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Sanskrit vs English

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by SalixIncendium, Oct 14, 2018.

  1. SalixIncendium

    SalixIncendium अहं ब्रह्मास्मि
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    I understand that English terms' definitions are subject to interpretation base on the most popular use. I've read that Sanskrit terms are much more specific and that there is little to no need to interpret meaning.

    I'm asking anyone who is familiar with or fluent in Sanskrit to confirm or deny that this is the case.
     
  2. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Be your own guru

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    IMHO, Sanskrit terms are also subject to interpretation. More than English or less than English - I do not think anyone has done research on this.
     
  3. ameyAtmA

    ameyAtmA ज्ञानं सदाशिवात्‌ मोक्षं जनार्दनात्‌
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    ज्ञानं इच्‍छेत्‌ सदाशिवात्‌ मोक्षं इच्‍छेत्‌ जनार्दनात्‌
    There is grammar and then there is usage

    English grammar is irregular
    SanskRt grammar is regular , follows a pattern

    SanskRt terms also have multiple meanings, but where it gets tricky while interpreting ancient shloka is the sandhi - when two or more words are joined, I think

    Also when the phrases in a shlok can be interpreted differently (semantics, context)
    like .. where you put the brackets matters a * ( b + c)? or (a * b) + c?

    BG chapter 13 anAdi (matparam) bramhan' ?
    OR
    (anAdimat) parambramhan ?
     
  4. sayak83

    sayak83 Well-Known Member
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    That is not true. What is however true is that Sanskrit often has many more terms for things English has only one or two, especially for topics of religious or philosophical discussion pertaining to Indian scriptures.
     
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