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Fun with Hebrew Hieroglyphs.

Discussion in 'Religious Debates' started by John D. Brey, May 24, 2022.

  1. John D. Brey

    John D. Brey Well-Known Member

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    In ancient times, the Hebrew script was still hieroglyphic. In the evolution of the written word, the first case of archiving thought in stone, or other material, was considered a priestly function. Priests were the first people to archive ideas in stone. Only later did the sacred function of writing become profane, or mundane, i.e, demotic; "demotic" being the term used to speak of a written script used for purposes other than a priestly function.

    Furthermore, truth be known, in the producing of hieroglyphics, the priest was never more than an amanuensis, and never an author. In the original concept, the priest was uncovering hidden revelations in stone; he was removing the veil, the shroud, the outer material, covering up what God had put there, hidden there, from the get go. The priest was an archeologist and not an author; an amanuensis, and not the source of the revelation. His tools were like the tools of an archeologist and were used to dig out, to uncover, great mysteries and secrets hidden in stone or other materials.




    John
     
    #1 John D. Brey, May 24, 2022
    Last edited: May 24, 2022
  2. John D. Brey

    John D. Brey Well-Known Member

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    In various threads over the years, it's been shown ---literally, explicitly ---how the original sacred-glyphs (hiero-glyphs) of biblical Hebrew retain much of their original power. In threads like Shaddai: The Lamb of God, the hieroglyphic power retained by the biblical Hebrew, even the second order Gentile version (ktav ashuris), was shown to be capable of revealing still hidden secrets. In many of the incredible revelations found in more mystical texts like the Zohar, the insight concealed from more orthodox quarters come straight out of an appreciation of the still extant hieroglyphic nature of the biblical Hebrew script.

    In mystical Judaism, the hieroglyphic nature of the written revelation is understood to be a comprehensive element of all divine revelation: the sacred is always hidden, or veiled, in the profane, the mundane, the material, such that every ritual, every practice, every symbol, strands ready to unveil the otherwise shrouded nature of its spirit.



    John
     
    #2 John D. Brey, May 24, 2022
    Last edited: May 25, 2022
  3. John D. Brey

    John D. Brey Well-Known Member

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    Where the sacred, glyphic, nature of all divine revelation is the launching point for attempting to connect or reconnect to the divine spirit, sacerdotal rituals related to the body, which is appreciated as the preeminent temple of god, the gods, or God, become subject to the same scalpel, izmel, or shovel and broom (compressed air), used to uncover revelation in the inanimate soil. The animation of the soil of the human body suggests that though the sacred is hidden in the profane, we can surmise that the animate nature of the human body, and those rituals practiced there, retain an even more vibrant uncovering of the divine spirit than does the inanimate soil where text and context are first discovered; the opaque revelation in script, and hieroglyph, become more transparent, more spirited, in the flesh.

    Birkat Kohanim ברכת כהנים is a premier case in point; it's both a textual hieroglyph, and is even more lively, spirited, in the animated version of the glyph.

    ברכת כהנים



    John
     
    #3 John D. Brey, May 24, 2022
    Last edited: May 24, 2022
  4. John D. Brey

    John D. Brey Well-Known Member

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    Using the wisdom of Rabbi Yitzchak Ginsburg concerning the sacred meaning of the Hebrew letters, we can examine a number of hieroglyphic elements of the term "birkat kohanim" even in the ktav ashuris script. In the thread called Bere$hity Beginning, it was pointed out that the first word in the Torah בראשית (bere$hit) breaks down in a hieroglyphically fortuitous manner.

    בת=virgin daughter.
    בית=home, wife, temple (Yoma 2a.)
    ברית=covenant, pact.
    בר=son.
    ברא=create.
    ראש=first, firstborn.
    אש=fire
    שית=foundation, beginning.

    If we take the first word in the Torah, בראשית, we can make it speak of the "house" בית of the "firstborn" ראש, merely by separating the word that's in the midst of the larger word, from the word that house it (the larger word).

    ב––ית
    ב––ראש––ית

    In the first word in the Torah, the "firstborn" is in the midst of the temple, home, house, or mother, from the get–go. The rosh (firstborn) is in the beit (home, temple, mother), before she travailed, before her pain came. She brought forth before, speaking apart from a miracle, it was even possible.

    Broken down another way, we can say the "son" בר is the "created" ברא "foundation" (ברא–שית). We can say the "firstborn" ראש, is the yod י, or yad, or yid, who, when in the midst of a virgin home בת turns it into a Jewish home ב–י–ת. Furthermore, we can say that the "firstborn" ראש, found in the "virgin" בת, transforming her into a sacred "temple" בית, i.e., bere$hit ב–ראש–ית, is the whole point of the "covenant" ברית, since we can see that the word for "covenant" is the first word in the Torah before the "fire" אש of God is added to the mix.

