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Hats In Religion

Discussion in 'Comparative Religion' started by SalixIncendium, Jul 25, 2021.

  1. SalixIncendium

    SalixIncendium अहं ब्रह्मास्मि
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    Does your religion have a sacred hat? If so, what is it?

    Is it worn by men and women alike? If not, why not?

    Is it encourage or discouraged to wear a hat during worship? Why?

    Is wearing a hat dependent on hierarchy in your religion? Are there different hats for different levels of the hierarchy? If so, why?
     
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  2. Rival

    Rival Dex Me Gart
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    No, but I have read that some priests wore animal masks like the animal heads of some of the Aspects. There are many forms of headwear most folks are aware of from Kemet, such as the Pschent crown.
     
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  3. Marcion

    Marcion gopa of humanity's controversial Taraka Brahma

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    In my spiritual cult (not part of a religion), the monks wear turbans and the nuns wear ehm caps?
    They are part of the uniform for celibate missionaries.
    Orange colour represents selfless service to all.
    Family teachers may wear white clothing and white head dress.

    [​IMG]
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    #3 Marcion, Jul 25, 2021
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2021
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  4. stvdv

    stvdv Veteran Member

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    I see recently a lot of new "heads" on RF in people's Avatars. Would be an interesting new RF Rule ... Avatar[selfie]. Should I change my Avatar?
     
  5. SalixIncendium

    SalixIncendium अहं ब्रह्मास्मि
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    Entirely up to you. If you're comfortable doing so, by all means. If not, then don't.
     
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  6. Jayhawker Soule

    Jayhawker Soule <yawn> ignore </yawn>
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  7. Gargovic Malkav

    Gargovic Malkav Active Member

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    I worship and believe in the One I see as the Source of Everything as a result of experience and faith. Label me as you see fit.
    Never liked wearing hats.
    I only do it when I feel I absolutely have to.
     
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  8. stvdv

    stvdv Veteran Member

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    Wow, many questions in just a few lines
    When I was in the Ashram, there were members of almost all religions present. And all were allowed and even advised to keep their own rituals, so also to dress their own way. I really liked the Sikh 'hat'. There was a Sikh in charge, controlling the masses (many times over 50 thousand). And he looked a bit like below, looking beautiful and strong and radiating respect, so whenever he showed up, people behaved better instantly.
    upload_2021-7-25_14-49-14.png

    We had to sit and wait in scorching heat, esp. in 1992-1996 for like 4 hours daily, waiting for Darshan. In those years I understood the practical use of hats in these hot climates, and I tried a few myself.

    Many Indians and foreigners used the simple but effective :cool:"handkerchief-hat":cool:. Cooling and easy (my choice:))
    upload_2021-7-25_14-40-1.png upload_2021-7-25_14-40-34.png


    I also liked/used this one:
    upload_2021-7-25_14-42-41.png

    But for me nothing beats this one; only those I did not see much in the Ashram:
    upload_2021-7-25_14-45-29.png

    So, in my faith there is not a "one hat fits all" prescription. And no need to wear a hat. Sai Baba had his students very well dressed in white and no long hairs, no beard. Looked really nice, large groups all looking the same. His female students usually all wear a similar dress, but the others dressed in all colors of the rainbow. I liked both ways, though the 1 color for all radiates some kind of serenity (less distraction also).
     
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  9. RestlessSoul

    RestlessSoul Well-Known Member

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    This doesn’t go with any of my clothes, so I don’t often wear it…

    78EBB640-6535-4E9B-8FE2-75E84646EC44.jpeg
     
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  10. Secret Chief

    Secret Chief Meghalayan Ape

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    9C765F7D-6201-4B39-9501-4DC3AA4865C2.jpeg
     
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  11. It Aint Necessarily So

    It Aint Necessarily So Well-Known Member
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    I don't have a religion, but if I did, it might be Latvian Orthodox - for the hats:

     
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  12. Vouthon

    Vouthon Dominus Deus tuus ignis consumens est
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    Great set of questions as ever, Salix.

