• Welcome to Religious Forums, a friendly forum to discuss all religions in a friendly surrounding.

    Your voice is missing! You will need to register to get access to the following site features:
    • Reply to discussions and create your own threads.
    • Our modern chat room. No add-ons or extensions required, just login and start chatting!
    • Access to private conversations with other members.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon!

Gen Z and LGBTQ+ identity

Orbit

I'm a planet
I'm not a demographer, but I try to keep an eye on population trends related to U.S. society. A 2021 Gallup poll (summary linked below) finds that Gen Zers (Generation Z comprises people born between 1996 and 2010.) are more likely to identify with the LGBTQ+ community than the generations that came before them.

One hypothesis I had is perhaps it has become more socially acceptable to "come out" and openly be a part of that community than it was in previous generations. We are certainly living through a backlash to that cultural change in the U.S.; I don't think the rising numbers are because of Drag Queen Story Hours or "liberal indoctrination", though.

The overall percentage of LGBTQ+ people in the U.S. is 7.1% (see 2022 article here: LGBT Identification in U.S. Ticks Up to 7.1%).

Story on Gen Z here: https://www.axios.com/2022/02/17/lgbtq-generation-z-gallup
 

vulcanlogician

Well-Known Member
Probably a laundry list of reasons, with social acceptability being at the top. I grew up in Gen X times, in rural America. There was plenty of hatred around for homosexuals. One of my closest friends was closeted for this very reason.

Another reason could be the expanded categorization. In the 90s, you were either gay or straight (or bi, I suppose... which pretty much put you in the "gay" camp). With the understanding that there are grey areas, new categories of people were identified. People who aren't gay... but something else.

Personal rant: We've got enough letters going on with LGBTQI+. All we really need is one letter: "Q".... All the other letters (or categories) fit under that umbrella. The important bit is that we ensure equal rights for those who are "Q." Making sure we have a letter for every kind of "Q" imaginable is annoying. It's wankery, masquerading as activism.
 

Estro Felino

Believer in free will
Premium Member
Honestly...I have never understood what Q is.
First of all there is not such a word in my language. The term is non-existent.
So I would like to understand what Q means and why it should be included in the LGBT acronym. :)

Because if it's a very vague definition, anyone...even heterosexuals can call themselves Q, so that is why so many young people fall into the LGBT spectrum.
 

Orbit

I'm a planet
Honestly...I have never understood what Q is.
First of all there is not such a word in my language. The term is non-existent.
So I would like to understand what Q means and why it should be included in the LGBT acronym. :)

Because if it's a very vague definition, anyone...even heterosexuals can call themselves Q, so that is why so many young people fall into the LGBT spectrum.
My understanding is that people interpret the "Q" in two possible ways: (1) Queer and (2) Questioning.
 

We Never Know

No Slack
I'm not a demographer, but I try to keep an eye on population trends related to U.S. society. A 2021 Gallup poll (summary linked below) finds that Gen Zers (Generation Z comprises people born between 1996 and 2010.) are more likely to identify with the LGBTQ+ community than the generations that came before them.

One hypothesis I had is perhaps it has become more socially acceptable to "come out" and openly be a part of that community than it was in previous generations. We are certainly living through a backlash to that cultural change in the U.S.; I don't think the rising numbers are because of Drag Queen Story Hours or "liberal indoctrination", though.

The overall percentage of LGBTQ+ people in the U.S. is 7.1% (see 2022 article here: LGBT Identification in U.S. Ticks Up to 7.1%).

Story on Gen Z here: https://www.axios.com/2022/02/17/lgbtq-generation-z-gallup

About 5% of young adults(18-29) in the U.S. say their gender is different from their sex assigned at birth

 

Estro Felino

Believer in free will
Premium Member
My understanding is that people interpret the "Q" in two possible ways: (1) Queer and (2) Questioning.
Right.
But what does queer mean? Bisexual?
There's already the B in Lgbt.