    Ironically, if we take the word for "covenant" ברית, and remove the reish (which represents the rosh, the firstborn) we have the word for "house" or "temple." The Jewish house, home, temple, in the midst of Israel, is the place where the firstborn of God will be found-out, when he comes out, unannounced, and utterly unexpected (Isaiah 66:7).

    . . . "Cool, but what's all that got to do with birkat kohanim ברכת כהנים?"




    John
     
    #4 John D. Brey, May 25, 2022
    Last edited: May 25, 2022
  5. John D. Brey

    John D. Brey Well-Known Member

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    Throughout Jewish midrashim, we're told that the sign of the covenant, the very mark of God's Presence, is the tiny letter yod י. In the word for "covenant" it's the letter second to the end ברית. The word "birkat" (as in "birkat kohanim") is the word for covenant ברית with the mark of God, the yod י, covered up by the letter that spells, and represents, the "hand," the letter kaf כ. In the word for "birkat" (as in "birkat kohanim") we have the word for covenant, but where the blessing of the covenant, the Presence of God (marked by the yod י), is hidden in a hand, a kaf כ. The word "birkat" is the word "covenant" with the yod, the Presence of God, covered by a hand, or hands.

    That's pretty apropos since in the blessing of birkat kohanim, the priest uses his hands כ to form the place where God will be revealed in his most naked Presence. The yod of God, perhaps the yid of God (God's own kid), is going to come out from between the hands of the priest, which, when performing birkat kohanim, are said either to represent the intact veil in the temple, the yoni, vesica piscis, or perhaps the vulva. In all cases, the Presence of God is going to come out from behind an intact veil (Isaiah 66:7-10).

    Not only does the word "birkat" picture the covenant blessing as a yod, or yid, covered up in order to be revealed, by the priest's hands בר–כ–ת, but the word "priest" (kohen כהן) is itself made up of the letter kaf כ, followed by the demonstrative adverb "Behold!" הן. The very word "kohen" (priest) כהן, speaks of "beholding" what's found in, or between the fingers, of the priest's uplifted hands. In this sense, birkat kohanim could be considered the most fundamental purpose of the priests: to reveal the Presence of God coming out from between the fingers of their hands.



    John
     
  6. John D. Brey

    John D. Brey Well-Known Member

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    Addressed more carefully, the letter symbolism above sets up a distinction between procreation versus emanation. In the wrongheaded way of looking at these things, evolution, and growth, occurs only through binary unification, in humans, phallic-sex. Emanation tells a different story. In emanation, what's original, antecedent, is first hidden in what is secondary. In Professor Elliot Wolfson's nomenclature, the "origin" is hidden in the "beginning." The precision of Professors Wolfson's statement is lost on those who've never used emanation-exegesis on the beginning word in the scripture: בראשית.

    The sages wonder why the first word in the Torah begins with the second letter ב of the holy script rather than the first א? The first letter, the alef א, is found hidden in the word "beginning" בר–א–שהית, which begins with a beit ב, not and alef א. In the concept of emanation, the alef א, though indeed first, origin, is hidden in the very place that's the beginning of its revelation or revealing: the temple that houses the origin emanates from the origin. The house/temple בית, emanates from the alef א.

    And right here a fundamental distinction between Judaism and Christianity is born out of the emanation of the letters. In orthodox Judaism, the creation account is read as though God creates the world as a direct act of his omnipotence, whereas in Christianity he creates his firstborn first, and that intermediary/son בר is the tool, design, or organ, of the rest of creation. The Hebrew letters support the latter exegesis since the house, or temple, the beit בית, doesn't appear to be the first thing that emanates outward from the alef א, in the emanation of the Torah text.

    –– א ––
    ר–א–ש

    The first two letters to emanate from the alef א, found in the middle of the first word בראשית, are the reish ר, and the shin ש, spelling the word "rosh" ראש which is the word for "firstborn." But in the sense of this rosh ראש being hidden in the beginning word, we have to reverse the direction of the emanation, and picture the first word in which the emanation is hidden. That word is "beit בית. And it is indeed the cell-membrane of the alef and the rosh that secretly emanate inside it.

    ב–––––ית
    ב–ראש–ית

    As is clearly seen, the beit בית is the outer-membrane, the cell, the beginning word, where the alef א emanates forming the original word ---rosh ראש----hidden in the beginning word bet בית.

    ב–––––ית = outer shell, membrane, temple.
    ––– א – = even hashetiya אבן השתייה---- the foundation cornerstone.
    – ר–א–ש = first, firstborn emanating out of foundation.
    ב–––––ית = outer shell, membrane, temple.
    ב--ראש--ית = word "beginning" as beginning of Torah text.

    Now throw in the meaning of the letters and words noted above, all of which are parts and parcels of the spirit emanating out of the original letter alef א:

    בת=virgin daughter.
    בית=home, wife, temple (Yoma 2a.)
    ברית=covenant, pact.
    בר=son.
    ברא=create.
    ראש=first, firstborn.
    אש=fire
    שית=foundation, beginning.



    John
     
    #6 John D. Brey, May 28, 2022
    Last edited: May 28, 2022
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