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Featured If the Abrahamic faiths are culturally designated, where do I fit in?

Discussion in 'Religious Debates' started by Epic Beard Man, May 21, 2019.

  1. Tumah

    Tumah Veteran Member

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    Is that true, or do we simply absorb the values of the society we live in? And if we are simply absorbing those values, does that mean what we have is an innate capacity to know right from wrong or an innate capacity to know what it acceptable and what is not acceptable?
     
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  2. metis

    metis aged ecumenical anthropologist

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    IMO, learning right from wrong is likely both cultural and genetic, so I don't tend to think if it in either/or terms.

    We are "social animals", and as such there tends to be sort of genetic "pecking order" that is likely in our genes, but it's likely "vague" enough whereas there can be a lot of leeway.
     
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  3. Muffled

    Muffled Jesus in me

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    I believe you are in error. Christianity is not limited to a culture. It does have cultural roots but those are not necessary to the essence of the religion. However sometimes people of different cultures hang on to false concepts of their culture. I believe if the Holy Spirit is really working in a person those false concepts would be eliminated. Even in America the Afro-American culture exists within the Christian church and it is different from English culture.
     
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  4. Muffled

    Muffled Jesus in me

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    I believe Jesus is not just a Jewish guy but is God incarnate. Everyone has to recognize God no matter what culture they come from.
     
  5. Muffled

    Muffled Jesus in me

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    I believe it matters not how God fits into a person's view but how a person fits into God's view.
     
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  6. Epic Beard Man

    Epic Beard Man Bearded Philosopher

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    But I would've thought the nature of the universality of the path of the great Abraham would have its appeal regardless, but I see your point ultimately it really is up to the individual themselves.
     
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  7. Epic Beard Man

    Epic Beard Man Bearded Philosopher

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    Perhaps not, but its origins are.
     
  8. Epic Beard Man

    Epic Beard Man Bearded Philosopher

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    But it matters when the expression of the devotion to God comes from the viewpoint from another culture's perspective.
     
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  9. Epic Beard Man

    Epic Beard Man Bearded Philosopher

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    This isn't about the perspective of God, but how the religion is presented to the observer.
     
  10. Epic Beard Man

    Epic Beard Man Bearded Philosopher

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    Brother, been labeled since I've came out the womb and since I walked the stage receiving my degree. But this isn't about me.

    What about those that are unsure who look to these three faiths?

    True, but then again to the person observing this, this may be difficult to comprehend.
     
  11. Epic Beard Man

    Epic Beard Man Bearded Philosopher

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    But if someone is questioning these stories from doctrine, and are unsure of their authenticity how can religious faith exemplify truth if its being questioned? In regards to sharing a common cultural tradition I disagree. Sure we human being share a common ancestor but culturally from a microcosmic standpoint it varies from culture to culture. Christian Koreans worship differently than Southern Baptist Christians.
     
  12. Epic Beard Man

    Epic Beard Man Bearded Philosopher

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    I do not disassociate language from culture. When you impart meaning in language most certainly culture is attached to it.
     
  13. Epic Beard Man

    Epic Beard Man Bearded Philosopher

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    Why?
     
  14. Epic Beard Man

    Epic Beard Man Bearded Philosopher

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    I thought you knew me better, of course I'm aware of the Noahide tradition.

    If I understand some of Maimonides works in relation to his book "The Guide for the perplexed" isn't that the reason why Maimonides broke the Bible down (including Mishneh Torah) to understand the context of Hebrew words, to distinguish the metaphorical, allegorical, and literal? I mean we see this all day with evangelical pastors who use the English language to make all things biblical literal. perhaps I was mistaken but I would've thought the Rambam would've made that clear that it is essential to understand the meanings of words and phrases in their Hebrew context.
     
  15. Epic Beard Man

    Epic Beard Man Bearded Philosopher

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    I'm a skeptic to, but the ideas even in isolation had to come from somewhere and in such detail it is impossible that in isolation human beings can conceive something like the Torah, Qur'an, or The Bhagavad Gita.

    I agree. This is true statistically for Muslim babies being born today, and the traditions of those who worshipped in the past.
     
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  16. Epic Beard Man

    Epic Beard Man Bearded Philosopher

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    Very well said...
     
  17. Epic Beard Man

    Epic Beard Man Bearded Philosopher

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    Perhaps in modern times no as Christianity and the Bible itself has many translations in different languages.

    This is true. There are some African tribes that are Muslim however they still impart certain African traditions that most strict Muslims would deem "shirk" or polytheism.

    Or, any truth that comes from divine providence works through a particular culture because in order to understand said truth it must be spoken and understood through the lens of the people under a common language, culture, and tradition.
     
  18. Tumah

    Tumah Veteran Member

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    I actually thought you did and was quite surprised that it didn't seem as though your post took that into consideration.

    Maimonides was writing for Jews though. For Jews, yes, knowledge of the Torah is an imperative. For non-Jews, it many cases it may even be prohibited according to Maimonides. That goes back to what I was saying in my previous post. For non-Jews, being a "good Gentile" according to Maimonides himself, is simply being aware that the Torah commands on behalf of G-d that non-Jews follow the 7 Noahide Laws and the practice of those Laws. Anything beyond that is not essential to being a "good Gentile" and those Laws are fairly universally understandable.
     
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  19. Epic Beard Man

    Epic Beard Man Bearded Philosopher

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    Well when we get into the particularities of the nature of Jesus that would require a different topic but generally speaking, when referencing the story of Jesus, his religious traditions and culture would play an important role in understanding who he is.
     
  20. Epic Beard Man

    Epic Beard Man Bearded Philosopher

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    I did, but the Noahide tradition at least in my mind regardless of it being considered a "gentile" tradition, would be considered a step brother to Judaism just as Islam is a cousin of the two. I just thought Noahide is more closely aligned to Judaism than anything therefore I sought no real philosophical distinction outside of that (of course aside from observing the other laws in the Torah).

    Correct.
     
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