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One of your favorite sutra verses

Discussion in 'Buddhism DIR' started by Unveiled Artist, Oct 24, 2015.

  1. Unveiled Artist

    Unveiled Artist Veteran Member

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    I know there are a thousand of sutras. I was wondering if you wanted to share some experts of some of the ones that inspirted you (among many).

    Here is one of mine.
    Lotus Sutra

    Nam.
    :leafwind:
     
    #1 Unveiled Artist, Oct 24, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2015
  2. Rick O'Shez

    Rick O'Shez Irishman bouncing off walls

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    I rather like this poem by Nyoshul Khen Rinpoche:

    Rest in natural great peace this exhausted mind,
    Beaten helpless by karma and neurotic thoughts
    Like the relentless fury of the pounding waves
    In the infinite ocean of samsara.
    Rest in natural great peace.
     
  3. Rick O'Shez

    Rick O'Shez Irishman bouncing off walls

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  4. Rick O'Shez

    Rick O'Shez Irishman bouncing off walls

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    "Now, Kalamas, don't go by reports, by legends, by traditions, by scripture, by logical conjecture, by inference, by analogies, by agreement through pondering views, by probability, or by the thought, 'This contemplative is our teacher.' When you know for yourselves that, 'These qualities are skillful; these qualities are blameless; these qualities are praised by the wise; these qualities, when adopted & carried out, lead to welfare & to happiness' — then you should enter & remain in them."

    From the Kalama Sutta
    http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an03/an03.065.than.html
     
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  5. crossfire

    crossfire Antinomian feminist heretic freak ☿
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    From the Kalama Sutta: the portion of the sutta that shows that once your mind is devoid of the three poisons, (greed, hatred, delusion,) you will radiate the four sublime states (link) to all beings in all directions:


    "Now, Kalamas, one who is a disciple of the noble ones — thus devoid of greed, devoid of ill will, undeluded, alert, & resolute — keeps pervading the first direction [the east] — as well as the second direction, the third, & the fourth — with an awareness imbued with good will (Pali-metta). Thus he keeps pervading above, below, & all around, everywhere & in every respect the all-encompassing cosmos with an awareness imbued with good will: abundant, expansive, immeasurable, free from hostility, free from ill will.

    "He keeps pervading the first direction — as well as the second direction, the third, & the fourth — with an awareness imbued with compassion.(Pali-karuna) Thus he keeps pervading above, below, & all around, everywhere & in every respect the all-encompassing cosmos with an awareness imbued with compassion: abundant, expansive, immeasurable, free from hostility, free from ill will.

    "He keeps pervading the first direction — as well as the second direction, the third, & the fourth — with an awareness imbued with appreciation.(Pali-mudita) Thus he keeps pervading above, below, & all around, everywhere & in every respect the all-encompassing cosmos with an awareness imbued with appreciation: abundant, expansive, immeasurable, free from hostility, free from ill will.

    "He keeps pervading the first direction — as well as the second direction, the third, & the fourth — with an awareness imbued with equanimity.(Pali-upekkha) Thus he keeps pervading above, below, & all around, everywhere & in every respect the all-encompassing cosmos with an awareness imbued with equanimity: abundant, expansive, immeasurable, free from hostility, free from ill will.​
     
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  6. Unveiled Artist

    Unveiled Artist Veteran Member

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    Analysis of the Eightfold Path

    "At Sāvatthī. “Bhikkhus, I will teach you the Noble Eightfold Path and I will analyse it for you. Listen to that and attend closely, I will speak.”

    “Yes, venerable sir,” those bhikkhus replied. The Blessed One said this:

    “And what, bhikkhus, is the Noble Eightfold Path? Right view … right concentration.

    “And what, bhikkhus, is right view? Knowledge of suffering, knowledge of the origin of suffering, [9] knowledge of the cessation of suffering, knowledge of the way leading to the cessation of suffering: this is called right view.

    “And what, bhikkhus, is right intention? Intention of renunciation, intention of non-ill will, intention of harmlessness: this is called right intention.

    “And what, bhikkhus, is right speech? Abstinence from false speech, abstinence from divisive speech, abstinence from harsh speech, abstinence from idle chatter: this is called right speech.

    “And what, bhikkhus, is right action? Abstinence from the destruction of life, abstinence from taking what is not given, abstinence from sexual misconduct: this is called right action.

