1. Welcome to Religious Forums, a friendly forum to discuss all religions in a friendly surrounding.

    Your voice is missing! You will need to register to get access to the following site features:
    • Reply to discussions and create your own threads.
    • Our modern chat room. No add-ons or extensions required, just login and start chatting!
    • Access to private conversations with other members.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon!

Martial arts and Dharmic faith

Discussion in 'Dharmic Religions DIR' started by MD, Sep 27, 2015.

  1. MD

    MD qualiaphile

    Joined:
    May 5, 2012
    Messages:
    4,159
    Ratings:
    +1,742
    Religion:
    Zoroastrian
    I have noticed that several martial arts emphasize meditation as a big part of training, especially one you advance far enough. To train the mind is to train the body.

    Why does Buddhism have a much stronger influence on martial arts? Why didn't Hindu or Sikh martial forms disseminate more widely in the world than Buddhist influence far eastern ones?
     
  2. Satyamavejayanti

    Satyamavejayanti Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2011
    Messages:
    2,076
    Ratings:
    +829
    Religion:
    Sanatana Dharmah
    Namaste,

    As Buddhism traveled the world and took with it the Dahramah of Gautama, so did the monks also take with them the Indian cultural aspects, one of which was martial arts, one at the time would have been Kalari from the south, mixing these with the traditional arts of the rest of Asia gives us the diverse forms of Martial arts we see today.

    I am aware of one such art form from Hinduism that can be considered "Hindu", per say, which is kalari.

    Here is a link.
    http://www.kalari.in/kalaripayattu.htm

    Legend has it that ParsuRam who was well versed in Dhanur Veda, moved to South India and then set up the Kalari warriors there.
    also the Dhanur Veda itself is testimony to the Weapon technology available to the Kshatryas.

    During the British rule, Kalari was banned and only recently has re-emerged in the Southern areas. I doubt that many Indians are aware of this type of art, let alone try to market it to the rest of the world.

    Dhanyavad
     
  3. MD

    MD qualiaphile

    Joined:
    May 5, 2012
    Messages:
    4,159
    Ratings:
    +1,742
    Religion:
    Zoroastrian
    Thanks for this, I was always curious as to why Buddhism is so pervasive in every global martial art, from Muay Thai to Judo to Taekwando.

    Are there martial forms of yoga?
     
  4. Twilight Hue

    Twilight Hue The gentle embrace of twilight has become my guide

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2009
    Messages:
    31,944
    Ratings:
    +12,920
    Religion:
    Philosophical Buddhism
    I'd say Taoism is more attuned with martial arts than Buddhism. Likely Shaolin from David Carradine fame as grasshopper. That's not to say Buddhism and martial arts couldn't coincide but seems more attuned with harmony and balance in nature.
     
  5. MD

    MD qualiaphile

    Joined:
    May 5, 2012
    Messages:
    4,159
    Ratings:
    +1,742
    Religion:
    Zoroastrian
    Kung Fu is quite different from Muay Thai and they both have a strong Buddhist influence.
     
  6. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Be your own guru

    Joined:
    May 5, 2007
    Messages:
    24,507
    Ratings:
    +10,406
    Religion:
    Atheist, Advaita (Non-duality), Orthodox Hindu
    India has a very strong tradition of wrestling and indigenous gyms (akharas). We also have a very strong tradition of fighting with bamboo sticks (Latthabazi). They said an adept can keep away 200 people. But these traditions have diminished with the Western influence. Sikhs also have their traditions of using various weapons in a fight, but that is now reduced to just a show during religious processions. Who needs them in the age of automatic pistols, grenades and Kalashnikovs? Urbanization does not have space for these traditional arts. Akharas do not need costly equipment and suit the Indian needs. I hope the government will encourage them.

    Poor men's gyms (Akharas), some medal winners, Lathis (Bamboo sticks - normally used by police, but in hands of villagers also it becomes a deadly weapon).

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  7. Satyamavejayanti

    Satyamavejayanti Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2011
    Messages:
    2,076
    Ratings:
    +829
    Religion:
    Sanatana Dharmah
    Namaste,

    Yoga as a practice is used in Kalari and other forms or art, to not only make the body flexible but to calm the mind. The training of the various martial arts warriors are in itself a type of Yoga.

    Dhanyavad
     
  8. MD

    MD qualiaphile

    Joined:
    May 5, 2012
    Messages:
    4,159
    Ratings:
    +1,742
    Religion:
    Zoroastrian
    Cool, does Pehlwani use any dharmic principles in its practice?
     