As for questioning...heterosexuals who are undecided are not LGBT.
 

Estro Felino

Believer in free will
Premium Member
I mean, yeah. It stands for "queer." I suppose a heterosexual might be queer in some way or the other. But in colloquial usage (originally pejorative) it has historically referred to both gays and lesbians.
...which doesn't exist in my language, for instance.
 

Orbit

I'm a planet

About 5% of young adults(18-29) in the U.S. say their gender is different from their sex assigned at birth


Thanks. From the study you posted:
"The share of adults who know someone who is transgender has increased from 42% in 2021 and from 37% in 2017."

I'm having a hard time squaring that info with the 5% figure. I guess those 5% really get around?

Just to clarify, the study I posted isn't exclusive to transgender, which is a subset of LGBT. Someone could be in that group without being transgender.
 

Orbit

I'm a planet
Right.
But what does queer mean? Bisexual?
There's already the B in Lgbt.

As for questioning...heterosexuals who are undecided are not LGBT.

I'm just telling you how some people see it. "Queer" as an English word has a troubled history. Some people who use it say they've "reclaimed it" as a sign of pride from what was once a heavily stigmatized and pejorative label. Definitions of "what counts as queer" vary by individual.
 

We Never Know

No Slack
...which doesn't exist in my language, for instance.

What is the difference between the words gay and queer

"Both gay and queer are often used as self-identifying terms. As always, when referring to another person—and when sexuality or gender identity is relevant—it is best to use whatever term a person uses for themself.

In the context of sexual identity, the word gay is generally used to mean “of, relating to, or being a person who is sexually or romantically attracted to people of their own sex or gender.” Often, the word gay is used specifically in reference to men who are attracted to other men. Women who are attracted to other women often use the word lesbian, though some women also use the term gay as well.

On the other hand, people who apply the word queer to themselves use it to indicate a sexual orientation that is not heterosexual and/or a gender identity that is not cisgender. Some people may identify as both gay and queer, with some using the terms to indicate different things in different contexts.

 

Estro Felino

Believer in free will
Premium Member
What is the difference between the words gay and queer

"Both gay and queer are often used as self-identifying terms. As always, when referring to another person—and when sexuality or gender identity is relevant—it is best to use whatever term a person uses for themself.

In the context of sexual identity, the word gay is generally used to mean “of, relating to, or being a person who is sexually or romantically attracted to people of their own sex or gender.” Often, the word gay is used specifically in reference to men who are attracted to other men. Women who are attracted to other women often use the word lesbian, though some women also use the term gay as well.

On the other hand, people who apply the word queer to themselves use it to indicate a sexual orientation that is not heterosexual and/or a gender identity that is not cisgender. Some people may identify as both gay and queer, with some using the terms to indicate different things in different contexts.

It's too vague.
There are already four letters to indicate sexual conditions and sexual orientations.
Adding one which sums them all up is useless, and frustrating, because it vilifies the serious activism and the defense of people's rights.

Otherwise...anyone can invent a definition and demand it is attached to the LGBT spectrum.

A woman can identify as nympho, N, because she sleeps with 30 people a week...and so ...that's an identity too.

It has gone out of hand.
Earnestness is required.
 

Orbit

I'm a planet
It's too vague.
There are already four letters to indicate sexual conditions and sexual orientations.
Adding one which sums them all up is useless, and frustrating, because it vilifies the serious activism and the defense of people's rights.

Otherwise...anyone can invent a definition and demand that is attached to the LGBT spectrum.

A woman can identify as nympho because she sleeps with 30 people a week...and so ...that's an identity too.

It has gone out of hand.
Earnestness is required.
It's only vague to you because you don't live in the US and see how the word is used in everyday life.
 

Jayhawker Soule

-- untitled --
Premium Member
Probably a laundry list of reasons, with social acceptability being at the top. I grew up in Gen X times, in rural America. There was plenty of hatred around for homosexuals. One of my closest friends was closeted for this very reason.

