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Our Inner Ark

Discussion in 'Religious Debates' started by Lightkeeper, Dec 27, 2004.

  1. Lightkeeper

    Lightkeeper Well-Known Member

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    If we assume that the Noah's Ark story depicts an inner process we go through it is interesting to try to figure what all of the symbols in the story mean.

    The Ark could be our consciousness as it stands now. The flood would be life's trials and tribulations, the rain could be stream of consciousness. The 2 of each kind animals could symbolize the union of negative and positive or the union of male and female in our consciousness. The end of the flood means we have reached higher ground or higher consciousness. The Dove brings an olive branch, what would that mean? How about the rainbow, what could that signify? Do you agree that this could be an inner journey or did the flood actually happen?
     
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  2. Sunstone

    Sunstone De Diablo Del Fora
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    I think that's a beautiful interpretation, Lightkeeper! Perhaps the Dove symbolizes achieving peace with ourselves, and the rainbow symbolizes that we are no longer seeing things as black and white, but in colors?
     
  3. chuck010342

    chuck010342 Active Member

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    Yeah it is. I love how your are open by saying that you assume.

    Or it could be a literal boat but if not literal then I see the Ark as Jesus.

    I see it as Gods Judgement on a sinful people

    I see the two animals to mean that God wanted life to continue after his judgement.

    I see that the Ressurection of the dead is end of the flood.

    That there will be everlasting peace and rightousness of the New Jeruselm

    YES
     
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  4. fromthe heart

    fromthe heart Well-Known Member

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    I believe the flood actually happened but I like your depiction...Dove with olive branch? contentment. Rainbow? Inner joy...like you feel when you see a rainbow
     
  5. chuck010342

    chuck010342 Active Member

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    Who left a comment on this post?
     
  6. Jayhawker Soule

    Jayhawker Soule <yawn> ignore </yawn>
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    Clearly we are dealing with allegory representing the efforts of the Sea Peoples who later played havoc with both West Semitic and Egyptian regimes. The animals represent those prisoners captured from each regional principality, the ravens the spies inserted into the lands of the Hittites, Hyksos, and Mitanni, and the doves the later diplomatic envoys who released the prisoners and secured access to the Levant.

    ... or, perhaps, the story is precisely as it appears: the redaction of a Summerian flood myth. While I can understand the desire to rescue Genesis from the taint of really bad fiction, that's really all we have going on here.
     
  7. chuck010342

    chuck010342 Active Member

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    No allegory the events of Noahs day actually happened.

    What we have here is the truth and the Summerians are the ones who have the redaction of the Genesis account. The only really bad fiction is your previous statement
     
  8. Feathers in Hair

    Feathers in Hair World's Tallest Hobbit

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    Since there are a number of flood myths worldwide, I would not post such an answer. I would also not do so in such an unkind manner.
     
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  9. chuck010342

    chuck010342 Active Member

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    The reason I post such an answer is because that what happened. And the reason I posted it that way is because he said the bible was bad fiction and that is insulting to me and my faith
     
  10. Feathers in Hair

    Feathers in Hair World's Tallest Hobbit

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    (Please forgive me for being off-topic, but I would like to see if I can avert disaster.)

    You are entitled to your beliefs, and should feel welcome to share them. The awkward thing on these forums is that, while the majority of RF is a gentle, peaceful environment, the debate section is where, if you make a statement, it is expected to be followed up by a logical explanation and, where appropriate, sources. (If most of RF is 'the kiddie pool', the Debates section is the shark tank.)

    If I'm interpreting the situation correctly, this is happening because your interpretation of Biblical scripture is conflicting with Deut. 32.8s' interpretation of it. As I said before, you are entitled to your beliefs, but so is he. That doesn't mean either of you is wrong or right, it simply means that if you want your argument to be seen as 'right', in the Debates section you're arguments will weigh more if you explain them, using terms that do not imply that other religions are not valid.)