    “And what, bhikkhus, is right livelihood? Here a noble disciple, having abandoned a wrong mode of livelihood, earns his living by a right livelihood: this is called right livelihood.

    “And what, bhikkhus, is right effort? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu generates desire for the nonarising of unarisen evil unwholesome states; he makes an effort, arouses energy, applies his mind, and strives. He generates desire for the abandoning of arisen evil unwholesome states…. He generates desire for the arising of unarisen wholesome states…. He generates desire for the maintenance of arisen wholesome states, for their nondecay, increase, expansion, and fulfilment by development; he makes an effort, arouses energy, applies his mind, and strives. This is called right effort.

    “And what, bhikkhus is right mindfulness? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells contemplating the body in the body, ardent, clearly comprehending, mindful, having removed covetousness and displeasure in regard to the world. He dwells contemplating feelings in feelings, ardent, clearly comprehending, mindful, having removed covetousness and displeasure in regard to the world. He dwells contemplating mind in mind, ardent, [10] clearly comprehending, mindful, having removed covetousness and displeasure in regard to the world. He dwells contemplating phenomena in phenomena, ardent, clearly comprehending, mindful, having removed covetousness and displeasure in regard to the world. This is called right mindfulness.

    “And what, bhikkhus, is right concentration? Here, bhikkhus, secluded from sensual pleasures, secluded from unwholesome states, a bhikkhu enters and dwells in the first jhāna, which is accompanied by thought and examination, with rapture and happiness born of seclusion. With the subsiding of thought and examination, he enters and dwells in the second jhāna, which has internal confidence and unification of mind, is without thought and examination, and has rapture and happiness born of concentration. With the fading away as well of rapture, he dwells equanimous and, mindful and clearly comprehending, he experiences happiness with the body; he enters and dwells in the third jhāna of which the noble ones declare: ‘He is equanimous, mindful, one who dwells happily.’ With the abandoning of pleasure and pain, and with the previous passing away of joy and displeasure, he enters and dwells in the fourth jhāna, which is neither painful nor pleasant and includes the purification of mindfulness by equanimity. This is called right concentration.”
    ~Samyutta Nikaya Sutra

    Here are some link suttas. First time I've read this site:
    https://suttacentral.net/sn
     
  7. Banjankri

    Banjankri Active Member

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    The Buddha next asked Mañjuśrī, “Why is not abiding in dharmas called abiding in prajñā-pāramitā?”
    Mañjuśrī replied, “Not abiding in appearances is abiding in prajñā-pāramitā.”
    The Buddha next asked Mañjuśrī, “As one abides in prajñā-pāramitā in this way, do one’s roots of goodness increase or decrease?”
    Mañjuśrī replied, “As one abides in prajñā-pāramitā in this way, one’s roots of goodness neither increase nor decrease, all dharmas neither increase nor decrease, and the nature and appearance of prajñā-pāramitā neither increase nor decrease. World-Honored One, practicing prajñā-pāramitā in this way, one neither abandons the dharma of ordinary beings nor grasps the dharma of sages and holy beings. Why not? Because as one practices prajñā-pāramitā, one does not see any dharma that can be grasped or abandoned. Moreover, practicing prajñā-pāramitā in this way, one sees neither saṁsāra to dislike nor nirvāṇa to like. Why not? Because one does not even see saṁsāra, much less dislike it, and because one does not even see nirvāṇa, much less like it. Practicing prajñā-pāramitā in this way, one sees neither afflictions to abandon nor merits to grasp. One’s mind neither increases nor decreases with respect to all dharmas. Why not? Because one sees neither increase nor decrease in the dharma realm. World-Honored One, training in this way is called practicing prajñā-pāramitā.

    Mahāprajñāpāramitā Mañjuśrīparivarta Sūtra
     
  8. dyanaprajna2011

    dyanaprajna2011 Dharmapala

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    Right now, I'm engrossed in the study of the Satipatthana Sutta (MN 10), particularly, the cemetery contemplations. It's not for the faint of heart, or the fearful.
     
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  9. Rick O'Shez

    Rick O'Shez Irishman bouncing off walls

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    MN10 is a pivotal text with regards to practice - lots of material to work with there! ;)
    https://suttacentral.net/en/mn10
     
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  10. von bek

    von bek Well-Known Member

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    Too many good choices! I think I will share this discourse, where the Buddha speaks at length on consciousness.