Another reason could be the expanded categorization. In the 90s, you were either gay or straight (or bi, I suppose... which pretty much put you in the "gay" camp). With the understanding that there are grey areas, new categories of people were identified. People who aren't gay... but something else.
Good post.

Personal rant: We've got enough letters going on with LGBTQI+. All we really need is one letter: "Q".... All the other letters (or categories) fit under that umbrella. The important bit is that we ensure equal rights for those who are "Q." Making sure we have a letter for every kind of "Q" imaginable is annoying. It's wankery, masquerading as activism.
I agree with all but the conclusion.

Personally, I'm fine with LGBT. At the the same time, I think that folks have the right to self-identify. For some it might be a case of "wankery, masquerading as activism," but, for others, there is a sincere sense that LGBTQ fails to capture - and thereby distorts - their perception of their gender and/or sexuality. I'm in no position to trivialize that feeling.
 

vulcanlogician

Well-Known Member
I agree with all but the conclusion.

Personally, I'm fine with LGBT. At the the same time, I think that folks have the right to self-identify. For some it might be a case of "wankery, masquerading as activism," but, for others, there is a sincere sense that LGBTQ fails to capture - and thereby distorts - their perception of their gender and/or sexuality. I'm in no position to trivialize that feeling.

You are right to disagree. I misspoke. I should have said, "It's wankery masquerading as activism sometimes."

It is not the idea of analyzing self-identities that bothers me. That is certainly a project worth pursuing.

What bothers me is that it is (sometimes) misused by wankers who happen to be posing as activists. There are plenty of genuine activists out there making good use of the categories. But there are also some who attribute more usefulness to the naming of such categories than it actually has. We ought to discourage this, imo.
 

crossfire

LHP Mercuræn Feminist Heretic ☿
Premium Member
It's too vague.
There are already four letters to indicate sexual conditions and sexual orientations.
Adding one which sums them all up is useless, and frustrating, because it vilifies the serious activism and the defense of people's rights.

Otherwise...anyone can invent a definition and demand it is attached to the LGBT spectrum.

A woman can identify as nympho, N, because she sleeps with 30 people a week...and so ...that's an identity too.

It has gone out of hand.
Earnestness is required.
Nonbinary (genderqueer) would fit under the "Q" category.
 

Twilight Hue

Twilight, not bright nor dark, good nor bad.
What is the difference between the words gay and queer

"Both gay and queer are often used as self-identifying terms. As always, when referring to another person—and when sexuality or gender identity is relevant—it is best to use whatever term a person uses for themself.

In the context of sexual identity, the word gay is generally used to mean “of, relating to, or being a person who is sexually or romantically attracted to people of their own sex or gender.” Often, the word gay is used specifically in reference to men who are attracted to other men. Women who are attracted to other women often use the word lesbian, though some women also use the term gay as well.

On the other hand, people who apply the word queer to themselves use it to indicate a sexual orientation that is not heterosexual and/or a gender identity that is not cisgender. Some people may identify as both gay and queer, with some using the terms to indicate different things in different contexts.

They should return gay to just mean happy or joyous again. They got their own word now.
 

Quintessence

Consults with Trees
Staff member
Premium Member
It's not just about it being more socially acceptable - it's discovering the language to describe yourself that you simply never had before because nobody talked about these things in your culture.

I grew up in a generation where I was told that a human were either a "boy" or a "girl" in no uncertain terms. Wasn't taught about the difference between sex and gender either. I was told which one I was - and that sex and gender were the same thing - and I didn't identify with any of that, to put it mildly. But when I was told the only categories were this or that, I had no word to put to myself at all that weren't pejoratives. It wasn't about wanting to hide who and what I was. I never cared about that. I literally didn't have the words because surrounding culture was intolerant and stupid.
 
Top