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Pauline and Petrine Privilege?

Discussion in 'Catholic DIR' started by 9-10ths_Penguin, Dec 21, 2009.

  1. 9-10ths_Penguin

    9-10ths_Penguin 1/10 Superstylin' Staff Member Premium Member

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    I was listening to a Q & A session on a Catholic talk radio show a few weeks ago and they mentioned "Pauline Privilege". I wasn't familiar with the term, so I Googled it. In the process, I also found out about "Petrine Privilege". Here's one explanation, courtesy the Archdiocese of Chicago:

    Now... I'm somewhat familiar with the Church's stance on marriage: I've read what the Catechism has to say on the subject, and I went through a Catholic marriage preparation course myself. The general theme that I took from this is that marriage, in the Catholic view, is a permanent, indissoluble bond in all cases, as long as there was a valid marriage in the first place.

    How does the Church reconcile this position with the ideas of Pauline and Petrine Privilege?
     
  2. Quiddity

    Quiddity UndertheInfluenceofGiants

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  3. 9-10ths_Penguin

    9-10ths_Penguin 1/10 Superstylin' Staff Member Premium Member

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    I'm okay with the distinction between annulment and divorce. That part I get.

    I quickly searched through the article, and the only mention I could find of Pauline Privilege called it "a type of annulment". But that's not correct, is it?

    From what I've read, and from what the host on the talk radio show that put this bee in my bonnet said, Pauline and Petrine Privilege are distinct from annulment, since in an annulment, the judgement of the Church is that a valid marriage was never present, while in the case of Pauline and Petrine Privilege, a valid marriage is recognized, but special permission is given to dissolve it. Am I right in this understanding?

    I looked through the Catechism sections on marriage, but they don't mention Pauline or Petrine Privilege at all. They do talk about the indissolubility of sacramental marriage, though... and while I might be able to understand an argument about Pauline Privilege being okay because it doesn't break a sacramental marriage (and therefore doesn't break a covenant with God, even if it could nominally be considered a form of divorce), I can't see how this could apply in the case of Petrine Privilege, since one of the members of the couple would be baptized.

    When I got married, the priest told my wife and I that because she's baptized and I'm not, our marriage would be a sacrament for her but not for me... is this incorrect? If it's true, I don't see how Petrine Privilege can be reconciled with the stuff in the Catechism about the indissolubility of the sacrament of marriage.

    I guess this is all my long-winded way of asking whether Pauline and Petrine Privilege are actually forms of annulment, or whether they do dissolve a valid marriage.
     
  4. Northern Papist

    Northern Papist Grand Inquisitor

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    This is one hell of a question. One I've never stumbled across before. I didn't even know about the Pauline and Petrine Privileges until I done a bit of research to answer your question.

    Just my luck.. :D!

    In the end though I found a source that can say it better than my self. I cannot link to the source though due to not having reached my 15 post-count.

     
  5. Northern Papist

    Northern Papist Grand Inquisitor

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    Christ's blessings, Mary's Prayers
    Northern Papist
     
  6. 9-10ths_Penguin

    9-10ths_Penguin 1/10 Superstylin' Staff Member Premium Member

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    Thanks, Northern Papist.

    It's this bit that has me confused:

    I'm confused because it seems to me to contradict what my wife's parish priest told us when we got married.

    Here's my situation: I'm unbaptized, my wife's a baptized Catholic who's gone through all the normal sacraments. After having our "petition for difference of cult" approved by the local bishop, we got married in a Catholic church in what the priest said was a sacramental marriage for her (because she's baptized) but a non-sacramental marriage for me (because I'm unbaptized).

    Now, I'm not worried about this happening, but would Petrine Privilege allow (with the Pope's approval, of course) my wife to have our marriage dissolved in the eyes of the Church? If so, was her priest wrong about our marriage being sacramental for her?

    Or is Petrine Privilege more about cases where the marriage isn't sacramental for either party... i.e. when a Catholic gets married outside the Church?
     
  7. URAVIP2ME

    URAVIP2ME Well-Known Member

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    1st Corinthians 7:13-15 If a woman has a husband that does not believe but is agreeable to live with her she should Not leave him. The unbelieving husband is sanctified by the wife.......If the unbeliever departs, let him depart.....

    Please notice there is nothing in Scripture about having marriage dissolved.
    See also Peter's words at 1st Peter 3:1-7.

    At Matthew (5:32; 19:9) The only reason Jesus gave for divorce was fornication. The reason the word adultery is not used is because fornication is more comprehensive. Fornication comes from the Greek word: porneia. Porneia includes all forms of illicit sexual relations outside of Scriptural marriage. (Lev 18:22,23; Rom 1:24-27; 1st Cor 6:9,10). Porneia is where the English word pornography comes. So the only thing that can Scripturally sever the marriage bond is porneia (fornication) in order to free the innocent one to divorce and marry again if desired.- 1st Cor 7:39.
     
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