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Featured Religiously/Spiritually Based Diet

Discussion in 'Interfaith Discussion' started by SalixIncendium, Jan 14, 2018.

  1. A Vestigial Mote

    A Vestigial Mote Well-Known Member

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    I'm vegan for ethical reasons, and ethics is just about all the "spirituality" I tend to dip into. Not quite sure whether that even qualifies as "spiritual" - though I do highly empathize with the animals involved - whose freedom is entirely halted, sickness and pain are mostly ignored with the animal unable to even care for itself in the ways it might in the wild - having to instead rely on whatever it is provided in terms of warmth, shelter, food and water - even direct abuse is common and a blind eye is usually the only one "looking". Not to mention that, through breeding, we have basically prepped the animals in all the ways we find beneficial/convenient to the production mode - completely disconnecting them from their needs for environmental survival. Basically de-evolving them to the point that survival on their own in "the wild" probably isn't even an option for many varieties of cow/chicken/pig by this point.

    I suppose the consequences of breaking my resolve on my diet are knowing that I am propagating that pain and suffering in the world - which does not feel good/right. Other than that, there are none. I obviously do not face judgment by the majority of my fellow humans for eating meat/dairy/etc. Even if I did, I wouldn't necessarily heed their objections unless they were based in reality as we experience it in the here and now - like the forced-breeding/pain/suffering of farm animals is.
     
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  2. Jainarayan

    Jainarayan ॐ नमो भगवते वासुदेवाय
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    In my practice there's really nothing scriptural, doctrinal or dogmatic about diet. It's a matter of ahimsa and karmic cause and effect. It sounds like a cop-out but I think one's dharma has a lot to do with it. I'm not Gaudiya Vaishnava, so I don't restrict onions, garlic, or spices. In fact, some of the spiciest rice one can find is as temple prasadam at my temple.

    Side note:
    This sounds a lot like my leanings. I really would like to go at least pesco-/ovo-veg, if not fully lacto-veg. I try and can usually make it to a few months just with chicken, eggs, dairy and seafood. Currently the only mammal flesh I eat is pork (Italian sausage and roasted pork shoulder aka pernil in the Hispanic community). I'm in the supermarket, I turn my back, and before I know it the Italian sausage and pork shoulder seem to jump into my shopping cart.

    I don't eat beef; no veal (baby beef); never had goat or mutton (goat and mutton are two different things in the US); no lamb (no reason to eat a baby animal, besides, I don't care for it); I had bison years ago. Bison is actually not bison, it's a hybrid of (American) bison and beef. I have no access to venison, except the ones that keep hitting my truck (deer with suicide ideations :rolleyes: but you can't harvest roadkill in NJ). I stopped eating platypuses a long time ago... they're just so hard to get these days! :D
     
  3. Phantasman

    Phantasman Well-Known Member

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    I believe the mind can become intoxicated on water if they have the faith that it is wine they they drink.
     
  4. Akivah

    Akivah Well-Known Member

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    Yes. Judaism.

    I can never eat pig, shellfish, catfish, or predator animals. None of those animals are kosher. I also don't eat meat and diary together.

    It is a sin if I break it for which I have to atone for.
     
  5. metis

    metis aged ecumenical anthropologist

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    Then why did I see you eating a cheeseburger with pork rinds the other day? :mad:
     
  6. QuestioningMind

    QuestioningMind Well-Known Member

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    Religious dietary restrictions are just another of the reasons why it seems to me that religions were made up by fallible human beings. Restrictions against eating pork, beef, or shellfish seem ridiculous. If I were a creator god that didn't want his creations to eat certain foods then I would have made those foods poisonous to eat.
     
  7. wizanda

    wizanda One Accepts All Religious Texts
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    Pufferfish is poisonous; yet people go out of there way to eat it... Fugu - Wikipedia

    If we were omnivores we should be able to eat raw meat, and yet fail.

    In my opinion
    . :innocent:
     
  8. Thief

    Thief Rogue Theologian

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    as I recall the scripture.....the first cup went to the governor of the wedding feast
    who then went to the groom saying.....
    Is it not customary to serve the best wine first?
    Why have you saved the best for last?

    can't fool a Jew with grape juice
    no slight of hand was seen by him
    no set up to convince him of what was in his cup

    So.....alcohol ok with the Carpenter?

    I believe so
     
  9. wizanda

    wizanda One Accepts All Religious Texts
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  10. Araceli Cianna

    Araceli Cianna Active Member

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    Well, since I am pagan, I try to eat as much whole foods as possible. I also try not to eat meat because of the way livestock is abused. Besides that, I have lactose intolerance so I avoid dairy too. So you can imagine my diet is mostly whole grains, vegetables, and nuts. It's not that I have to eat this way, just that I prefer to eat this way due to ethical, environmental, and personal health concerns. I think most religions see these kind of issues and incorporate them into their rules for similar reasons.
     
  11. Thief

    Thief Rogue Theologian

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    Oh.....!

    well if we get to pick and choose which piece of scripture we prefer......and we do.....

