron saint of restaurateurs and bartenders I'm sure you see him in every Chinese restaurant in in the world (and on the dash of my car to remind me to be generous where ever I go). When you over eat or over drink (that would ever happen) the Chinese sometimes jokingly say your under Hotei's influence, well its funny in Chinese anyway .
     
    Azakel likes this.
  8. vandervalley

    vandervalley New Member

    Messages:
    483
    Buddhas and Bhodisattavas have many different forms and certainly are not restricted to the forms depicted by statues. They can change forms whenever they wish.

    If I remember correctly Matreiya Bhodissatva (the "chubby" Buddha as some call it) was depicted as rather skinny in central Aisa (Afghanistan and Pakistan) when Buddhism was still there hundreds of years ago.

    Statues are made to look like whatever people of that region wish it to look like. In Buddhism how statues look like are not important at all; the teachings are more important.

    I have seen a Buddha statue in USA and it looked nothing like the ones from East Asia.
     
    Azakel likes this.
  9. vandervalley

    vandervalley New Member

    Messages:
    483
  10. Kungfuzed

    Kungfuzed Student Nurse

    Messages:
    1,995
    A Japanese Santa Clause!
     
  11. Azakel

    Azakel Liebe ist für alle da

    Messages:
    5,401
    Thank you all of the replies. Now I know a bit more about the Buddhas, I guess now the best thing to do is go look for some info myself on the rest. ^_^
     
  12. koan

    koan New Member

    Messages:
    519
    No, a Chinese Santa Clause, adopted by the Japanese.
     
  13. Somkid

    Somkid Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,739
    Exactly :yes:
     
  14. Azakel

    Azakel Liebe ist für alle da

    Messages:
    5,401
    Ether way I like him.
     
  15. zenzero

    zenzero Its only a Label

    Messages:
    12,249
    Friend Azakel,
    Yes am sure you have the information you wanted.
    Like to add that humans always create their gods according to their own perception and so are the figures of buddha. In India people take fat people to be Tamasic which means lazy and does not go well with enlightened people and the same in another culture is a sign of fun loving, happy etc.
    so it is the culture of the place which gave rise to differnt forms as in reality none should be attached to any forms even that of buddha.
    Love & rgds
     
  16. Don Penguinoini

    Don Penguinoini Modi.

    Messages:
    9,244
    Religion:
    Hindu Atheist
    Weren't some types of Buddhas are Hellenistic? Originally during the Kushan periods of India. I think.
     
  17. vandervalley

    vandervalley New Member

    Messages:
    483
  18. Somkid

    Somkid Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,739
    These are not the Buddhas we are talking about, we are talking about Budai the Chinese Buddhist monk who lived in the Liang Dynasty.

    Budai - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
  19. vandervalley

    vandervalley New Member

    Messages:
    483
    I was refering to penguino's post which is quoted below

     
  20. Pariah

    Pariah Let go

    Messages:
    809
    Kushans are not considered Indian - in fact, during the reign of the legendary Vikramaditya Chandragupta II, they were foreign invaders which he (and the people of India) wished to push from Indian lands.

    Under Emperor Ashoka Maurya, Bharat (or "India") was then all of Afghanistan and Pakistan. He was the one to spread Buddhism throughout Greco-Bactria (ancient name for Afghanistan) and the Hellenic world, where the Bamiyan Buddhas once stood.

    But those Buddhas do not correspond to the Chinese "Laughing Buddha".
     
Verification:
Draft saved Draft deleted