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How do you react to religious greetings?

Discussion in 'Interfaith Discussion' started by Tarheeler, Oct 12, 2011.

  1. IsmailaGodHasHeard

    IsmailaGodHasHeard Well-Known Member

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    I know. I wish people peace all the time.
     
  2. Protester

    Protester Active Member

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    Was this ever posted at any time?

    Jewish holidays have a meaning to Christians as well.:yes:

    How did Jesus fulfill the meanings of the Jewish feasts?

    Purim doesn't have a great meaning for Christians, if memory serves, though of course the reason for celebrating it, is of interest to us (See the Book of Esther).
     
  3. Villager

    Villager Active Member

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    Any country in which a majority use such greetings as "Merry Christmas" and "Happy Easter" is not Christian. There is no such thing as a Christian country, only countries in which a majority make pretence of Christianity.

    Christians are mystified, at best, by any greeting that genuinely associates the special regard of any particular day with their faith. In most cases, the greeter has no idea that Christians, as Christians, do not observe any special days, sabbaths or festivals, so persistent is the myth of Christian occasions.They usually have no idea that the word 'Christmas' is self-contradictory blasphemy, and that the word 'Easter' probably derives from a practice that was forbidden by the Christian God. At worst, they take it as malice, the malice of those who fear Christ, who seek to shift Christians to a weakened position. To Christians, all of their time is the same walk with God, and one does not walk any closer because of arbitrary, some man-made occasion that makes no sense anyway.

    'But now that you know God– or rather are known by God– how is it that you are turning back to those weak and miserable principles? Do you wish to be enslaved by them all over again? You are observing special days and months and seasons and years! I fear for you, that somehow I have wasted my efforts on you' Gal 4:9-11 (NIV)

    But whether though ignorance or fearful malice, this sort of greeting is inappropriate, a possible deliberate infringement of personal rights and respect in the case of greetings to Christians, and an attack on Christianity, knowingly or not, for greetings between non-Christians. So members of non-Christian religions in 'Christian-majority' countries, which is almost everyone, have a choice of taking sides against Christians, or of doing something else.
     
    #83 Villager, Nov 1, 2011
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2011
  4. Antiochian

    Antiochian Rationalist

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    As long as Baptists don't mind my wishing them a happy Beltane, then I'm more than happy to have a "Merry Christmas." I understand these greetings are said with good intentions, I just don't like the assumption being made that everyone else celebrates St. Sigmund's Day or the Festival of Souls Eating Moldy Cheese in Purgatory just because they do.

    When I was still a practicing Greek Orthodox some years back, I was driven mad by people wishing me a happy Easter when "Pascha" was still a month away, or a happy Christmas when the majority of Orthodox observe "Nativity" in January.
     
  5. 9-10ths_Penguin

    9-10ths_Penguin 1/10 Riboflavin
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    In some denominations, I would think that wishing someone else a "happy" Easter during Lent or on Good Friday could be seen as being in rather bad taste.
     
  6. Villager

    Villager Active Member

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    A past festival of the Israelites.

    The cult of whom the Israelites excluded from Israel.
     
  7. Mestemia

    Mestemia Advocatus Diaboli
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    I seem to have misplaced my pontoon boat...
     
  8. Breathe

    Breathe Hostis humani generis

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    Are you saying Jewish people (or Israelites, your choice) don't celebrate Pesakh (which Pescha is a term borrowed from them)? Or are you implying that Israelites once celebrated the Christian Resurrection? :confused::confused:

    Wha.. what?
    :confused:
    What do you mean?

    :confused:
     
  9. Kilgore Trout

    Kilgore Trout Misanthropic Humanist

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    I scream and hiss as wisps of acrid smoke rise off burning blisters on my skin. I go through a lot of aloe.
     
  10. Villager

    Villager Active Member

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    Which is it to be? If Jesus was not the Christ, there is Passover, but no Christ- and even pagans cannot celebrate their beloved 'Christmas'. If Jesus was the Christ, the Passover is now a mere prophetic pointer to him, and is now of only teaching interest. One, or the other.

    But the point here is that we have two sets of non-Christians making a tremendous commotion over observing the same event, but they cannot even give it a descriptive name- like 'Resurrection Day'. Why is that? Is resurrection a bit too much to swallow, in practice? Does Jesus cause embarrassment by his comment about 'the sign of Jonah' given to an adulterous generation?

    Now the irony is that one set of people plumps for the word 'Passover', which described an event concerning Israelites that was nothing much to do with the resurrection of Jesus, but which now seems pious enough, but has connotations of works-salvationism. Which, as it happens, these same people mostly believe in; so resurrection means nothing to them, anyway, however much they may parade and light candles etc.