    I like John
     
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  12. Thief

    Thief Rogue Theologian

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    I've heard a radio news report about bread.

    Seems a factory has been set up to make bread ala .....kosher

    it's got machinery tech and a dogmatic rule
    (which I won't claim to understand)

    if it takes more than seventeen minutes from start to finish
    scrap all of it and clean the line.....
    all of it

    I don't keep kosher
     
  13. Thief

    Thief Rogue Theologian

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    I've heard a radio news report about bread.

    Seems a factory has been set up to make bread ala .....kosher

    it's got machinery tech and a dogmatic rule
    (which I won't claim to understand)

    if it takes more than seventeen minutes from start to finish
    scrap all of it and clean the line.....
    all of it

    I don't keep kosher
     
  14. Quintessence

    Quintessence Tale Weaver
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    Is your diet restricted by your religion or spirituality?

    Technically, no. Having such mandatory restrictions requires a certain degree of dogmatism that is by and large absent in contemporary Paganisms.

    That said, Pagan traditions are very way-of-life types of religions, meaning someone's dietary choices are going to be informed by their tradition. The direction this takes varies by tradition as well as personal interpretation.


    If so, what are you not permitted to eat? When are you not permitted to eat it? For what reason?

    The underlying idea that many contemporary Pagans use when considering dietary choices is respectfulness for the non-human world. For some, this means adhering to modern dietary trends. I personally find that a bit odd, especially after I did some more research on how indigenous cultures handled these things. Seeing something as sacred or as a person doesn't mean you don't eat it, but some contemporary Pagans draw just that conclusion.

    For me, it is less about what I eat than how it was produced. Because there is a very large disconnect between my standards and those of the designer/industrial food nation I live in, trying to clear that bar all at once is beyond overwhelming. Sanity demands indulgence tempered with mindfulness.


    What are the implications of breaking this diet?

    More than I care to think about. :sweat:
     
  15. Akivah

    Akivah Well-Known Member

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    There isn't much of a reason for freewill if failing to adhere to a commandment results in your death. G-d might as well have a commandment not to jump off a high cliff to fall onto sharp rocks.
     
  16. Akivah

    Akivah Well-Known Member

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    It was matzah. Also, as you're not Jewish, there is no reason for you to keep kosher. And seriously, do you really want to give up bacon cheeseburgers?
     
  17. Buddha Dharma

    Buddha Dharma Dharma Practitioner

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    Vegetarianism is strongly encouraged for Buddhists, but not mandatory. Although, I invite all lay Buddhists to think seriously about vegetarianism, because in countries where monks beg- the lay person's diet is the difference between them eating a sentient being that was slaughtered or not. The traditional texts are pretty clear that vegetarianism is ideal as the Buddha was concerned, since he thought willfully harming even bugs and microscopic life unnecessarily was destructive karma. I follow the traditional rule of no buying, prepping, or having another person make meat for me. However, if meat is made and offered to me, in spite of my not asking for it- like someone just offers as a gift of goodwill- I will take a little, so the animal's life wasn't wasted, and I don't snuff out the virtue of generosity. I am pretty well vegetarian because of being a Buddhist, yes. Though I had guilt about meat before I started to get more serious about it.
     
    #37 Buddha Dharma, Jan 16, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2018
  18. Buddha Dharma

    Buddha Dharma Dharma Practitioner

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    Additional note: Thich Naht Hanh has offered a thought for consideration by all lay Buddhists that vegetarianism is a form of non-violence (ahimsa) and setting oneself toward it as ideal.

    Also, I think as a lay Buddhist having a choice to eat meat or not, since I buy and prep all my food- is virtuous.
     
  19. Phantasman

    Phantasman Well-Known Member

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    I believe so also.

    Your quote comes from John as Jesus first miracle. He didn't heal, he merely amazed. The remark of the governor is to glorify that the works of Christ surpassed of those before him (OT). It is symbolic. The wine is unimportant.
    John:
    3 And when they wanted wine, the mother of Jesus saith unto him, They have no wine.
    4 Jesus saith unto her, Woman, what have I to do with thee? mine hour is not yet come.

    10 And saith unto him, Every man at the beginning doth set forth good wine; and when men have well drunk, then that which is worse: but thou hast kept the good wine until now.
    11 This beginning of miracles did Jesus in Cana of Galilee, and manifested forth his glory; and his disciples believed on him.

    Jesus is represented as the good wine. The wine he said was his blood that we must drink.

    Perspective. There is nothing wrong with drinking wine (in material). When Jesus knew his time was at hand, he fed the disciples wine to crush the blow of the event, and they even fell asleep, possibly from over consumption. Wine is use both materially and spiritually in the gospel. But Jesus spoke and taught spirit. It is through the Spirit we understand.

    My perspective after seeking the answers.
     
  20. QuestioningMind

    QuestioningMind Well-Known Member

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    Not sure what free will has to do with why God would create perfectly eatable plants/animals and then tell people that they aren't supposed to eat them. No clue whatsoever what you'ere trying to say in your second sentence.
     
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