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Prayer or Meditation in Your Religion or Worldview

Debater Slayer

Vipassana
Staff member
Premium Member
In some religions, prayer is a form of humbling oneself before a deity or deities, or sometimes ritually expressing obedience or loyalty to said deity or deities. In others, prayer or spiritual practice is more related to "oneness" or observing a connection between oneself and a god or gods, the latter possibly taking the form of nature or the universe.

What form does prayer or meditation take in your religion or worldview? What does it express?
 

Vinayaka

devotee
Premium Member
In some religions, prayer is a form of humbling oneself before a deity or deities, or sometimes ritually expressing obedience or loyalty to said deity or deities. In others, prayer or spiritual practice is more related to "oneness" or observing a connection between oneself and a god or gods, the latter possibly taking the form of nature or the universe.

What form does prayer or meditation take in your religion or worldview? What does it express?
I would use 'forms' rather than 'form'. There are many forms of prayer in Hinduism. Beseeching, thanking, honoring, reflecting, looking are all inner ideas. Externally it has more. Puja, japa, singing, penance, pilgrimage, dancing ..
 

sun rise

The world is on fire
Premium Member
We use verbal and visual meditations. Verbal meditation is to chant (sing) (repeat) a name of God. Visual meditation is to contemplate an image of the Divine.

An possible example is this video which puts both together.

 

Sand Dancer

Crazy Cat Lady
In some religions, prayer is a form of humbling oneself before a deity or deities, or sometimes ritually expressing obedience or loyalty to said deity or deities. In others, prayer or spiritual practice is more related to "oneness" or observing a connection between oneself and a god or gods, the latter possibly taking the form of nature or the universe.

What form does prayer or meditation take in your religion or worldview? What does it express?
It is used to calm the mind and body, as well as to improve memory.
 

Ella S.

Dispassionate Goth
In Stoicism, meditation is used to maintain a logical mind.

By that I am not referring to formal logic but a dispassionate state of mind unclouded by reactive emotional evaluations of the external world. It's used to refocus ourselves away from that which is not within our control and towards cultivating a sense of inner peace and clear-mindedness.

It's not meant to repress emotion, though, that's a popular misconception. It allows us to examine our emotions and where they come from without letting them make decisions for us.

From this state, we are better able to use logic to analyze the external world and compare the consequences of our potential actions, rather than being hastily carried away by momentary lapses of judgment.
 

Hamilton

Member
I express gratitude. There is more to be thankful for than to complain about. I don't complain

I might apologize for something even if I wasn't the one who did the apologendum. I don't make promises. I don't ask for favors.

I consider my morning readings to be the equivalent of prayer.
 

The Sum of Awe

Brought to you by the moment that spacetime began.
Expressing gratitude a lot of times. Sometimes I do ask for things. Sometimes I do complain and shout at God, but I think God understands that sometimes I just need to do that and that I still love and trust God.
 

mangalavara

सो ऽहम्
Premium Member
What form does prayer or meditation take in your religion or worldview? What does it express?

For me, ‘prayer’ is almost always asking for things such as dispassion and enlightenment and affirming my connection to Śivā and Śiva. This is expressed in mantras and ślokas such as the Pavamāna mantra, Rudra Gayatri mantra, and ‘Annapurne, Sadapurne’ verse. There is also japa or the repetition of divine names. Japa can be a meditative practice. I like to chant names of Śiva in the vocative case.

When it comes to meditation, I sit in sukhāsana with my eyes closed and mentally chant Om with each breath, in and out for at least 20 minutes each day. This is a new sādhanā or spiritual practice for me, and I’ve been doing it for 10 days so far. The purpose of this type of meditation is to realize Brahman, the ultimate Reality (with an uppercase r).
 
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