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Noah's Ark Found

Discussion in 'Biblical Debates' started by Doktormartini, Jun 29, 2006.

  1. Doktormartini

    Doktormartini 小虎

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    Apparently people searching in Iran have found what they believe to be Noah's Ark.

    http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/story?id=2133311&page=1

    What do you think?

    I personally think it's fake because I don't believe that story every happened. It could easily be any other ship or something, or even someone could have done this just as a set up. You never know...

    Quote
    B.A.S.E officials concede that there would be no way to conclusively prove that their finding is actually Noah's Ark.
    Exactly, it's not like The Bible gives us a picture or even a vivid description of the Ark, so no one will know.

    P.S. Sorry if this is in the wrong section!
     
  2. Melody

    Melody Well-Known Member

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    And this is how you shall make it: The length of the ark shall be three hundred cubits, its width fifty cubits, and its height thirty cubits. You shall make a window for the ark, and you shall finish it to a cubit from above; and set the door of the ark in its side. You shall make it with lower, second, and third decks.
    Genesis 6:15-16

     
  3. kai

    kai ragamuffin

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    unless they find the captains log this wont prove anything, it may even be the ark of Uta-Napishtim
     
  4. gnostic

    gnostic The Lost One

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    I think they need to be tested, before this so-called "Ark" can be conclusive called "Noah's Ark". The last time that claim was made (at Mt Ararat), the people involved got burnt. It turned out to be a fake.

    I am not holding my breath.

    Or his original Sumerian counter-part - Ziusudra.
     
  5. kai

    kai ragamuffin

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    i have not heard of Ziusudra, is this older than the epic of gilgamesh?
     
  6. gnostic

    gnostic The Lost One

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    All Sumerian literature are older than the Babylonian version.

    But yes, Ziusudra (Sumerian) = Atrahasis (Akkadian) = Uta-Napishtim (Babylonian).
     
  7. kai

    kai ragamuffin

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    thanks i will look that up ,
     
  8. Smoke

    Smoke Done here.

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    From the homepage of BASE Institute:
    [FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]The Bible Archaeology, Search & Exploration (B.A.S.E.) Institute is dedicated to the quest for archaeological evidence to help validate to the world that the Bible is true, and that it represents an accurate, non-fictional account of God’s will to bring the people of this world back into relationship with Him.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]
    [/FONT][FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]BASE Institute fulfills its mission by engaging in activities of research, exploration & public education, to present credible archaeological information that is sound in scholarship, but also interesting and motivational to the general public.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]In other words, BASE Institute is not a scholarly institute, and is not engaged in serious archaeology or serious scholarship of any kind. BASE is a cheerleading squad for biblical inerrantists and is only interested in scraping up whatever "evidence" can be construed to support their own foregone conclusions.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]Bob Cornuke, the president of BASE Institute, is not an archaeologist and does not have a real college degree. (He does have a Ph.D. from Louisiana Baptist University, an unaccredited Christian diploma mill.) A former cop, he describes himself as "an [/FONT]international explorer and author[FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]" and explains that he got into the archaeology bidness after being hired to provide security for James Irwin's attempts to locate Noah's Ark in Turkey. (See Cornuke's bio on the BASE website.)[/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]In other words, there's absolutely no reason to take BASE seriously, and ABC was remiss publishing this story without, apparently, doing any research at all beyond talking to somebody from BASE.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]But judge for yourself: Do this look convincing to you?
    [/FONT]
     
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  9. kai

    kai ragamuffin

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    shaotr answer no
     
  10. LongGe123

    LongGe123 Active Member

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    Thing is though, even if they prove that this ark is the one from the Bible story - it doesn't actually prove anything. When you think about it, it doesn't PROVE the Bible right, because even if there was some guy called Noah who built a massive boat around that time, can it be proven that it was filled with animals and used in a catastrophic flood? Also, when exactly was that time? Also, it doesn't prove anything about the existence of God, since well....Noah could just be some crackpot who thought God told him to build a boat, so he did, but it turned out he was just nuts and so he never needed or used the boat as a result.

    See what I'm getting at?

    No amount of rotten wood you find on a mountain side is going to convince me that some Bible story is true.
     
