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On attachment to perspectives and the many ways in which it can be harmful

Discussion in 'General Religious Debates' started by LuisDantas, Oct 18, 2019.

  1. LuisDantas

    LuisDantas Aura of atheification
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    A few recent threads put me thinking about how often people end up weaponizing their own beliefs and their own inability to deal with disagreements and challenges to their views.

    There is a saying attributed to Oprah:

    "Don't back down just to keep the peace. Standing up for your belief builds self-confidence and self-esteem."

    I happen to agree, but there are of course situations when one shold back down, consider whether he or she has enough self-confidence already, and/or choose something else over building self-esteem. A balance should be pursued, and to decide which it should be can be a considerable challenge in and of itself.

    It can be difficult, even hazardous, to make concessions for other people. There are comfort and tranquility in being in environments that do not see fit to pay attention to alternate viewpoints. It is entirely conceivable that one may end up reliant on those environments to the point of being literally sick, oblivious or utterly confused when exposed to even the general lines of other perspectives when the time comes to leave the echo chamber. Worse still, the person may well fail to realize how out of touch he or she is exactly.

    Which is precisely why leave the chamber we all should, often and sincerely. There are bitter findings to be attained on the outside, but turning our backs to them solves nothing. Besides, many of those findings are liberating and very gratifying indeed once we learn to deal with them.

    What can be somewhat less obvious is that over-reliance on predictable, safe environments imposes a toll on those from the outside as well. People who are lacking in familiarity with a wider range of environments will often develop a genuine difficulty to both understand other people and to make themselves truly understood.

    That is never a good thing, although it can be tempting in certain circunstances. It is just too easy to end up creating fictional versions of unconfortable people and other aspects of reality and convincing ourselves that they are faithful enough to the real thing. While the spurring factor may be a very sincere and genuine disconfort, the end result is far too often an effective weaponization of that disconfort into some form of "need" for confrontation of some form, often joined with some degree of expectation of lasting removal of the dissenting elements.

    Worse still, the occurrence of aggressive response to disconfort tends to be a self-fulfilling prophecy and to cause comparable yet opposite reaction. It is just not nearly as easy to have genuine good will and cooperation with someone who has lost the cool than with someone who has not.

    Everyone longs for comfort and acceptance. But perhaps paradoxically, to care for those we have to dare to transcend the need for them.
     
  2. PureX

    PureX Veteran Member

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    Most humans are running on 'autopilot' most of the time. They automatically steer to maintain their present course, regardless of where it comes from or where it's taking them. They would rather stay with what they know no matter how wrong it is than face the magnitude of what they don't know, and the profound vulnerability that illuminates.
     
  3. Terry Sampson

    Terry Sampson ζει

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  4. sun rise

    sun rise "Let there be peace and love among all"
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    To me there's a balance. I can (and do) stick up for my beliefs and express them as well as I can. But I also try to be sensitive to not carrying on a discussion further than is productive. And there are times, albeit rarely, where someone has made such a good case for their understanding that I change my mind (I know this is shocking and almost inhuman).
     
  5. Nakosis

    Nakosis crystal soldier
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    Sometimes what I like to do is argue for and try to support an opposing position.

    It's informative, while researching support, and provides a different perspective. Started in High School on a debate team. First arguing against the death penalty then against it. Interestingly, I was able to persuade the same group both for and against the death penalty. Of course we were teenagers, so likely not as steadfast in our opinions.
     
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  6. Brickjectivity

    Brickjectivity Veteran Member
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    What I gather is that sticking firmly to one's own opinions can blind one, but sometimes that is needful. Therefore people should not abandon our own opinions, but we should train our ability in doing so. There is a really awful cliche for this, and people here sometimes say "Keep an open mind, but don't let your brains fall out." Is this similar to what you are suggesting?
     
  7. LuisDantas

    LuisDantas Aura of atheification
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    Yes, this sounds just about right.

    But I also think that there is significant contemplation for one to engage in regarding these matters. To an extent it is an art to be developed, a very necessary practical skill to achieve proficiency at.
     
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  8. icehorse

    icehorse Well-Known Member
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    And of course one ought to behave one way in a formal debate, and quite another in day-to-day life.
     
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