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Help me choose

Discussion in 'Jobs and Careers' started by Ðanisty, Apr 5, 2007.

  1. Ðanisty

    Ðanisty Well-Known Member

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    Okay, I plan to go back to school once my husband gets a permanent duty station. I have a couple of ideas, but what I need is some job suggestions on what I can do with these degrees:

    History. I absolutely adore it. I never get tired of talking about. Even subjects I already know a great deal about (like Alexander the Great) still get me excited when I start talking about them. I'm thinking possibly specializing in Ancient, Greek, or Russian history. Those are all quite fascinating to me. My problem? I really don't want to be a teacher. I just don't like kids at all. I like teaching to people who are genuinely interested...ya know? So, aside from being a teacher, what can I do with a history degree?

    Theology. I'm of mixed feelings on this one. I love learning about religions. Everyone of them interests me to some degree. However, I'm a Luciferian and I'm afraid that the theology community might discriminate against me. I've always been in positions where I don't have to share my religion with people and although the idea of sharing Luciferianism with people is kind of exciting, it's also kind of worrisome. I'd never be able to simply brush that in the closet to further my career or whatnot. You can't exactly be a theologian without sharing your religious experiences...nobody would take you seriously.

    So what do you think? Perhaps I could even specialize in Biblical history? I don't know....just please give me some ideas because I can't do accounting anymore...I'll stab my eyes out. I want to do something I love and I want to find a way to make money at it without having to deal with whiny, snotty, arrogant kids who are convinced that what you're telling them doesn't matter in the real world.
     
  2. Comprehend

    Comprehend Res Ipsa Loquitur

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    Have you thought about teaching history in college? The students there are much different than k-12. Most are interested in the subject matter and since you like history so much, you could teach a very specialized course topic such as a course on Alexander the Great or Plato or another area that interested you.
     
  3. Ðanisty

    Ðanisty Well-Known Member

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    How much harder is it to become a college professor than to be a gradeschool teacher? How much more education does it take?
     
  4. lilithu

    lilithu The Devil's Advocate

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    Depending on the place where you are at, you may face discrimination or you may not. Academics tend to be open-minded to such differences. But, you know, some place like Bob Jones University is not going to be.

    The bigger concern I would have about pursuing theology is that the options to you when you graduate are even narrower than for history. There are very few jobs for theologians. You can teach college, but not all colleges offer theology. Or you can teach in a seminary. And I don't think (?) that there are any Luciferian seminaries. Or you can write on your own.

    Also, theology programs tend to be very traditional and very Christian-oriented. You would spend years learning Greek or Hebrew or Aramaic in order to read biblical scripture. As much as you may like learning about different religions, in graduate school you would be immersed in only one, no more than two, and more likely only a small subset of one. (Since graduate school is all about specialization.)

    I've been pondering these things myself as I consider pursuing a Ph.D. in theology, and I have concerns. Have you considered Religious Studies instead of theology? It might be more up your alley. :)
     
  5. lilithu

    lilithu The Devil's Advocate

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    Ph.D., and even then it's not guaranteed.
     
  6. Ðanisty

    Ðanisty Well-Known Member

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    See, that's why I don't consider teaching a possibility...lol.

    So what other jobs are out there for historians?
     
  7. lilithu

    lilithu The Devil's Advocate

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    hmm... let me take my last statement back, slightly. I do know a guy who got a teaching gig at a small liberal arts college in PA with just a masters. And you can teach at community colleges with just masters but that's usually not a salaried/secure position. You get paid by the semester, often depending on enrollment. So it is possible, but I also know a lot of Ph.D.'s who have trouble getting jobs. It would of course also depend on whether you were willing to move to where ever the job was, etc. and a little luck.


    Actually, I don't really know, having never considered an advanced degree in history. But I have met history majors that end up with cool, unexpected jobs, in addition to the teaching gigs. For example, you might be able to work at a museum that deals with history, creating exibits. Or you could be a consultant for movie/tv studios or theaters when they're doing a period piece. Not saying that these jobs are all that abundant, mind you. I've just gotten the impression that there are more possibilities with a history degree.

    What do other people say? :eek:
     
  8. Ðanisty

    Ðanisty Well-Known Member

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    I'll be moving where the Army sends my husband. :eek:


    See, if I could just work for the History Channel! I would love that...lol.
     
  9. PetShopBoy88

    PetShopBoy88 Active Member

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    No, that's not true. Many of my teachers only have masters degrees.
     
  10. Ðanisty

    Ðanisty Well-Known Member

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    I'm going to guess this is all about where you live. If there's a high saturation of qualified people in the area, then even people with higher degrees will have trouble.
     
  11. lizskid

    lizskid BANNED

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    Museum work of some sort, library work, work in publishing (especially textbook or non-fiction editing), research consultation, foreign policy/facilitating, PR staffer, government service, archivist, lobbyist. Some I had in my head, some from the American Historical Association.
     
  12. lilithu

    lilithu The Devil's Advocate

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    And what/where is this school, may I ask? I know people with doctorates who are teaching high school.
     
  13. PetShopBoy88

    PetShopBoy88 Active Member

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    Yeah, that's a good point. I was just guarding against a blanket statement that a PhD is the only thing that qualifies to teach at a university level.

    I will say it's small and private, but beyond that, I'd actually rather not say. You'll just have to take my word for it, and if that's not good enough so be it. :)
     
  14. nutshell

    nutshell Well-Known Member

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    There are major state universities on the west coast that don't require PhD's. It's a myth.

    The key with college these days is to start small. You'd probably have to work adjunct at multiple community colleges before getting a university gig. Then you try to get on a tenure track.

    Certainly, a PhD would be a plus, but not having it will not rule you out.
     
  15. lilithu

    lilithu The Devil's Advocate

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    In other words:

    "And you can teach at community colleges with just masters but that's usually not a salaried/secure position. You get paid by the semester, often depending on enrollment."

    And might I add that the likelihood of getting a tenure track position at a major university going this route is much smaller than the likelihood of getting it with a Ph.D., which isn't high to begin with.
     
  16. lilithu

    lilithu The Devil's Advocate

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    I would also add that it depends on the subject matter that you're teaching.


    Believe it or not, that's about as much information as I wanted. It's not like I planned to stalk you.
     
  17. PetShopBoy88

    PetShopBoy88 Active Member

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    Haha. Booyah!
     
  18. Comprehend

    Comprehend Res Ipsa Loquitur

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    I am not sure about that. I think it depends on the area you teach, I know that many education students can get a job teaching in college while they are finishing up degrees. I had a couple undergrad professors who taught and went to school at the same time.
     
  19. Feathers in Hair

    Feathers in Hair World's Tallest Hobbit

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    With your enthusiasm, I imagine you'd make a great writer! I know that might not be the most practical pursuit, but reading a book by someone who's actually excited about the subject is about ten times more interesting than the alternative! Plus, y'know, you would automatically have the whole forums as your fan base!

    As Lizskid suggested, you might wish to think about museum work, as well. With your husband in the Army, you might wish to investigate those areas of work in history where one could either easily transfer to a new environment or work from home.
     
  20. PetShopBoy88

    PetShopBoy88 Active Member

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    Add to that, I don't think most colleges require their teachers to be teacher certified, whereas to be a K-12 educator you have to know content area and education. But, I might be off on that. It's not something I'm that well versed in.
     
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