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From a very curious agnostic... what 'religion' are you? What defines religion?

Discussion in 'Comparative Religion' started by katiep1203, Jan 21, 2012.

  1. katiep1203

    katiep1203 New Member

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    2
    I'd be very greatful if you help me out and answer a few questions for me?
    I would love to know what (if any) religion you consider yourself to be, and what religion means to you... And could you let me know what part of the UK or further afield (Worldwide!) you are from?

    Thank you,
    Katie.
     
    zenzero and Gharib like this.
  2. disciple

    disciple Well-Known Member

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    10,632
    Hi. People generally have their religion listed next to their username. I'm in the u.s.a.
     
  3. katiep1203

    katiep1203 New Member

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    2
    Hi there, thank you.
    Perhaps a more pressing question then is if you could clarify what exactly religion (your religion more specifically) means to you? I'm after personal experiences I suppose.
     
  4. disciple

    disciple Well-Known Member

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    10,632
    Ah, yes I noticed that part of your question after I responded. I think I'll just let other people answer.
     
  5. Storm

    Storm ThrUU the Looking Glass

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    44,609
    Religion:
    UU/ panentheist/ neopagan/ process theology
    I'm a Unitarian Universalist by affiliation, from the US. Seeing as that doesn't really say much about my theology, I'm also a panentheist with deep neopagan roots.

    Religion is primarily about community for me, with ritual a close second.
     
  6. The Sum of Awe

    The Sum of Awe Realitarian

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    13,902
    Religion:
    Stoicism
    Welcome to the forum, Katie! Hope you make yourself at home :)

    What religion you consider yourself to be

    I consider myself to be a Sith, for now, I can go under many different labels; Nihilism, Existentialism, Atheism, LHP, etc.

    What is means to you

    Nothing, as anyone can claim the title, and put a spin on it whether truthfully felt or a lie. They could be roleplayers or some other nonesense.

    Where I am from

    Iowa, U.S.A
     
  7. BruceDLimber

    BruceDLimber New Member

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    5,175
    I'm a Baha'i, and religion plays a major part in who I am and what I do with my time as well as my life generally!

    Peace, :)

    Bruce
     
  8. Levite

    Levite Higher and Higher

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    6,224
    Religion:
    Jewish
    I'm Jewish (Conservative/Masorti) living in the USA. I am a rabbi, so I guess my religion is fairly important to me. I value it because it is a spiritual discipline, because it is a way for me to structure an attempt to elevate myself in holiness, because I feel it brings me closer to God, and because it is my inheritance, the way of my people for uncounted centuries. I love Judaism, and I love being Jewish.
     
  9. zenzero

    zenzero Its only a Label

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    12,249
    Friend katie,

    being just a BEING which is a part of that *WHOLE* which is also labelled *God/Brahman/Allah/etc./etc. Considering religions to be paths or ways to merge with that *whole* find practicing no-path which too is a path but not confirming to any particular path.

    Love & rgds
     
  10. Katzpur

    Katzpur Not your average Mormon

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    25,156
    Religion:
    LDS Christian
    Hi, Katie. I'm a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; this means I'm a "Latter-day Saint" or "Mormon." To me, my religion helps me understand my relationship to God. It helps me know what He expects of me, and was I can expect of Him in return. It gives my life meaning and direction, and helps me in difficult times. I'm from Salt Lake City, Utah (but my ancestors on my dad's side were from Yorkshire ;).)
     
  11. Katzpur

    Katzpur Not your average Mormon

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    25,156
    Religion:
    LDS Christian
    Wow! I like that, especially the part I italicized! (I never realized before now that you are a rabbi. Good for you!)
     
  12. Gharib

    Gharib I want Khilafah back

    Messages:
    9,793
    Religion:
    Islam
    i follow islam thus am a muslim.
    islam is a complete way of life, it's not just a faith or religion as many think.
    to be honest i'm not very good with words and i find it difficult to explain what i mean or how i feel about something. if you have any other question i would be happy to answer it.

    i live in the country where everyone is upside down, to us it's normal but not to you in england. Australia is my country.

    and welcome to RF
     
  13. InformedIgnorance

    InformedIgnorance Do you 'know' or believe?

