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How I Stopped Believing the Earth Is 6,000 Years Young

Discussion in 'Science and Religion' started by Wandering Monk, May 24, 2019.

  1. Wandering Monk

    Wandering Monk Well-Known Member

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    #1 Wandering Monk, May 24, 2019
    Last edited: May 24, 2019
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  2. tosca1

    tosca1 Member

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    With me, it doesn't matter whether the earth is old or young.
    Imho - God doesn't tell us to believe earth is this old, or that. Yes, God is so much more bigger than that. God tells us to believe He is the Creator.

    I think science has a purpose in His divine plan. Particularly modern science.
    It slowly reveals the glory of God. of course, that's the religious in me speaking.

    Looking at the vastness of space and all the countless heavenly bodies that literally peppers it......it feels uncanny how there's nothing like earth.
    How earth is teeming with so much life - of various kinds!
    And yet, not a single one is found so far in space.

    We're now looking into other solar systems.......and science will settle for just even a SIGN of life.

    Thus I mused in another thread: wouldn't it be something that after all the search for other life forms in outer space - we end up finding another planet similar to earth - its population, also waving the Bible?
     
    #2 tosca1, May 24, 2019
    Last edited: May 24, 2019
  3. leov

    leov Well-Known Member
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  4. gnostic

    gnostic The Lost One

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    Ah, no.

    I loved all the works done by the optical and radio observatories, and all the space telescopes but all of them are pretty limited by what we can observe, detect, measure.

    I loved all the space missions, and we have no vessels manned or unmanned vessels capable even reaching the nearest star to our Sun, let alone going outside of the Milky Way.

    Voyager 1 & 2 are the only 2 unmanned probes in interstellar space, meaning going outside of the orbit of Pluto. And they have both being operations for 36 years (1977 to 2014) and 1 has travelled 127 AU or 1.9 x 10^10 km.

    Well guess what, Proxima Centauri is about 4.2 light years away or 286,000 AU, so Voyager 1 has only traveled a fraction of that distance (0.4%). Voyager 1 hasn’t even traveled 1 light year in 36 years.

    So, no. We still don’t have the technology capable of detecting life on any planet, outside of our solar system.

    You have been either seriously misinformed or you are relying on sci-fi novels or film industries, because the reality is we only just got started with looking for life on other planets, and it has stalled.

    As much as we have learned so much in a century, since Hubble discovered our Milky Way isn’t the only galaxy in the universe, we have barely scratched the surface. We don’t know as much as you think we do.
     
    #4 gnostic, May 25, 2019
    Last edited: May 25, 2019
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  5. tosca1

    tosca1 Member

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    Looks like you're right. I think I jumped the gun when I read this part.......

    .....that the following didn't register. :)


    Finding Life on Other Worlds - Science in the News
     
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  6. gnostic

    gnostic The Lost One

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    Good, then you do understand that we have no technology, even today, to detect life on other planets.

    We can detect chemical composition of atmosphere, and possible potential detection of water, but detecting life is currently not possible, unless we manage to leapfrog our technology forward.

    We have no manned or unmanned crafts capable of travelling to this Trappist-1. So we are still stuck with not knowing if life exist outside of solar system.
     
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  7. TagliatelliMonster

    TagliatelliMonster Well-Known Member

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    Dude.... we've not even scratched the surface of our own little galaxy and allready we've found dozens of earth like rocky planets orbitting in the goldilock zone.........

    It's kind of hard to find one without the ability to actually go there.
    If you find yourself on a planet orbitting alpha centauri and look towards the earth with our current technology, do you think you would see a planet "teeming with life"?

    Off course not. At best, if you're lucky, you'll be able to detect a rocky planet orbitting in the goldilock zone.

    So your comment (and implication), tbh, is quite ridiculous to use as an argument for (or against) anything.

    Mars shows signs of life.

    That would be impressive.
    But it's not gonna happen.

    I mean, when Colombus arrived in latin america, the natives were like "huh??? white people?" and they sure as heck had never heared for anything abrahamic.

    So if the bible couldn't even reach a society only a couple 1000 miles west, why on earth would it manage to reach an alien civilization millions of lightyears away?
     
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  8. Wandering Monk

    Wandering Monk Well-Known Member

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    The first most abundant element in the universe is hydrogen; the third is oxygen. Seems highly likely that the combination of two hydrogen and one oxygen should give us lots of water/ice in the universe.
     
    #8 Wandering Monk, May 28, 2019
    Last edited: May 28, 2019
  9. Polymath257

    Polymath257 Think & Care
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    Um...water isn't an element. You meant oxygen, which is.

    And yes, water (at least in ice form) is very common in the universe.
     
  10. Wandering Monk

    Wandering Monk Well-Known Member

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    That was a flub. I meant to say oxygen. Fixed the post.
     
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  11. Hockeycowboy

    Hockeycowboy Well-Known Member
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    From reading and studying the Scriptures -- now this is speculation of course -- but it is probable that we humans are the first sentient and intelligent flesh, and these planets being discovered are for us to eventually inhabit. So, we'll be "waving the Bible"... and other 'scrolls that will be opened' -- Revelation 20 12. It makes sense, that would be Jehovah God's purpose.
     
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