    My religion doesn't mandate any kind of religious clothing for the lay faithful as a whole, akin to say the turban amongst Sikhs, or the hijab worn by Muslims in conformance with sharia law.

    Nevertheless, Catholic clergy of every class - from deacon and priest, up to bishops and archbishops (as well as the honorary class of cardinals), even the Pope himself - are entitled to wear a zucchetto as a mark of their ordained status: a small, spherical, form-fitting ecclesiastical skull-cap, that resembles half a pumpkin and also a Jewish kippah, typically made from silk.

    A zucchetto is never donned by a priest inside a Church, while Bishops, Cardinals, and the Pope have it on their heads throughout a Mass but remove it during the consecration of the host (i.e. the blessing of the Eucharist).

    Moreover, the colour of the zucchetto signifies the clerical ranking of the wearer, with priests and deacons wearing a black skullcap; bishops, archbishops and abbots a reddish coloured one; scarlet for cardinals and white for a pope or pope emeritus:


    [​IMG]


    upload_2021-7-25_16-34-45.jpeg

    In addition to the zucchetto, there are other types of clerical headgear worn by the higher-ranking clergymen.

    For example, bishops (including the Pope as Bishop of Rome) wear a mitre - a tall folding cap, typically ornately patterned, with two flowing lappets at the back:


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    [​IMG]

    upload_2021-7-25_16-35-18.jpeg

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    upload_2021-7-25_16-35-43.jpeg
     
    #12 Vouthon, Jul 25, 2021
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2021
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  13. AlexanderG

    AlexanderG Active Member

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    Just for well-intentioned chuckles, and not to offend:

    [​IMG]
     
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  14. Secret Chief

    Secret Chief Meghalayan Ape

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    Enough with the questions!
    I only know of it in Tibetan Buddhism, which ain't my thing and I'm not up on the sartorial guidelines. Maybe it's cos it's cold there?
     
  15. Secret Chief

    Secret Chief Meghalayan Ape

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    What the actual?!
     
  16. sun rise

    sun rise "This is the Hour of God"
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  17. Viker

    Viker Filia Diaboli, in a shroud of metaphor and mystery

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    Not necessarily. But I want another one of these.

    PSX_20210730_031547.jpg
     
  18. Harel13

    Harel13 Am Yisrael Chai
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    In Judaism, It's not the kippah, which may surprise some people. The kippah is a traditional type of head-covering, but it's not sacred. There are only three head coverings that I can think of that are sacred: The two sorts of hats worn by the priests in the Temple:

    upload_2021-7-30_10-40-35.png

    https://www.temple.org.il/single-post/2017/07/11/-d7-9e-d7-92-d7-91-d7-a2-d7-aa

    upload_2021-7-30_10-39-45.png

    https://www.temple.org.il/single-post/2017/06/14/-d7-9e-d7-a6-d7-a0-d7-a4-d7-aa

    and the Tallit, when placed on the head:

    [​IMG]

    And that's where the kippah comes in. Originally, a head-covering - any sort - was needed for worship. Eventually, Jews started covering their heads all of the time. Nowadays, generally Orthodox Jews are those that wear head-coverings all of the time and Jews of other denominations generally (from what I know) only wear during worship.

    Well, priest hats were worn only by male priests, because only male priests serve in the Temple. Kippot (plu. of Kippah) were traditionally only worn by men, while married women wore a scarf or a wig. Nowadays, in non-Orthodox denominations, some women also wear kippot during worship services. Traditionally, this was not done because of the Jewish law that does not allow cross-dressing. The kippah (or any one of the historical sorts of head-coverings) was a male head-covering. For similar reasons, also the Tallit was used only by men. Only men are commanded to put strings in their four-cornered garments.
    As I said, there are two types of priestly hats. One worn by the high priest and another worn by the rest of the priests. Priests may only be men descended from Aharon, the first high priest (brother of Moshe).
     
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  19. Twilight Hue

    Twilight Hue Twilight, not bright nor dark, good nor bad.

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    Try getting in a car with that thing.
     
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