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    3,740
    I do not consider myself to have a 'religion' however I do consider myself to have a 'philosophical position' on theology which I arrived at through a particular 'philosophical approach'.


    My philosophical position on theology is one of strong agnosticism, which is atheistic towards most concepts of God and theistic only towards the most vaguely defined inactive preternatural force (not entity) which created matter and energy, space and time - PROVIDED that there is such a thing as time which has an origin. That stated, my theological position does not state that this force is not an entity (though I do not believe it is) or that it is not intelligent (though I do not believe it is) or that it is not actively involved in our current existence (though I do not believe it is), nor does it make any mention on the possibile single/multiple nature of the force or any heirarchy or specificity between such segments; as such my theological position is able to be adjusted to incorporate just about any other theological position in a way that enables meaningful discussion.

    My philosophical position referring to such a vaguely defined, inactive preternatural existence is one where the ramifications to people are negligible, outside of the field of philosophical (and theological) study, therefore, I find that apatheism is a reasonable response.

    The philosophical approach I use depends on the situation, if I am merely contemplating I tend to use an Ignostic based, falsification approach, where I firstly attempt to define or describe the concept I am considering and then attempt to use a logical framework to establish inherent contradictions of the different concepts being examined. That stated, this is only used as a guide for me to examine the position, while I believe it is possible that logic may not be applicable to the preternatural, I believe it is our best tool to do so in a rational fashion, therefore I am a strong adherent of logical approaches.

    When discussing other theological positions or approaches with others, I will vary my approach depending upon whether it is a rational discussion such as a debate (where I commonly use the Ignostic approach) or whether it is a non-rational discussion (where I use a more fideistic one, though I am sometimes prone to use rational components in such a discussion - which is a fallacy).



    While I was at school the idea of what constitutes a religion actually resolved around the degree of formality involved; religious texts, myths, rituals, symbols and so forth. Personally I feel that this level of formal codification and institutionalisation is what separates a religion from a theological position, and a philosophical position on theology which is similar, without a focus on worship of any sort.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2012
  14. methylatedghosts

    methylatedghosts Can't brain. Has dumb.

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    6,009
    Ok, here goes.
    I'm in New Zealand. I was brought up with a fairly basic idea of the Christian god, the basic stories around bible events, such as Noah's flood, Adam and Eve getting kicked out of the garden, Jesus living and dying. I also had some influence from my parents about what you could call new age. Ideas that would be considered taboo in Christianity, such as reincarnation, and psychic phenomena etc.

    What I'd mostly been taught though, is how to think, rather than what to think. Questions I had were often first met with "Well, what do YOU think?", because most of the time, these questions would arise out of having done some thinking on the subject myself. There wasn't a question that wasn't allowed to be asked, as difficult the question might be.

    On top of that, I went to a Catholic school from age 10-12, then again from 15-18. Public schools at all other times. This led me, not so much to have all the answers, but to ask even more questions, and so I read on it. I would read books on certain beliefs and religions, for a few months, get sick of them and switch to fantasy novels for example. More and more of my reading lately has been of the spiritual/belief/religious kind. You'll see by my username I've entered "Pick-'n'-mixism". By that I mean, I pick all the best sweets from what I've read, and mix them all up, and come up with a colourful "mixed-bag" worldview. I like to think it's unique, because no-one else could possibly read the same books I have, and come to all the same conclusions. Hell - most people can't agree on the bible! :p
     
  15. Penumbra

    Penumbra Well-Known Member Staff Member Premium Member

    Messages:
    14,622
    Hello Katie.

    I don't identify with any religion. Religion, to me, I guess means a lot of things based on who I encounter, such as believing things from books, believing in gods, supernatural beings, transcendental states, and so forth.

    My personal philosophy is most specifically described as Virtue Ethics, with roots in classical Greek philosophy. I strive for continual personal development and awareness. I've read numerous religions texts, including the Bhagavad Gita, the Tao Te Ching, the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, the Qur'an, and a number of the Upanishads. I draw upon some of them for inspiration, such as the Bhagavad Gita, but I personally find less value in some of them. I also derive value from philosophical works, such as Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, or Albert Camus The Myth of Sisyphus, or from the general example of people such as Benjamin Franklin and other people with similar broad-based personal development approaches.

    I'm from the United States.
     
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