  11. Jaymes

    Jaymes The cake is a lie

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    It seems to me that someone "finds" the ark every year or two. I remember consistently hearing new stories about this growing up. How many times are we going to "find" it? :areyoucra
     
  12. ChrisP

    ChrisP Veteran Member

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    As many times as it takes until it's "found" :D

    But seriously, even if there is an Ark... what does it prove?
     
  13. robtex

    robtex Veteran Member

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    If you ask the christian institutions who "research" this stuff I am guessing they are going to say "it depends on what your definition of find is?":rolleyes:
     
  14. Quiddity

    Quiddity UndertheInfluenceofGiants

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    You can find God's toe nail and it still won't prove diddly squat to those who function solely on the emperical plane. Although it will tell us that God is hygienic.:D

    It really wouldn't make a difference to me if they found it or not.
     
  15. uruk

    uruk Member

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    Could we ever find God's toe nail since he's a spirit? :D

    We couldn't find Jesus' toe nail due to his ressurection. So we're out of luck there. (I'm sorry, couldn't resist. I'm just playin' with ya).

    In seriousness, though, *proving* anything biblical on an "emperical plane" is a very high hurddle to jump. I guess that's why it all takes faith.

    As for sound archeology . . . . well here's what the end of that ABC article says:


    ABC, in my opinion, didn't care much about the implications of this story except that it catches eyes of readers.

    But, archeological findings are sometimes labled too hastily. I've read that stables were found in Meggdio and other parts of ancient Canaan and Israel. Everyone jumped to conclustions that they belong to Solomon. My bible's arceological supplument even has this discovery listed as "Solomon's stables". But, after a little more research and testing, the stables only dated back to King Ahab. Well, what's the deal with that? Ahab is in the bible, too right? But, the original discovers assumed the stables belonged to Solomon based only on biblical accounts. The stables were a testement to Solomon's wealth. Turns out, it was a testament to Ahab's military prowess (other kings in extrabiblical writings metion Ahab's chariots of war). So, redating the stables was a bummer for those who were excited about their original finding.

    Something similar might happen with the material thought to be the ark.
     
  16. dan

    dan Well-Known Member

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    Looks cool to me, but I was unaware that you had to have a genuine Ph.D. or else you were not allowed to be taken seriously.

    Why don't people just let the evidence speak for itself rather than use credentials to determine the veracity of anyone's claims?
     
  17. sandy whitelinger

    sandy whitelinger Veteran Member

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    I was only aware of them nailing His hands and feet not His toes.
     
  18. Smoke

    Smoke Done here.

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    I don't think you do. I certainly don't have one, and I've always thought a lot of Barbara W. Tuchman's work. Tuchman had a B.A. but no advanced degree, and was not a professional academic. No biggie. However, I do think it tells you a little something about somebody's approach to things when he equips himself with a bogus Ph.D. -- particularly since, in the case of Cornuke, he apparently didn't even bother to get a bonus B.A. first.

    More to the point, though, is the fact that Cornuke has no real training in archaeology. He is -- by his own account -- an "explorer."
     
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  19. Rejected

    Rejected Under Reconstruction

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    Well, let’s look at it this way.

    The remains of the "ark" were found at 13000 feet. First of all, let’s make the assumption that it is
    1) A boat of some sort.
    2) Not placed there as part of a hoax.

    The Earth has a volume of 259,874,998,617 (259+ billion) cubic miles at sea level

    There is only about 326 Million Cubic miles of water on the planet to begin with
    http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/earthhowmuch.html

    In order for a boat to run aground at an elevation of 13000 there would have to be an additional 353 million cubic miles of water covering the planet.

    You would have to more than double the earth’s current water supply. It’s impossible.
     
  20. Faint

    Faint Well-Known Member

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    Haha...that's great. Yeah, I'm an explorer too! Why? Well, I go hiking once in a while. By the same reasoning of this Ph.D. issue, I'm also an officially ordained minister (since I spent two minutes here http://www.ulc.org/ ) which makes me more qualified by most to discuss religion.:D

    This is just another example of the bible thumpers trying to support their claims with real-world "evidence". But as someone alread mentioned, it's useless because even if they found a boat with a man's skeleton and a name tag that says "Hi my name is: Noah" it still proves nothing of the validity of the bible. It's shady business. Makes me think the religion is getting desperate for new recruits.
     
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