    From the Mahatanhasankhaya Sutta from the Majjhima Nikaya (MN38) http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.038.than.html

    From the same discourse:
    The main takeaway is the understanding that consciousness is something that arises due to causes and conditions. We see the Buddha harshly rebuke a disciple who tried to make consciousness into something more.
     
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  11. Rick O'Shez

    Rick O'Shez Irishman bouncing off walls

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    People love to reify consciousness. ;)
     
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  12. Unveiled Artist

    Unveiled Artist Veteran Member

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    To tell you honestly, I don't know what consciousness means at all from the Buddha's perspective. When I think consciousness, I think awareness (as in responsive) to verbal and physical stimuli. Our conscious refers to our awareness of thoughts.

    Any other definition goes over my head. According to what you post, is consciousness like the Law of Causality? I know that was mentioned "causes and conditions" but, still, it's confusing.
     
  13. von bek

    von bek Well-Known Member

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    What the Buddha is saying is that consciousness is awareness of sense objects. Nothing more, nothing less. Consciousness, like the other aggregates, is dependently arisen. In the case of consciousness, it arises from the contact of the sense bases (eye, ear, nose, tongue, body, and mind) with their respective sense objects (visual forms, sounds, odors, tastes, tactile sensations, and mental activity). In the sutta I shared, the Buddha rebukes one of his disciples, Sati, for claiming that consciousness is the speaker or the doer. In other words, Sati is suggesting that consciousness is what we truly are. This is not what the Buddha teaches. We are no more our consciousness than we are our body.
     
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  14. Unveiled Artist

    Unveiled Artist Veteran Member

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    Ooh. Here is another one from Nichiren Shonin. He talks about the Lotus Sutra. Entry October 27.

    "Thr function of fire is to burn and give light. The function of water is to wash away filth. The winds blow away dust and breathe life into plants, animals, and human beings. The earth produces the grasses and trees, and heaven (sky/clouds) provides moisture. Thr five characters of Myoho Renge Kyo (Mystic Law of the Lotus Sutra) are also like that. They are the cluster of blessings brought by Bodhisattvas of the Eartg, disciples of the Buddba in his true identity"

    -WND 218 The Heritage of the Ultimate Law of Life.
     
  15. Unveiled Artist

    Unveiled Artist Veteran Member

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    @von bek

    What the Buddha is saying is that consciousness is awareness of sense objects. What are sense objects? Objects that we know by our five sense? Nothing more, nothing less. Consciousness, like the other aggregates, is dependently arisen. In the case of consciousness, it arises from the contact of the sense bases (eye, ear, nose, tongue, body, and mind) with their respective sense objects (visual forms, sounds, odors, tastes, tactile sensations, and mental activity). You'd have to rephrase this.

    In the sutta I shared, the Buddha rebukes one of his disciples, Sati, for claiming that consciousness is the speaker or the doer. In other words, Sati is suggesting that consciousness is what we truly are. This is not what the Buddha teaches. We are no more our consciousness than we are our body.

    The best I can trasnlate this is consciousness is the awareness of objects that we detect with our five senses using ears, eyes, and so forth. When our sense make our conscious aware of it's presence, then our conscious becomes known to us (arise?) or we become conciously aware of it.

    Sati confused what part of us experiene awareness by refering to the cause (the doer or speaker) rather than the senses which is not the doer but just the cause.

    So, in other layman words, the cause (our senses) makes the affect (awareness), and all of this is cause and affect defines the "motor" of our conscious?

    Outside of that, I am completely lost. The Buddha's words are somewhat hard to descipher especially when trying toapply it to real life situations rather than only philsophical wonderings.

     
  16. von bek

    von bek Well-Known Member

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    As a quick example, I will use only use ear consciousness to illustrate what I'm saying.

    Someone knocks at your door. The knocking is the ear or auditory sense object. When the sound wave from that knocking reaches your ear, that is contact between the sense base (the ear) and the sense object, (the knocking). When there is contact between these two, ear or auditory consciousness arises in dependence on them. This sound consciousness persists as long as the sound wave is impacting the ear, when it ceases, the sound consciousness ceases.
     
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  17. Unveiled Artist

    Unveiled Artist Veteran Member

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    ooh. .huh! then why didn't you say so, lol. Conscious sounds similar to awareness. I understand what you mean. Let me see if I can plug it in with your former post.

    Thanks!
     
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