    The other set of people are often equally devoted to earning their own salvation, but are liable to give the resurrection a name generally thought to be a variant of Ishtar, a Babylonian goddess, who was forbidden to and by the same Israelites who very properly kept Passover. :)

    It's just an ironic instance of the madness to which fear of Jesus sends people.
     
  11. Flankerl

    Flankerl Well-Known Member

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    I usually just smile and nod. Not much i could do else.
     
  12. Kathryn

    Kathryn Most Spoiled Woman Ever

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    "fear of Jesus????"

    Who is afraid of Jesus? Certainly not me. He is my Rock, my Salvation, my Friend, my Deliverer, my Bridegroom, my Prince, my strong Fortress.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. Oneatatime

    Oneatatime Huh?

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    I normally just reply in kind because it doesn't imply that I hold to their belief system, simply that I hope they enjoy their religious observances. It doesn't cost anything to be nice under such circumstances and there is little benefit in being confrontational about the issue.
     
  14. Villager

    Villager Active Member

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    There is more option than confrontation. One can ask why a person believes as he or she does, and perhaps develop an interesting and constructive discussion. One can ask, very gently, perhaps, why they suppose, without knowledge, that others believe as they do.

    One does not have to suggest that they want others to believe as they do because they fear them doing otherwise. But it may well be the truth, and maybe life is far too short not to suggest it.
     
  15. Oneatatime

    Oneatatime Huh?

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    'Happy Christmas' like 'How are you doing?' is a social pleasantry and generally not considered to be an invitation for an in depth debate about someone's religious convictions or the current circumstances of someone's life. Turning it into a debate in either circumstance is generally considered to be socially inappropriate which is why there are certain people who I choose to great in an alternative manner because I've no interest in listening to their life story every morning when I arrive at work. Equally I'm sure those people who celebrate Christmas for religious reasons aren't anticipating or particularly interested in being questioned about their religious convictions when they wish someone a happy Christmas.

    Take the comment as it's intended, carry on with your day and leave them to theirs. Especially since, as I said earlier, wishing someone a Happy Christmas does not imply that that person being addressed is a Christian, only that they hope that this individual has a good time over the Christmas period. Being intolerant of other peoples expression of religious views and beliefs where they differ from ones own and are largely inconsequential isn't a prerequisite of being an atheist (or agnostic or member of a different religion for that matter).

    I hope that you don't take the same approach any time someone says 'bless you' after you've sneezed.
     
    #95 Oneatatime, Nov 4, 2011
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2011
  16. Kilgore Trout

    Kilgore Trout Misanthropic Humanist

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    I hope he's getting some good oral action for all that.
     
  17. gnomon

    gnomon Well-Known Member

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    I say Merry Christmas right back at them. Sincerely.

    Don't really have many people saying Happy Easter to me. But when they do I just say you too.

    Have a blessed day? I get that a lot and considering that the person giving such a farewell sincerely means it I fail to understand how it can be offensive. Acting like it is would just make you look like a prick.

    edit: Forgot there was more to the question. As far as other religious greetings I get them so rarely that other than a "Happy Hannukah" here or there I don't know if I've ever received any other religious greeting. I don't really mind if someone says Happy Hannukah to me. I can only imagine I said "you too" back to them.
     
    #97 gnomon, Nov 4, 2011
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2011
  18. Villager

    Villager Active Member

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    No doubt that is true for some, between themselves. Nobody is going to try to prevent them, if only because there is no opportunity to do so. But if 'Happy Christmas' is like 'How are you doing?', why not use the latter, or some neutral seasonal greeting, exclusively? People don't do that; and some won't do it, because they are terrrified of Christ. They insist on aggressively using a practice that they well know is 'weak and miserable', because those are the 'qualities' they really want in society. They are bullies and cowards, yet many of the others are terrified of them. The remedy is, don't be weak and miserable. Your conscience will condemn you for evermore if you are.

    In fact, one would be certified insane if one used the logic of 'Christmas' consistently, because it is contradiction in term- just the one. One cannot have a Christ and a Mass. That seems to me to be an invitation for an in-depth debate about someone's religious convictions that cannot be refused. Though of course the greeter may pass on rapidly before it can be discussed, using the 'greeting' as a form of hate speech. But, when differences of personal belief are concerned, where possible, people should be held to account for every syllable they utter.
     
  19. Poisonshady313

    Poisonshady313 Well-Known Member

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    The same goes for the phrase "Happy Holidays". I wish people would stop acting with hostility towards that expression.
     
  20. Kathryn

    Kathryn Most Spoiled Woman Ever

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    Can I get an "AMEN!"
     
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