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I Believe I have ADHD

Psalm23

Well-Known Member
I started looking into ADHD some time ago and found I relate to so much. A family member stated he had said he thought I had ADHD 10 years ago and my therapist also confirmed I showed signs of ADHD. I took the self assessment test and she told me I had it.

These are some things I have done.

- I have lost things a lot.
- I can be easily distracted by things going on around me and inner thoughts.
- I find myself fidgeting a bunch and don't like sitting still.
- I have accidentally bumped into things and got hurt or knocked something over on many occasions.

Here is also an article on ADHD. I relate to much of what it said .

3 Types of ADHD: Hyperactive, Inattentive, and Combined
 

JustGeorge

Not As Much Fun As I Look
Staff member
Premium Member
I started looking into ADHD some time ago and found I relate to so much. A family member stated he had said he thought I had ADHD 10 years ago and my therapist also confirmed I showed signs of ADHD. I took the self assessment test and she told me I had it.

These are some things I have done.

- I have lost things a lot.
- I can be easily distracted by things going on around me and inner thoughts.
- I find myself fidgeting a bunch and don't like sitting still.
- I have accidentally bumped into things and got hurt or knocked something over on many occasions.

Here is also an article on ADHD. I relate to much of what it said .

3 Types of ADHD: Hyperactive, Inattentive, and Combined

My sister was recently diagnosed with this at 31. She thinks she always had it(as do I) but my dad didn't believe this stuff existed and wouldn't ever get it checked out.
 

Shadow Wolf

Certified People sTabber
I've recently began to strongly suspect I have it, as there are a few things common for it that I relate to that are not common for autism. Loosing things easily, forgetting things easily, and my sleeping habits and eating tendencies and easily bored with routine are what has me thinking Ive got it because thise things are atypical for autism.
 

Truthseeker

Non-debating member when I can help myself
I started looking into ADHD some time ago and found I relate to so much. A family member stated he had said he thought I had ADHD 10 years ago and my therapist also confirmed I showed signs of ADHD. I took the self assessment test and she told me I had it.

These are some things I have done.

- I have lost things a lot.
- I can be easily distracted by things going on around me and inner thoughts.
- I find myself fidgeting a bunch and don't like sitting still.
- I have accidentally bumped into things and got hurt or knocked something over on many occasions.

Here is also an article on ADHD. I relate to much of what it said .

3 Types of ADHD: Hyperactive, Inattentive, and Combined
I'm the inattentive type. I am also on the autism spectrum. Often with autism there are comorbid conditions, a common one is ADHD.
 

ADigitalArtist

Veteran Member
Staff member
Premium Member
My biggest problems with ADHD are task initiation and directed attention. I got diagnosed and started medication when it was effecting my ability to drive. I would be unable to resist looking at activity off the road or tracing a bird's path over the car. I could be hyperfocused on a project to the extent that I wouldn't eat, drink or pee for 8 hours, but I couldn't choose which project would get the hyperfocus and which I would struggle to read a paragraph in.

It also gives me a manic posting style in forums where I'll be extremely active for a day then you won't see me for two weeks. :D
 

ADigitalArtist

Veteran Member
Staff member
Premium Member
I'm the inattentive type. I am also on the autism spectrum. Often with autism there are comorbid conditions, a common one is ADHD.
Yep, same. For women there is also a high comorbidity for PCOS because the estrogen progesterone cycle effects mood memory and focus, and PCOS mucks up that cycle and can cause dysfunction which presents as ADHD.
 

Brickjectivity

Turned to Stone. Now I stretch daily.
Staff member
Premium Member
Found out I had inattentive type way back near 2010, but by then I was already an adult. I recall many different ways it affected me long before then.

For example in third grade (early 1980s) I got spanked by a teacher once for inattention. I absolutely believed I'd done nothing wrong, but I got punished. In those days lots of students got spanked, so it was not that huge of a deal. Nobody thought much of the incident including me, but I never forgot the injustice or the randomness of it.

I did a self-study type of grammar school education, and I remember always being one of the last to finish my work (in a classroom with other self study students). This, too, was punished though not with spanking. My grades were good though.
 

pearl

Well-Known Member
For example in third grade (early 1980s) I got spanked by a teacher once for inattention. I absolutely believed I'd done nothing wrong, but I got punished. In those days lots of students got spanked, so it was not that huge of a deal. Nobody thought much of the incident including me, but I never forgot the injustice or the randomness of it.

Unfortunately, it is difficult to distinguish between symptoms of ADHD and misbehaving. The reason so important for a diagnosis. ADHD aside the child goes through the same problems of puberty, adolescence typical of the age.
It can be a constant struggle for parents, especially when sleep patterns are disrupted, and conflict with schedule it becomes almost impossible to meet the requirements for even getting up for school. The biggest mistake parents can make is to pacify an ADHD child. When my grandson was in elementary school his mother was physically able to dress him and literally drag him off to school. With his medication, once there he was fine and able to concentrate was enrolled in honor classes. In high school it was a constant struggle to get him out of bed, too often his mother gave up and as a result he is now 19 with no credible education, dashing his hopes of joining the military.
 

Brickjectivity

Turned to Stone. Now I stretch daily.
Staff member
Premium Member
Unfortunately, it is difficult to distinguish between symptoms of ADHD and misbehaving. The reason so important for a diagnosis. ADHD aside the child goes through the same problems of puberty, adolescence typical of the age.
It can be a constant struggle for parents, especially when sleep patterns are disrupted, and conflict with schedule it becomes almost impossible to meet the requirements for even getting up for school. The biggest mistake parents can make is to pacify an ADHD child. When my grandson was in elementary school his mother was physically able to dress him and literally drag him off to school. With his medication, once there he was fine and able to concentrate was enrolled in honor classes. In high school it was a constant struggle to get him out of bed, too often his mother gave up and as a result he is now 19 with no credible education, dashing his hopes of joining the military.
True. You do have to live, and you do have to accept personal responsibility. That is why it is my fault when I forget things or am late or daydream or blurt things out or find conversations to be stressful.

I'm glad that I don't have the fidgety type. People with that type have a more difficult experience I think. As you point out nobody can tell whether they are malicious or not.
 

Jayhawker Soule

<yawn> ignore </yawn>
Premium Member
I started looking into ADHD some time ago and found I relate to so much. A family member stated he had said he thought I had ADHD 10 years ago and my therapist also confirmed I showed signs of ADHD. I took the self assessment test and she told me I had it. ...
I hope that you can get confirmation. Clearly identifying the problem is the first step in successfully managing it. Best of luck!
 

Truthseeker

Non-debating member when I can help myself
I did a self-study type of grammar school education, and I remember always being one of the last to finish my work (in a classroom with other self study students). This, too, was punished though not with spanking. My grades were good though.
The same is true of me when it came to tests. I hadn't thought of that as being a manifestation of ADHD until now, which was worse then than now. I remember sitting in class, not paying much attention to what the teacher was saying. I had trouble getting started in reading texts outside of class. My grades were not that good through High School, and the first couple of years at University I had a lot of trouble. There were also other mental problems that contributed to that. When I went to a second University, my ADHD seemed to have improved, and I did very well. My employment record was spotty which ADHD made some contibution to, as well as other mental disorders, and my own attitude was not the best. Through the grace of God, my family has survived okay financially. We've gotten by.
 
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