  9. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Be your own guru

    Joined:
    May 5, 2007
    Messages:
    24,507
    Ratings:
    +10,406
    Religion:
    Atheist, Advaita (Non-duality), Orthodox Hindu
    The wrestlers are learners/students. So therefore, they should focus only on body building and techniques of wrestling. They are supposed to keep away from sex, films, smoking, alcohol or any other thing which distracts them from their purpose. They should be 'brahmacharis' (celibates). And their teachers/gurus keep a sharp eye on them, if required, even punishing them physically. In Indian context, it is considered perfectly OK. So, every gym has many inspiring idols/images. It could be Gods and Goddesses or mythological/historical heroes and fighters for Indian independence. But Lord Hanuman is a universal favorite. The first image is that of Guru Hanuman, the most respected and successful trainer during the recent times whose students won many medals for India. Guru Hanuman dedicated his life to wrestling, was a celibate, and died in 1999 at the age of 98.

    [​IMG] [​IMG][​IMG]
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    http://publishing.cdlib.org/ucpressebooks/view?docId=ft6n39p104&brand=ucpress
     
    #9 Aupmanyav, Sep 30, 2015
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2015
  10. Satyamavejayanti

    Satyamavejayanti Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2011
    Messages:
    2,076
    Ratings:
    +829
    Religion:
    Sanatana Dharmah
    Namaste,

    I think Aup has provided enough information on the pahalwans, as for Kalari it is said that their Isht Devi is Kali, but depends on the individual Kalaries, some may have other devis and devtas that they worship.

    Dhanyavad
     
  11. dyanaprajna2011

    dyanaprajna2011 Dharmapala

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2010
    Messages:
    5,561
    Ratings:
    +546
    Religion:
    Buddhism
    First off, I would hesitate to call any martial art 'Buddhist'. While there are many martial arts that either took from Buddhist philosophy or incorporates some of it's practices, there's nothing I would call an actual Buddhist martial art. With that being said, the popularity of both Buddhism and perceived Buddhist martial arts can be explained by several phenomena. During the 19th century, eastern religions began disseminating to the west, and Hinduism, Buddhism, and Taoism became the most popular. This is due to several things: 1. Various occult and esoteric groups were heavily inspired by them, particularly Theosophy and American transcendentalism, 2. Their scriptures were seen to be more in line with the findings of science, 3. As such, their scriptures were more readily available in western languages, and gave people looking for an alternative form of spirituality something to follow, 4. Because of these, Buddhism, with it's lack of emphasis on a creator god, gained in popularity, 5. This led to an interest in the cultures that were inspired by Buddhism, especially Chinese and Japanese, 6. World events at that time, and later, were the reasons why these two cultures were more popular, 7. Which led in an interest in their forms of martial arts, 8. Which eventually led to the idealizing and commercializing of these arts, particularly Kung Fu and Karate.
     
  12. satyaroop

    satyaroop Active Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2013
    Messages:
    253
    Ratings:
    +40
    As I understand ,after 12 years of studying kalari under the guru/teacher, advanced techniques are taught including knowledge of body-points(and other mystical aspects of the art), one strike at these points can supposedly cause great trauma even death, so the student's personality is gauged by the teacher to determine if he/she is mature enough to receive such knowledge , hence the secrecy I guess

    Another martial art In South India is silambam, check it out on YouTube
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Be your own guru

    Joined:
    May 5, 2007
    Messages:
    24,507
    Ratings:
    +10,406
    Religion:
    Atheist, Advaita (Non-duality), Orthodox Hindu
    That is 'latthabazi' of North India and they say that a champion 'lathait' (practitioner of the art) can fight against 200 people.
     
  14. crossfire

    crossfire Antinomian feminist heretic freak ☿
    Premium Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2012
    Messages:
    11,769
    Ratings:
    +4,647
    Religion:
    ☿ Mercuræn Mahayana Buddhist & Pastafarian
    One other possible reason why Buddhism might be popular with Martial Arts centers: is it wise to train young men (and women) to be lethal fighters without some sort of philosophical/moral training to go along with it? I would say the "compassion towards all beings" and "control of emotions" approach of Buddhism is a very good idea when it come to martial arts training. (Just sayin') ;)
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Be your own guru

    Joined:
    May 5, 2007
    Messages:
    24,507
    Ratings:
    +10,406
    Religion:
    Atheist, Advaita (Non-duality), Orthodox Hindu
    IMHO, it was a wise step. Indian physical training was never without it. So that when they become strong, they should not suppress the weak and help the weak in trouble. That is why all those Gods and Goddesses in an Indian gym. The practitioners were supposed to develop into protectors of the society.
     
    • Like Like x 1
Loading...