    While I cannot and should not speak for another, I do not think Deut. 32.8s' statements were intended as a insult to you or your faith. A number of people here (of all faiths) on RF are comfortable with the concept that their religion is based upon a work that may or may not contain events that actually happened, or thing that people may have or may have not actually said. That is never meant to imply that these works and the people that choose to follow them are of any lesser value for it. I might have taken issue with the word 'bad', but I do not think the rest of it is insulting. If you would like to debate whether or not the events of the Bible (or any other work) are fictional, you can feel free to start another thread, of course.
     
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  11. chuck010342

    chuck010342 Active Member

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    I'm not whinning as feathers said so wonderfully You and I have different views and in the debate section is where we can discuss them. However if your not willing to give any evidence for what you believe then I don't feel that I'm obligated to give any evidence agianst your claims. I don't care if you disagree with me But I do care if you want to make a statement and I think its wrong I can say my rebutal so to speak.
     
  12. Jayhawker Soule

    Jayhawker Soule <yawn> ignore </yawn>
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    Of course you can, and with absolutely no offense taken. So, tell me, when was this Flood of yours?
     
  13. chuck010342

    chuck010342 Active Member

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    Do you want a specific date? Or a general date?
     
  14. Sunstone

    Sunstone De Diablo Del Fora
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    Here's a tough question for you. Lightkeeper began this thread by asking us to assume that Noah's flood was a metaphore for inner processes. Now here's the question: Can Noah's flood be both a metaphore for inner processes and a real event? If so, how would that change the meaning of Noah's Flood? If not, why not?
     
  15. Jayhawker Soule

    Jayhawker Soule <yawn> ignore </yawn>
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  16. painted wolf

    painted wolf Grey Muzzle

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    I think that the story of Noah's ark was a parable. It is a story about why one should place his trust in God dispite what others think of you. It also helps to reinforce the notion that humanity is dominate over the animals as it was up to the faith of one man to save all life on earth.

    Not that I agree with the story, but it is a valid religious tool for teaching such ideas.

    wa:do
     
  17. Feathers in Hair

    Feathers in Hair World's Tallest Hobbit

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    I'm very interested in the idea of the Ark as both a parable and an interpretation of real events. Would an event as horrific as a world-wide flood be remembered as an actual event, or would the event be eventually forgotten, but then used by some groups as a way of teaching their lessons to their offspring, knowing that some sort of racial memory of the event would reinforce those lessons? (I should say that, by 'racial,' I mean the human race, since so many different cultures seem to have a variation on the story.)
     
  18. Sunstone

    Sunstone De Diablo Del Fora
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    I'm not sure that I would personally subscribe to the notion that Noah's Flood was a real event, but if I did, then I would still wonder why it had been included in the bible? I would not think the mere fact it was a real event by itself warranted its inclusion in the bible. So, I would be looking for some sort of meaning that it might have. And I wouldn't just stop looking if all I found was an outward meaning, but would continue searching for what sort of inner meaning it also had. All of this assumes of course that I believed it to be a real event in the first place.
     
  19. Jayhawker Soule

    Jayhawker Soule <yawn> ignore </yawn>
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    Krakatoa : The Day the World Exploded: August 27, 1883 is an enthrawling book. I mention it here because the book discusses, in passing, the connection between that eruption and the rise of radical Islam in Indonesia. Religion is a search for meaning, and natural disasters which transcend understanding are fertile ground for myth creation.

    The Flood: Myth and Science gathers some interesting facts and observations.
     
  20. painted wolf

    painted wolf Grey Muzzle

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    I think that the flood event of the Black sea was the most likely source for a 'world swallowing' flood story. 7,500 years ago the Black sea was a large freashwater lake, with numerous settlements. Then in a sudden and catistrophic few days the land that seperated the Black sea from the Mediteranian collapsed and the ocean flooded the area for hundreds of miles. Estimates put the flood at filling in the Black sea to current levels at a rate of over 20 miles a day. All told it filled in the lake to an addtional 150 meters in depth.

    It wouldn't take much for the survivors tales of fleeing a massive flood to turn into a 'world distroying' flood over the cource of a few thousand years of re-telling.

    wa:do
     
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